As Seen In: USA Today, Discovery Channel, US News & World Report

Knots

All knots used by a mountaineer are divided into four classes: Class I—joining knots, Class II—anchor knots, Class III—middle rope knots, and Class IV—special knots. The variety of knots, bends, bights, and hitches is almost endless. These classes of knots are intended only as a general guide since some of the knots discussed may be appropriate in more than one class. The skill of knot tying can perish if not used and practiced. With experience and practice, knot tying becomes instinctive and helps the mountaineer in many situations.

Square Knot

The square knot is used to tie the ends of two ropes of equal diameter (Figure 4-6). It is a joining knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Holding one working end in each hand, place the working end in the right hand over the one in the left hand.

STEP 2. Pull it under and back over the top of the rope in the left hand.

STEP 3. Place the working end in the left hand over the one in the right hand and repeat STEP 2.

STEP 4. Dress the knot down and secure it with an overhand knot on each side of the square knot.

Figure 4-6. Square knot.

Figure 4-6. Square knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) There are two interlocking bights.

(2) The running end and standing part are on the same side of the bight formed by the other rope.

(3) The running ends are parallel to and on the same side of the standing ends with 4-inch minimum pig tails after the overhand safeties are tied.

Fisherman's Knot

The fishermanís knot is used to tie two ropes of the same or approximately the same diameter (Figure 4-7). It is a joining knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Tie an overhand knot in one end of the rope.

STEP 2. Pass the working end of the other rope through the first overhand knot. Tie an overhand knot around the standing part of the first rope with the working end of the second rope.

STEP 3. Tightly dress down each overhand knot and tightly draw the knots together.

Figure 4-7. Fisherman's knot.

Figure 4-7. Fishermanís knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The two separate overhand knots are tied tightly around the long, standing part of the opposing rope.

(2) The two overhand knots are drawn snug.

(3) Ends of rope exit knot opposite each other with 4-inch pigtails.

Double Fisherman's Knot

The double fishermanís knot (also called double English or grapevine) is used to tie two ropes of the same or approximately the same diameter (Figure 4-8). It is a joining knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. With the working end of one rope, tie two wraps around the standing part of another rope.

STEP 2. Insert the working end (STEP 1) back through the two wraps and draw it tight.

STEP 3. With the working end of the other rope, which contains the standing part (STEPS 1 and 2), tie two wraps around the standing part of the other rope (the working end in STEP 1). Insert the working end back through the two wraps and draw tight.

STEP 4. Pull on the opposing ends to bring the two knots together.

Figure 4-8. Double fisherman's knot.

Figure 4-8. Double fishermanís knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) Two double overhand knots securing each other as the standing parts of the rope are pulled apart.

(2) Four rope parts on one side of the knot form two "x" patterns, four rope parts on the other side of the knot are parallel.

(3) Ends of rope exit knot opposite each other with 4-inch pigtails.

Figure-Eight Bend

The figure-eight bend is used to join the ends of two ropes of equal or unequal diameter within 5-mm difference (Figure 4-9).

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Grasp the top of a 2-foot bight.

STEP 2. With the other hand, grasp the running end (short end) and make a 360-degree turn around the standing end.

STEP 3. Place the running end through the loop just formed creating an in-line figure eight.

STEP 4. Route the running end of the other ripe back through the figure eight starting from the original ropeís running end. Trace the original knot to the standing end.

STEP 5. Remove all unnecessary twists and crossovers. Dress the knot down.

Figure 4-9. Figure-eight bend.

Figure 4-9. Figure-eight bend.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) There is a figure eight with two ropes running side by side.

(2) The running ends are on opposite sides of the knot.

(3) There is a minimum 4-inch pigtail.

Water Knot

The water knot is used to attach two webbing ends (Figure 4-10). It is also called a ring bend, overhand retrace, or tape knot. It is used in runners and harnesses and is a joining knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Tie an overhand knot in one of the ends.

STEP 2. Feed the other end back through the knot, following the path of the first rope in reverse.

STEP 3. Draw tight and pull all of the slack out of the knot. The remaining tails must extend at least 4 inches beyond the knot in both directions.

Figure 4-10. Water knot.

Figure 4-10. Water knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) There are two overhand knots, one retracing the other.

(2) There is no slack in the knot, and the working ends come out of the knot in opposite directions.

