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Thread: looking to learn and survive!!!

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    Default looking to learn and survive!!!

    Hi my name is Jordan and I am 20 years old. I'm from up north in Ontario Canada. I'm looking to learn how to spend the night or many in the bush and survive. I hunt a lot and I also do a lot of snowmaching and I got thinking and what would I do if I broke down how would I survive the night? Growing up I have taken basic outdoors survival camps but nothing to crazy. I hope I came to the right place to learn!!!


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    Welcome from Alaska.....Yep, this is the right place.

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    Another Canuck!

    Sweet....

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    Welcome. I think wanting to learn and survive is pretty universal (heh).

    Surviving "one" night outdoors is easy. Wear proper clothing and you're set in most cases (barring any serious accident or injury). As one night turns into possibly others is where skills and knowledge can be critical.

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    Welcome to the forum,if you catch wareagle online,he is from that general area.
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    Hello and welcome.
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    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    welcome to the forum soil stack
    now we will see what kind of an apprentice you can be
    always be prepared-prepare all ways
    http://wareaglesurvival.blogspot.com

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    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool HI!

    Nice intro! Welcome brutha! It has been my experience that the more you know about the outdoors the greater the odds are that you'll never have to use "Survival Skills".
    SARGE
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
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    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sthomas View Post
    Welcome. I think wanting to learn and survive is pretty universal (heh).

    Surviving "one" night outdoors is easy. Wear proper clothing and you're set in most cases (barring any serious accident or injury). As one night turns into possibly others is where skills and knowledge can be critical.
    Really? tell that to all the dead people who thought so, it's always kind of a circumstantial thing, y'know?

    Anywhoo, WarEagle's found an apprentice so we'll probably never hear the end of the pontificating now (((sigh))) Welcome aboard Jordan and good luck (I'm kiddin' ya man, WE's a good guy)
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

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    Quote Originally Posted by trax View Post
    Really? tell that to all the dead people who thought so, it's always kind of a circumstantial thing, y'know?
    Yes, really. Obviously all those people did not wear "proper clothing" (as I clearly noted), which is always your "primary shelter" in any wilderness survival situation. If you know the temps are gonna be 10-degrees-F overnight and the clothes you wear on a day-hike or overnighter will keep you "warm enough" in such temps, you "won't" die from exposure (again barring accident/injury as I clearly noted in the post).

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    (FMR) Wilderness Guide pgvoutdoors's Avatar
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    Welcome Aboard!
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    Senior Member Riverrat's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum...this is a great place to start learning.

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    Senior Member Runs With Beer's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum.

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    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sthomas View Post
    Yes, really. Obviously all those people did not wear "proper clothing" (as I clearly noted), which is always your "primary shelter" in any wilderness survival situation. If you know the temps are gonna be 10-degrees-F overnight and the clothes you wear on a day-hike or overnighter will keep you "warm enough" in such temps, you "won't" die from exposure (again barring accident/injury as I clearly noted in the post).
    Ask WE if his night out in -37 C was "easy" or better yet, try it because I don't care what you're wearing, there's a big difference between surviving and easy.

    Try building a fire when it's that temperature and the wind decides to start kicking up the snow.
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

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    Quote Originally Posted by trax View Post
    Ask WE if his night out in -37 C was "easy" or better yet, try it because I don't care what you're wearing, there's a big difference between surviving and easy.

    Try building a fire when it's that temperature and the wind decides to start kicking up the snow.
    Obviously you wish to be argumentive about my assertion that "spending one night outdoors if you're properly dressed is easy". Perhaps you assume that because I only have a few posts here and you have thousands that I don't know what I'm talking about. That assumption would be wrong. I won't engage in a flame war about the topic of survival, but I do challenge you to prove that what I originally posted is flatly wrong.

    In response to your latest post on the matter;
    - I've spent "hundreds" of nights outdoors without a tent or sleeping bag, and many of them were easy.
    - Countless others have spent a single night outdoors wearing proper clothing for their environment and not much else, and survived. Feel free to locate and question them all, to find out if that one night was easy or hard.
    - Refer to the Rules of 3. No one dies or is overly uncomfortable from dehydration or starvation in a single night. That leaves injury or exposure as possibilities of death or discomfort. I assert that if you're adequately prepared for those risks under whatever conditions exist at that point in time, a night outdoors is easy.
    - I can't speak for WE, but since he's an obvious student of the survival topic I would imagine he went into that night "prepared" for it. I did see that he had a sleeping bag in his shelter, but I don't know what temp-rating his clothes or that bag were. Perhaps you should let him state whether it was "easy enough because he was adequately prepared for those conditions" or "absolutely miserable because he wasn't". Those are the only two possibilities here.
    - You can bet that if I plan to spend one night in -37 temps, I will be wearing Arctic clothing comfort-rated to -20 temps....along with other layers that bring that comfort-rating lower, I will go in planning to build an adequate shelter, and I will be prepared to start a fire if I find I need one. And being prepared, I'm sure I'll be able to say at the end of it that the night was "easy enough".
    - If "wind kicking up snow" is a risk to a successful fire, I would recommend building a wind screen using tree branches/stacked rocks/whatever under those conditions. The added bonus is the heat-reflecting properties it provides.

    Nuff said (hopefully). Either way I'm done.

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    welcome to the forum
    If i don't get some whiskey soon i'm going to die!!!!!! didn't put eough dirt down saw it right off...

