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Thread: Would you do it?

  1. #41
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    I struggled with posting the following. I feel most people will not understand but here goes.
    my father in law would put up 15 to 20 deer a year, that seems like a lot. However he had 14 children and raised a few nephews and a couple brothers. He was a oldtime farmer and would not ask for help. He didn't tramp around the south pacific in the fourties to come back here and ask for food stamps. it was the middle seventies before he put in indoor plumbing. he had no debt and payed as he went along. every fall he would go to every neighbour and make sure they had their winters wood put up and if they didn't he would start cutting. here's a guy that would be considered unethical by modern standards yet he made sure everybody had wood and meat if needed. I find it strange how times have changed.


  2. #42

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    I would have to agree Randy, Times have changed and not necessarily for the better IMO. I have No problem with what he did, There is an old-time set of "Morals" and a "New age" set, They often seem quite at odds. Funny what just 50 years will do to them. Things were much different when I was growing up than they are today.

  3. #43
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    A farmer in Indiana has the right to take animals on his property without a license (except federal duck stamps). Taking food on his farm to feed his family is a lot different (to me) than killing deer to kill them or killing for horns or even poaching on some one else's property or farm. That's just my opinion, however.

  4. #44
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Randy - honestly, I don't see anything wrong with what your father-in-law did. I don't know what the hunting regulations were, but I'd say that as you described it, it sounded like he was taking care of his family and others - not trying to enrich himself through his actions.
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  5. #45
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    I don't see what he did was wrong either. he didn't really follow any regulations but he used common sense like no shooting of does and fawns. for what it's worth my wife doesn't like venison.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    No, I wouldn't. I don't want to drone on but the financial situation described is not "someone else's" fault. If you are running that tight then you are living at or above your means. That's contrary to what you should be doing on a fiscal level. Perhaps a second or third income is needed OR you reduce expenditures to bring things back in line.

    That said, based solely on the information you provided, there are many other options available to you and your family. I'll make the assumption here that you have no financial options as outlined above. You live in a city so contact a food pantry, your church, the Salvation Army or your city or county welfare office and inquire about assistance. Talk to a game warden about harvesting a road kill deer. Those guys are pretty amiable about helping out.

    If, for whatever reason, none of that is not an option then talk to the landowner. Explain the situation and offer to clean up your mess and/or take two and butcher one for the land owner as payment. Or do some work around their property as payment.

    If they say no and there are that many deer around then there are probably abundant deer outside the city limits as well.

    I'm not black and white on the laws. There will always be exceptions but I don't think this is the case here. Not with all the other options that are available.
    When I lived in Anchorage, AK, the homeless shelters had teams that would respond to moose vs car/truck accidents. They'd all jump in a truck, drive out to the accident, jump out of the truck and fire up the chainsaws (The used vegetable oil for the chains so as not to ruin the meat). Those guys could quarter a whole moose and have it lifted up into a truck in 15 minutes.. It all went back to the shelter and they'd process the meat.

    On the other hand, the Alaskan Railroad kills over a hundred moose a year and the meat is left to rot on the sides of the tracks because most of the places don't have roads to get the teams there.

    Still, one bull moose will give you around 1,000 pounds of VERY tasty meat and can feed a lot of hungry folks for a couple of weeks.

    Some charities do it for their foodbanks as well.

    I saw a hit one time where an F250 truck ran into a moose and killed it. Truck was totaled, somehow the driver was OK. The shelter crew responded, but up the meat, hauled it off before the wrecker even got there. The wrecker driver asked "Where's the other car??"

    The worst thing about hitting a moose is when you don't hit him full on and his guts explode all over your truck. Not good for your eyes that's for sure.. Nothing like a 600lb gutsack emptying onto the front of your truck..

    Alaska averages 500 moose killed per year in car vs moose accidents..

    The Alaska Railroad kills that many a year just going from Anchorage to Seward, AK..

  7. #47

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    In Eastern North Carolina, the farmers there would let hunters hunt all over their land to try and keep the deep population down. If you didn't kill enough, they threaten to not let you hunt them anymore. Hunters there run dogs and you'll see the dogs running full bore after a deer, watch the deer run past some woods, dogs go flying behind him and within 30 seconds 4 or 5 deer would come out of those woods..

    If you went out and did some spotlighting to see where the deer were for the next days hunt, it was like fireflies on a warm summer night.. You'd think an Army was coming at you from across the field.. and that was just the ones looking your way.

    Last I heard, hunting isn't popular anymore because all the deer have moved on to happier hunting grounds..
    Last edited by crashdive123; 03-09-2021 at 07:19 AM. Reason: Restored deleted post

  8. #48
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=kl0an;521557

    Last I heard, hunting isn't popular anymore because all the deer have moved on to happier hunting grounds..[/QUOTE]

    Not so in KY. We are taking record harvests annually, hovering around 140,000 each year.

    That is the ones that get called in. Many folks don't even bother to report a kill.

    That also does not cover road kills, which averages one per every mile of interstate during the rut. Honest, I was driving 5 miles to the grocery store last fall and counted 6 deer dead on the shoulder.

    I remember a conversation I had with a neighbor a while back. I was leaving the house and he was standing on the edge of the road looking at a dead deer. I knew what he was contemplating and I stopped.

    "Jim," I says, "that deer was not there when I came home last night and the temperature has not been over 35 degrees all night. That right there is 100 pounds of freezer meat!"

    We drug the deer into his garage and he brought me a roast latter.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  9. #49
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    I've heard it said that there are more deer in North America today than there were when Columbus arrived. The reason being is that there is more "edge" for them to live in. There is plenty for them to eat and The only real natural predators they have only come out during deer season.

    I knew a guy who regularly killed +/- 30 deer each year and he lived and hunted in the suburbs. They were all deer fattened on expensive landscaping plants. He used a bow.

    Dead deer on the highway is a common sight down here. I don't know of anyone who picks it up because it is usually pretty warm, even in winter.

    In some counties the limit is 5 deer and in agricultural areas depredation permits can be had. On large ranches where high intensity QDM is practiced they shoot lots of does. #1 son worked as a guide for a big ranch south of San Antonio. Each guide was given 125 doe permits they were expected to fill each year. It was part of their job. They would bring the deer in field dressed and the trucks would run daily to charitable kitchens in SA.

    In Texas, if you live on your own property you can take deer you need for food with no restrictions as long as none of it ever leaves the property. A hunting license was not even necessary. (This was in the past. I am not current on regulations in this regard)

    Is it immoral or unethical to put up as many deer as are needed by a family to be fed for a year if none of it is wasted? No. It may be illegal though and that's where the problems start and end.

    There are other aspects of hunting and fishing that I find immoral or unethical. Doing it for food is not one of them.

    Alan

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