(3) There is a minimum 4-inch pigtail.

Bowline

The bowline is used to tie the end of a rope around an anchor. It may also be used to tie a single fixed loop in the end of a rope (Figure 4-11). It is an anchor knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Bring the working end of the rope around the anchor, from right to left (as the climber faces the anchor).

STEP 2. Form an overhand loop in the standing part of the rope (on the climberís right) toward the anchor.

STEP 3. Reach through the loop and pull up a bight.

STEP 4. Place the working end of the rope (on the climberís left) through the bight, and bring it back onto itself. Now dress the knot down.

STEP 5. Form an overhand knot with the tail from the bight.

Figure 4-11. Bowline knot.

Figure 4-11. Bowline knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The bight is locked into place by a loop.

(2) The short portion of the bight is on the inside and on the loop around the anchor (or inside the fixed loop).

(3) There is a minimum 4-inch pigtail after tying the overhand safety.

Round Turn and Two Half Hitches

This knot is used to tie the end of a rope to an anchor, and it must have constant tension (Figure 4-12). It is an anchor knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Route the rope around the anchor from right to left and wrap down (must have two wraps in the rear of the anchor, and one in the front). Run the loop around the object to provide 360-degree contact, distributing the load over the anchor.

STEP 2. Bring the working end of the rope left to right and over the standing part, forming a half hitch (first half hitch).

STEP 3. Repeat STEP 2 (last half hitch has a 4 inch pigtail).

STEP 4. Dress the knot down.

Figure 4-12. Round turn and two half hitches.

Figure 4-12. Round turn and two half hitches.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) A complete round turn should exist around the anchor with no crosses.

(2) Two half hitches should be held in place by a diagonal locking bar with no less than a 4-inch pigtail remaining.

Figure-Eight Retrace (Rerouted Figure-Eight)

The figure-eight retrace knot produces the same result as a figure-eight loop. However, by tying the knot in a retrace, it can be used to fasten the rope to trees or to places where the loop cannot be used (Figure 4-13). It is also called a rerouted figure-eight and is an anchor knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Use a length of rope long enough to go around the anchor, leaving enough rope to work with.

STEP 2. Tie a figure-eight knot in the standing part of the rope, leaving enough rope to go around the anchor. To tie a figure-eight knot form a loop in the rope, wrap the working end around the standing part, and route the working end through the loop. The finished knot is dressed loosely.

STEP 3. Take the working end around the anchor point.

STEP 4. With the working end, insert the rope back through the loop of the knot in reverse.

STEP 5. Keep the original figure eight as the outside rope and retrace the knot around the wrap and back to the long-standing part.

STEP 6. Remove all unnecessary twists and crossovers; dress the knot down.

Figure 4-13. Figure-eight retrace.

Figure 4-13. Figure-eight retrace.

b. Checkpoints

(1) A figure eight with a doubled rope running side by side, forming a fixed loop around a fixed object or harness.

(2) There is a minimum 4-inch pigtail.

Clove Hitch

The clove hitch is an anchor knot that can be used in the middle of the rope as well as at the end (Figure 4-14). The knot must have constant tension on it once tied to prevent slipping. It can be used as either an anchor or middle of the rope knot, depending on how it is tied.

a. Tying the Knot.

(1) Middle of the Rope.

STEP 1. Hold rope in both hands, palms down with hands together. Slide the left hand to the left from 20 to 25 centimeters.

STEP 2. Form a loop away from and back toward the right.

STEP 3. Slide the right hand from 20 to 25 centimeters to the right. Form a loop inward and back to the left hand.

STEP 4. Place the left loop on top of the right loop. Place both loops over the anchor and pull both ends of the rope in opposite directions. The knot is tied.

(2) End of the Rope.

Note: For instructional purposes, assume that the anchor is horizontal.

STEP 1. Place 76 centimeters of rope over the top of the anchor. Hold the standing end in the left hand. With the right hand, reach under the horizontal anchor, grasp the working end, and bring it inward.

STEP 2. Place the working end of the rope over the standing end (to form a loop). Hold the loop in the left hand. Place the working end over the anchor from 20 to 25 centimeters to the left of the loop.

STEP 3. With the right hand, reach down to the left hand side of the loop under the anchor. Grasp the working end of the rope. Bring the working end up and outward.

STEP 4. Dress down the knot.