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    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sthomas View Post
    Perhaps you assume that because I only have a few posts here and you have thousands that I don't know what I'm talking about. ....
    - I've spent "hundreds" of nights outdoors without a tent or sleeping bag, and many of them were easy.
    - Countless others have spent a single night outdoors wearing proper clothing for their environment and not much else, and survived. Feel free to locate and question them all, to find out if that one night was easy or hard.
    - Refer to the Rules of 3. No one dies or is overly uncomfortable from dehydration or starvation in a single night. That leaves injury or exposure as possibilities of death or discomfort. I assert that if you're adequately prepared for those risks under whatever conditions exist at that point in time, a night outdoors is easy.
    ...- You can bet that if I plan to spend one night in -37 temps, I will be wearing Arctic clothing comfort-rated to -20 temps....along with other layers that bring that comfort-rating lower, I will go in planning to build an adequate shelter, and I will be prepared to start a fire if I find I need one. And being prepared, I'm sure I'll be able to say at the end of it that the night was "easy enough".
    - If "wind kicking up snow" is a risk to a successful fire, I would recommend building a wind screen using tree branches/stacked rocks/whatever under those conditions. The added bonus is the heat-reflecting properties it provides.

    Nuff said (hopefully). Either way I'm done.
    Uh no, that's not why I argued with your assertions, however many posts you have here have nothing to do with what any of your posts say. My guess would be that I have all those more posts because I've been around the forum longer, nothing to do with what either of us has done outdoors.

    How many of those hundreds of nights were in the climate that Jordan said he's from?

    Puh-llleeeeze don't believe what companies tell you about the "comfort rating" on their clothes, they're in the business of selling you clothes.

    When wind kicking up snow is 60k/hour and it's lower than -20 degrees good luck with your Boy Scout manual wind screen.

    I said what I said because I've spent a couple of nights outdoors myself. When a person comes here and says they are new, they read a post like your first one and come away with the conclusion "spending a night outdoors is easy"....I did say it's kind of circumstantial, I don't log in looking to flame people sthomas, and I know lots of people have survived those conditions--even without the proper gear,sometimes! (not recommended) But to most people easy=flicking channels with a remote control in a temperature controlled living room. I also said in my first post that it's always kind of circumstantial, I'll stick with that. Be aware of your circumstances.
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

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    Default thank you

    Well I would like to thank all of you guys for welcoming me to the site, Yes I do work with wareagle and I will be learning from him coming up in Feb. He's goona so me how to survive many nights in the bush with our -30 to -40 weather. So we will see how I do and how he teaches.

    Thanks again

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    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    You have chosen a great teacher in WE.
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    Senior Member RBB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sthomas View Post
    Obviously you wish to be argumentive about my assertion that "spending one night outdoors if you're properly dressed is easy". Perhaps you assume that because I only have a few posts here and you have thousands that I don't know what I'm talking about. That assumption would be wrong. I won't engage in a flame war about the topic of survival, but I do challenge you to prove that what I originally posted is flatly wrong.

    In response to your latest post on the matter;
    - I've spent "hundreds" of nights outdoors without a tent or sleeping bag, and many of them were easy.
    - Countless others have spent a single night outdoors wearing proper clothing for their environment and not much else, and survived. Feel free to locate and question them all, to find out if that one night was easy or hard.
    - Refer to the Rules of 3. No one dies or is overly uncomfortable from dehydration or starvation in a single night. That leaves injury or exposure as possibilities of death or discomfort. I assert that if you're adequately prepared for those risks under whatever conditions exist at that point in time, a night outdoors is easy.
    - I can't speak for WE, but since he's an obvious student of the survival topic I would imagine he went into that night "prepared" for it. I did see that he had a sleeping bag in his shelter, but I don't know what temp-rating his clothes or that bag were. Perhaps you should let him state whether it was "easy enough because he was adequately prepared for those conditions" or "absolutely miserable because he wasn't". Those are the only two possibilities here.
    - You can bet that if I plan to spend one night in -37 temps, I will be wearing Arctic clothing comfort-rated to -20 temps....along with other layers that bring that comfort-rating lower, I will go in planning to build an adequate shelter, and I will be prepared to start a fire if I find I need one. And being prepared, I'm sure I'll be able to say at the end of it that the night was "easy enough".
    - If "wind kicking up snow" is a risk to a successful fire, I would recommend building a wind screen using tree branches/stacked rocks/whatever under those conditions. The added bonus is the heat-reflecting properties it provides.

    Nuff said (hopefully). Either way I'm done.
    Eh, sorry. I can't agree with you. Sleeping out in minus 37 degrees is never "easy." It is survivable, yes, but never easy. I haven't spent hundreds of nights out in minus 37 degrees, but I've spent a few, and none of them were what I'd call easy.

    At those temps - even in a tent with a stove - even in a hunting shack with a stove - it is a pain in the butt.

    Have I ever done it for fun? Yes, but it is a bull-headed machismo type of fun.

    I don't care what you are wearing. In those kind of temps, you are going to have some misery. I remember a winter construction job where we were working 8 hour shifts. This was a job where I was moving around, and my circulation was good. No matter what I wore on my feet - including bunny boots and flight line boots ( I don't know of anything warmer) - I couldn't feel my feet after six hours. Thawing them out after each shift - in a pan of luke-warm water - was extremely painful.


    I don't care where you are, North Carolina, northern Minnesota, northern Ontario, or northern Alaska. If you are spending the night out in minus 37 degrees - you are a lot more concerned with getting through the night alive - than getting through the night "easy."
    Last edited by RBB; 01-24-2009 at 11:53 AM.
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