As Seen In: USA Today, Discovery Channel, US News & World Report

Natural Anchors

Natural anchors should be considered for use first. They are usually strong and often simple to construct with minimal use of equipment. Trees, boulders, and other terrain irregularities are already in place and simply require a method of attaching the rope. However, natural anchors should be carefully studied and evaluated for stability and strength before use. Sometimes the climbing rope is tied directly to the anchor, but under most circumstances a sling is attached to the anchor and then the climbing rope is attached to the sling with a carabiner(s). (See paragraph 5-7 for slinging techniques.)

Trees

Trees are probably the most widely used of all natural anchors depending on the terrain and geographical region (Figure 5-1). However, trees must be carefully checked for suitability.

Figure 5-1. Trees used as anchors.

Figure 5-1. Trees used as anchors.

a. In rocky terrain, treesusually have a shallow root system. This can be checked by pushing or tugging on the tree to see how well it i rooted. Anchoring as low as possible to prevent excess leverage on the tree may be necessary.

b. Use padding on soft, sap producing trees to keep sap off ropes and slings.

Boulders

Boulders and rock nubbins make ideal anchors (Figure 5-2). The rock can be firmly tapped with a piton hammer to ensure it is solid. Sedimentary and other loose rock formations are not stable. Talus and scree fields are an indicator that the rock in the area is not solid. All areas around the rock formation that could cut the rope or sling should be padded.

Figure 5-2. Boulders used as anchors.

Figure 5-2. Boulders used as anchors.

Chockstones

A chockstone is a rock that is wedged in a crack because the crack narrows downward (Figure 5-3). Chockstones should be checked for strength, security, and crumbling and should always be tested before use. All chockstones must be solid and strong enough to support the load. They must have maximum surface contact and be well tapered with the surrounding rock to remain in position.

Figure 5-3. Chockstones.

Figure 5-3. Chockstones.

a. Chockstones are often directional—they are secure when pulled in one direction but may pop out if pulled in another direction.

b. A creative climber can often make his own chockstone by wedging a rock into position, tying a rope to it, and clipping on a carabiner.

c. Slings should not be wedged between the chockstone and the rock wall since a fall could cut the webbing runner.

Rock Projections

Rock projections (sometimes called nubbins) often provide suitable protection (Figure 5-4). These include blocks, flakes, horns, and spikes. If rock projections are used, their firmness is important. They should be checked for cracks or weathering that may impair their firmness. If any of these signs exist, the projection should be avoided.

Figure 5-4. Rock projections.

Figure 5-4. Rock projections.

Tunnels and Arches

Tunnels and arches are holes formed in solid rock and provide one of the more secure anchor points because they can be pulled in any direction. A sling is threaded through the opening hole and secured with a joining knot or girth hitch. The load-bearing hole must be strong and free of sharp edges (pad if necessary).

Brushes and Shrubs

If no other suitable anchor is available, the roots of bushes can be used by routing a rope around the bases of several bushes (Figure 5-5). As with trees, the anchoring rope is placed as low as possible to reduce leverage on the anchor. All vegetation should be healthy and well rooted to the ground.

Figure 5-5. Bushes and shrubs.

Figure 5-5. Bushes and shrubs.

Slinging Techniques

Three methods are used to attach a sling to a natural anchor—drape, wrap, and girth. Whichever method is used, the knot is set off to the side where it will not interfere with normal carabiner movement. The carabiner gate should face away from the ground and open away from the anchor for easy insertion of the rope. When a locking carabiner cannot be used, two carabiners are used with gates opposed. Correctly opposed gates should open on opposite sides and form an "X" when opened (Figure 5-6).

Figure 5-6. Correctly opposed carabiners.

Figure 5-6. Correctly opposed carabiners.

a. Drape. Drape the sling over the anchor (Figure 5-7). Untying the sling and routing it around the anchor and then retying is still considered a drape.

Figure 5-7. Drape.

Figure 5-7. Drape.

b. Wrap. Wrap the sling around the anchor and connect the two ends together with a carabiner(s) or knot (Figure 5-8).

Figure 5-8. Wrap.

Figure 5-8. Wrap.

c. Girth. Tie the sling around the anchor with a girth hitch (Figure 5-9). Although a girth hitch reduces the strength of the sling, it allows the sling to remain in position and not slide on the anchor.

Figure 5-9. Girth.

Figure 5-9. Girth.

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