Figure 4-14. Clove hitch.

Figure 4-14. Clove hitch.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The knot has two round turns around the anchor with a diagonal locking bar.

(2) The locking bar is facing 90 degrees from the direction of pull.

(3) The ends exit l80 degrees from each other.

(4) The knot has more than a 4-inch pigtail remaining.

Wireman's Knot

The wiremanís knot forms a single, fixed loop in the middle of the rope (Figure 4-15). It is a middle rope knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. When tying this knot, face the anchor that the tie-off system will be tied to. Take up the slack from the anchor, and wrap two turns around the left hand (palm up) from left to right.

STEP 2. A loop of 30 centimeters is taken up in the second round turn to create the fixed loop of the knot.

STEP 3. Name the wraps from the palm to the fingertips: heel, palm, and fingertip.

STEP 4. Secure the palm wrap with the right thumb and forefinger, and place it over the heel wrap.

STEP 5. Secure the heel wrap and place it over the fingertip wrap.

STEP 6. Secure the fingertip wrap and place it over the palm wrap.

STEP 7. Secure the palm wrap and pull up to form a fixed loop.

STEP 8. Dress the knot down by pulling on the fixed loop and the two working ends.

STEP 9. Pull the working ends apart to finish the knot.

Figure 4-15. Wireman's knot.

Figure 4-15. Wiremanís knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The completed knot should have four separate bights locking down on themselves with the fixed loop exiting from the top of the knot and laying toward the near side anchor point.

(2) Both ends should exit opposite each other without any bends.

Directional Figure-Eight

The directional figure-eight knot forms a single, fixed loop in the middle of the rope that lays back along the standing part of the rope (Figure 4-16). It is a middle rope knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Face the far side anchor so that when the knot is tied, it lays inward.

STEP 2. Lay the rope from the far side anchor over the left palm. Make one wrap around the palm.

STEP 3. With the wrap thus formed, tie a figure-eight knot around the standing part that leads to the far side anchor.

STEP 4. When dressing the knot down, the tail and the bight must be together.

Figure 4-16. Directional figure-eight.

Figure 4-16. Directional figure-eight.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The loop should be large enough to accept a carabiner but no larger than a helmet-size loop.

(2) The tail and bight must be together.

(3) The figure eight is tied tightly.

(4) The bight in the knot faces back toward the near side.

Bowline-On-A-Bight (Two-Loop Bowline)

The bowline-on-a-bight is used to form two fixed loops in the middle of a rope (Figure 4-17). It is a middle rope knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Form a bight in the rope about twice as long as the finished loops will be.

STEP 2. Tie an overhand knot on a bight.

STEP 3. Hold the overhand knot in the left hand so that the bight is running down and outward.

STEP 4. Grasp the bight with the right hand; fold it back over the overhand knot so that the overhand knot goes through the bight.

STEP 5. From the end (apex) of the bight, follow the bight back to where it forms the cross in the overhand knot. Grasp the two ropes that run down and outward and pull up, forming two loops.

STEP 6. Pull the two ropes out of the overhand knot and dress the knot down.

STEP 7. A final dress is required: grasp the ends of the two fixed loops and pull, spreading them apart to ensure the loops do not slip.

Figure 4-17. Bowline-on-a-bight.

Figure 4-17. Bowline-on-a-bight.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) There are two fixed loops that will not slip.

(2) There are no twists in the knot.

(3) A double loop is held in place by a bight.

Two-Loop Figure-Eight

The two-loop figure-eight is used to form two fixed loops in the middle of a rope (Figure 4-18.) It is a middle rope knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Using a doubled rope, form an 18-inch bight in the left hand with the running end facing to the left.

STEP 2. Grasp the bight with the right hand and make a 360-degree turn around the standing end in a counterclockwise direction.

STEP 3. With the working end, form another bight and place that bight through the loop just formed in the left hand.

STEP 4. Hold the bight with the left hand, and place the original bight (moving toward the left hand) over the knot.

STEP 5. Dress the knot down.

Figure 4-18. Two-loop figure-eight.

Figure 4-18. Two-loop figure-eight.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) There is a double figure-eight knot with two loops that share a common locking bar.

(2) The two loops must be adjustable by means of a common locking bar.

(3) The common locking bar is on the bottom of the double figure-eight knot.

Figure-Eight Loop (Figure-Eight-On-A-Bight)

The figure-eight loop, also called the figure-eight-on-a-bight, is used to form a fixed loop in a rope (Figure 4-19). It is a middle of the rope knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Form a bight in the rope about as large as the diameter of the desired loop.

STEP 2. With the bight as the working end, form a loop in rope (standing part).

STEP 3. Wrap the working end around the standing part 360 degrees and feed the working end through the loop. Dress the knot tightly.

Figure 4-19. Figure-eight loop.

Figure 4-19. Figure-eight loop.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The loop is the desired size.

(2) The ropes in the loop are parallel and do not cross over each other.

(3) The knot is tightly dressed.

Prusik Knot

The Prusik knot is used to put a moveable rope on a fixed rope such as a Prusik ascent or a tightening system. This knot can be tied as a middle or end of the rope Prusik. It is a specialty knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

(1) Middle-of-the-Rope Prusik. The middle-of-the-rope Prusik knot can be tied with a short rope to a long rope as follows (Figure 4-20.):

STEP 1. Double the short rope, forming a bight, with the working ends even. Lay it over the long rope so that the closed end of the bight is 12 inches below the long rope and the remaining part of the rope (working ends) is the closest to the climber; spread the working end apart.

STEP 2. Reach down through the 12-inch bight. Pull up both of the working ends and lay them over the long rope. Repeat this process making sure that the working ends pass in the middle of the first two wraps. Now there are four wraps and a locking bar working across them on the long rope.

STEP 3. Dress the wraps and locking bar down to ensure they are tight and not twisted. Tying an overhand knot with both ropes will prevent the knot from slipping during periods of variable tension.

Figure 4-20. Middle-of-the-rope Prusik.

Figure 4-20. Middle-of-the-rope Prusik.

(2) End-of-the-Rope Prusik (Figure 4-21).

STEP 1. Using an armís length of rope, and place it over the long rope.

STEP 2. Form a complete round turn in the rope.

STEP 3. Cross over the standing part of the short rope with the working end of the short rope.

STEP 4. Lay the working end under the long rope.

STEP 5. Form a complete round turn in the rope, working back toward the middle of the knot.

STEP 6. There are four wraps and a locking bar running across them on the long rope. Dress the wraps and locking bar down. Ensure they are tight, parallel, and not twisted.

STEP 7. Finish the knot with a bowline to ensure that the Prusik knot will not slip out during periods of varying tension.

Figure 4-21. End-of-the-rope Prusik knot.

Figure 4-21. End-of-the-rope Prusik knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) Four wraps with a locking bar.

(2) The locking bar faces the climber.

(3) The knot is tight and dressed down with no ropes twisted or crossed.

(4) Other than a finger Prusik, the knot should contain an overhand or bowline to prevent slipping.

Bachman Knot

The Bachman knot provides a means of using a makeshift mechanized ascender (Figure 4-22). It is a specialty knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Find the middle of a utility rope and insert it into a carabiner.

STEP 2. Place the carabiner and utility rope next to a long climbing rope.

STEP 3. With the two ropes parallel from the carabiner, make two or more wraps around the climbing rope and through the inside portion of the carabiner.

Note: The rope can be tied into an etrier (stirrup) and used as a Prusik-friction principle ascender.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The bight of the climbing rope is at the top of the carabiner.

(2) The two ropes run parallel without twisting or crossing.

(3) Two or more wraps are made around the long climbing rope and through the inside portion of the carabiner.

Figure 4-22. Bachman knot.

Figure 4-22. Bachman knot.

Bowline-On-A-Coil

The bowline-on-a-coil is an expedient tie-in used by climbers when a climbing harness is not available (Figure 4-23). It is a specialty knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. With the running end, place 3 feet of rope over your right shoulder. The running end is to the back of the body.

STEP 2. Starting at the bottom of your rib cage, wrap the standing part of the rope around your body and down in a clockwise direction four to eight times.

STEP 3. With the standing portion of the rope in your left hand, make a clockwise loop toward the body. The standing portion is on the bottom.

STEP 4. Ensuring the loop does not come uncrossed, bring it up and under the coils between the rope and your body.

STEP 5. Using the standing part, bring a bight up through the loop. Grasp the running end of the rope with the right hand. Pass it through the bight from right to left and back on itself.

STEP 6. Holding the bight loosely, dress the knot down by pulling on the standing end.

STEP 7. Safety the bowline with an overhand around the top, single coil. Then, tie an overhand around all coils, leaving a minimum 4-inch pigtail.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) A minimum of four wraps, not crossed, with a bight held in place by a loop.

(2) The loop must be underneath all wraps.

(3) A minimum 4-inch pigtail after the second overhand safety is tied.

(4) Must be centered on the mid-line of the body.

Figure 4-23. Bowline-on-a-coil.

Figure 4-23. Bowline-on-a-coil.

Three-Loop Bowline

The three-loop bowline is used to form three fixed loops in the middle of a rope (Figure 4-24). It is used in a self-equalizing anchor system. It is a specialty knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Form an approximate 24-inch bight.

STEP 2. With the right thumb facing toward the body, form a doubled loop in the standing part by turning the wrist clockwise. Lay the loops to the right.

STEP 3. With the right hand, reach down through the loops and pull up a doubled bight from the standing part of the rope.

STEP 4. Place the running end (bight) of the rope (on the left) through the doubled bight from left to right and bring it back on itself. Hold the running end loosely and dress the knot down by pulling on the standing parts.

STEP 5. Safety it off with a doubled overhand knot.

Figure 4-24. Three-loop bowline.

Figure 4-24. Three-loop bowline.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) There are two bights held in place by two loops.

(2) The bights form locking bars around the standing parts.

(3) The running end (bight) must be on the inside of the fixed loops.

(4) There is a minimum 4-inch pigtail after the double overhand safety knot is tied.

Figure-Eight Slip Knot

The figure eight slip knot forms an adjustable bight in a rope (Figure 4-25). It is a specialty knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Form a 12-inch bight in the end of the rope.

STEP 2. Hold the center of the bight in the right hand. Hold the two parallel ropes from the bight in the left hand about 12 inches up the rope.

STEP 3. With the center of the bight in the right hand, twist two complete turns clockwise.

STEP 4. Reach through the bight and grasp the long, standing end of the rope. Pull another bight (from the long standing end) back through the original bight.

STEP 5. Pull down on the short working end of the rope and dress the knot down.

STEP 6. If the knot is to be used in a transport tightening system, take the working end of the rope and form a half hitch around the loop of the figure eight knot.

Figure 4-25. Figure-eight slip knot.

Figure 4-25. Figure-eight slip knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The knot is in the shape of a figure eight.

(2) Both ropes of the bight pass through the same loop of the figure eight.

(3) The sliding portion of the rope is the long working end of the rope.

Transport Knot (Overhand Slip Knot/Mule Knot)

The transport knot is used to secure the transport tightening system (Figure 4-26). It is simply an overhand slip knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Pass the running end of the rope around the anchor point passing it back under the standing portion (leading to the far side anchor) forming a loop.

STEP 2. Form a bight with the running end of the rope. Pass over the standing portion and down through the loop and dress it down toward the anchor point.

STEP 3. Secure the knot by tying a half hitch around the standing portion with the bight.

Figure 4-26. Transport knot.

Figure 4-26. Transport knot.

b. Check Points.

(1) There is a single overhand slip knot.

(2) The knot is secured using a half hitch on a bight.

(3) The bight is a minimum of 12 inches long.

Kleimhiest Knot

The Kleimhiest knot provides a moveable, easily adjustable, high-tension knot capable of holding extremely heavy loads while being pulled tight (Figure 4-27). It is a special-purpose knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Using a utility rope or webbing offset the ends by 12 inches. With the ends offset, find the center of the rope and form a bight. Lay the bight over a horizontal rope.

STEP 2. Wrap the tails of the utility rope around the horizontal rope back toward the direction of pull. Wrap at least four complete turns.

STEP 3. With the remaining tails of the utility rope, pass them through the bight (see STEP 1).

STEP 4. Join the two ends of the tail with a joining knot.

STEP 5. Dress the knot down tightly so that all wraps are touching.

Note: Spectra should not be used for the Kleimhiest knot. It has a low melting point and tends to slip .

Figure 4-27. Kleimhiest knot.

Figure 4-27. Kleimhiest knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The bight is opposite the direction of pull.

(2) All wraps are tight and touching.

(3) The ends of the utility rope are properly secured with a joining knot.

Frost Knot

The frost knot is used when working with webbing (Figure 4-28). It is used to create the top loop of an etrier. It is a special-purpose knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Lap one end (a bight) of webbing over the other about 10 to 12 inches.

STEP 2. Tie an overhand knot with the newly formed triple-strand webbing; dress tightly.

Figure 4-28. Frost knot.

Figure 4-28. Frost knot.

b. Checkpoints.

(1) The tails of the webbing run in opposite directions.

(2) Three strands of webbing are formed into a tight overhand knot.

(3) There is a bight and tail exiting the top of the overhand knot.

Girth Hitch

The girth hitch is used to attach a runner to an anchor or piece of equipment (Figure 4-29). It is a special-purpose knot.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1: Form a bight.

STEP 2: Bring the runner back through the bight.

STEP 3: Cinch the knot tightly.

Figure 4-29. Girth hitch.

Figure 4-29. Girth hitch.

b. Checkpoint.

(1) Two wraps exist with a locking bar running across the wraps.

(2) The knot is dressed tightly.

Munter Hitch

The munter hitch, when used in conjunction with a pear-shaped locking carabiner, is used to form a mechanical belay (Figure 4-30).

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Hold the rope in both hands, palms down about 12 inches apart.

STEP 2. With the right hand, form a loop away from the body toward the left hand. Hold the loop with the left hand.

STEP 3. With the right hand, place the rope that comes from the bottom of the loop over the top of the loop.

STEP 4. Place the bight that has just been formed around the rope into the pear shaped carabiner. Lock the locking mechanism.

b. Check Points.

(1) A bight passes through the carabiner, with the closed end around the standing or running part of the rope.

(2) The carabiner is locked.

Figure 4-30. Munter hitch.

Figure 4-30. Munter hitch.

Rappel Seat

The rappel seat is an improvised seat rappel harness made of rope (Figure 4-31). It usually requires a sling rope 14 feet or longer.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Find the middle of the sling rope and make a bight.

STEP 2. Decide which hand will be used as the brake hand and place the bight on the opposite hip.

STEP 3. Reach around behind and grab a single strand of rope. Bring it around the waist to the front and tie two overhands on the other strand of rope, thus creating a loop around the waist.

STEP 4. Pass the two ends between the legs, ensuring they do not cross.

STEP 5. Pass the two ends up under the loop around the waist, bisecting the pocket flaps on the trousers. Pull up on the ropes, tightening the seat.

STEP 6. From rear to front, pass the two ends through the leg loops creating a half hitch on both hips.

STEP 7. Bring the longer of the two ends across the front to the nonbrake hand hip and secure the two ends with a square knot safetied with overhand knots. Tuck any excess rope in the pocket below the square knot.

Figure 4-31. Rappel seat.

Figure 4-31. Rappel seat.

b. Check Points.

(1) There are two overhand knots in the front.

(2) The ropes are not crossed between the legs.

(3) A half hitch is formed on each hip.

(4) Seat is secured with a square knot with overhand safeties on the non-brake hand side.

(5) There is a minimum 4-inch pigtail after the overhand safeties are tied.

Guarde Knot

The guarde knot (ratchet knot, alpine clutch) is a special purpose knot primarily used for hauling systems or rescue (Figure 4-32). The knot works in only one direction and cannot be reversed while under load.

a. Tying the Knot.

STEP 1. Place a bight of rope into the two anchored carabiners (works best with two like carabiners, preferably ovals).

STEP 2. Take a loop of rope from the non-load side and place it down into the opposite cararabiner so that the rope comes out between the two carabiners.

Figure 4-32. Guarde knot.

Figure 4-32. Guarde knot.

b. Check Points.

(1) When properly dressed, rope can only be pulled in one direction.

(2) The knot will not fail when placed under load.

Back to Ropes & Knots




Ultimate Survival Knife & Kit

List Price: 61.99

Our Price: 39.95

This 15 inch survival knife with drop point blade features a thick quality stainless steel blade with serrated top edge. Textured and ribbed solid metal handle and guard. Nylon sheath. Survival kit includes a hollow grip with a compass top to store items within the knife itself, as well as additional pouches on the sheath to hold the rest. Complete survival kit.

Click Here to Buy the Survival Knife Now.


Copyright © 2001 - 2017 Jalic Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Advertise Here | Contact Us