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Thread: why camo?

  1. #81
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    LOL, OK, OK, it looks pretty good.
    A good Pendleton wool shirt or coat was/is a treasure, but I'm sure you know that.

    Have one of my fathers, still, has the buckskin elbows.
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  2. #82
    Senior Member aflineman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    LOL, OK, OK, it looks pretty good.
    A good Pendleton wool shirt or coat was/is a treasure, but I'm sure you know that.

    Have one of my fathers, still, has the buckskin elbows.
    They are a treasure to me, for personal reasons. The man who taught me the most about the woods and the outdoors worked at the Woolen Mills there in Pendleton, Oregon for many years. Just seems right to wear something of that vintage that he helped make the cloth for, when I am hunting. This one belonged to my Grandfather, and Rex made the cloth for it. Makes it very special to me.
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  3. #83
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    You know, AF, I get it. I have my grandmother's shoe, some of my mom's blouses and my dads shirt and hats. I have no idea why I still have them but they are comforting to look at from time to time. Brings back some good memories.

  4. #84

    Thumbs up Camo. . . .Mother Nature's Full Of It!

    Mother Nature offers everything you need for camo. Why would anyone BUY camo when they can make their own?

    Mud, leaves, twigs, branches, everything you need for camo, if you need camo?!

    There is no animal in nature that is "camoflagued". An animals coloring along with natural light and surrounding colors lends to making an animal "invisible", so-to-speak.

    A humans eyes are not adept at seeing things in nature as an animals eyes are. After all, animals live in natural habitat day-in and day-out 24/7, 365, where things in their world are more of a vertical nature, with all-encompassing natural 'alarming' sounds. Birds, squirrels, chipmunks, etc. Humans live in a more industrious "city" settings, where things are more horizontal nature with a blending of vertical structures, and loud un-natural noises.

    The aboriginal peoples of this continent lived side-by-side with the animals. Intricately learning their movement and patterns. Being able to spot an animal from a long way off, because they (the aborigines) were so in-tune with the animals and their behaviors.

    Now, if a person learns how to get 'inside' an animals natural defenses they should have no problem obtaining their quarry of choice.

    1.) Keeping downwind of their keen sense of smell
    2.) Not making any unusually loud noises
    3.) Controlling your breathing
    4.) Moving slowly and methodically
    5.) Knowing an animals daily path of travel

    Practicing these 5 things, there is no need for man-made camo. A wool coat and pants are the best for hunting, or anything else, no matter what the color or plaid pattern!

    As I said: "Mother Nature offers everything you need for camo."
    Everything I have posted is pure fantasy. I have not done any of the things that I have claimed to have done in my posts. I actually live in Detroit.

  5. #85
    a bushbaby owl_girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Some northern states require orange for gun deer hunting.

    Now considering, in Wisconsin, there are something like 650,000 to 800,000 people in the woods, with all kinds of auto-loading, high powered rifles and shotguns, I agree that being able to see other people is a plus.

    I purposely said "people" rather than "Hunters", lots of "Opening day, once a years participants, that I try to stay away from.

    Some states require an orange hat, hat and vest, or just vest, it's better than nothing.
    Even though a lot of states require orange something or other, they don't have any punishment for not having it.

    I mostly wear all orange, but does have a pattern on it, whether it is visible to deer or not, hasn't seemed to matter.
    Sitting still and doing your scouting home work seems to work for me, no matter what I wear.

    As I said before, most "camo" is for people, and a marketing thing rather than hunting necessity, unless you count not getting shot.

    I have worn my "all orange suit" in other states, been laughed at by hunting partners, but generally do pretty well as far a results go.

    And you want to look cool in the saloons..............He who has the coolest camo ...wins!
    yea i know its a law in some places. my point is just why wear camo if you wear an orange vest. your not able to blend in anymore anyways.
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  6. #86
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by owl_girl View Post
    yea i know its a law in some places. my point is just why wear camo if you wear an orange vest. your not able to blend in anymore anyways.
    Why not?
    Bright colored out door gear is just not done while hunting.
    Says in "The Book".
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  7. #87
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    I don't hunt, but I do wear camo on occasion. Just old work clothes (woodland and desert) that are comfortable and durable.
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    I wonder if that is Owl Girl the girl.......or Owl Girl the Boyfriend.....

  9. #89
    a bushbaby owl_girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Why not?
    Bright colored out door gear is just not done while hunting.
    Says in "The Book".
    if they are wearing an orange vest they are already wearing a bright color. and i didnt say they should wear bright colors. jeans and a gray shirt maybe. its kinda like a ninja wearing black at night but having an orange vest with reflectors on it to ovoid getting ran over. although the vest is a good idea to keep from getting ran over it defeats the purpose of not being seen so why bother wearing all black? it looks silly to me to see something so contradictory. does that make sense?
    Last edited by owl_girl; 02-06-2010 at 05:01 PM.
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  10. #90
    a bushbaby owl_girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sourdough View Post
    I wonder if that is Owl Girl the girl.......or Owl Girl the Boyfriend.....
    why?.......
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  11. #91

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    An orange vest isn't as likely to alarm a deer as a easily seen human.

    The red and black plaid was designed to break up the pattern.
    Man using camo is a clothing is a relatively new thing. It helps to break up your outline.

    It is not going to guarantee anything and you can decide not to use it or scent technology or masks. It is just a tool.

    I'll tell you what though, its one of those things you can stain the hell out of and noone cares. LOL

    Lots of animals are camoflauged. Anyone who has ever seen a sandhill crane chick run across a field and stop. They rely so heavily on their camo that you can walk up and tap them with your boot. Usually would have to tap them a couple of times before they bolt.

    Deer fawn are spotted to break up their pattern.

    Ever seen a chuck-will's-widow. Hard to say that bird ain't camoflagued.

    Octopus, moths or what about geckos. Take a look at this link...

    http://izismile.com/2009/10/23/amazi...e_18_pics.html

  12. #92
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Well, on the other hand, I can recall a duck/goose hunting day, in a very well canoed blind with all the latest (at the time) camo clothing, we were calling to a flock of geese.

    We turned them, but as they approached they flared a bit, set their wings and landed on the other side of the lake.

    Waiting on the shore was an older lady with a pink bathrobe, with one of those pink fluffy hair things on her head.
    She had a couple of bags of the local "Day old" bread, and as they were walking up on shore to get their treat, we were wondering what are WE thinking?

    Another thing I always wondered about was the story that the original camo was wearing hides of your prey.

    That I can believe, but the fringed buckskin hunting shirts/pants/leggings, the fringe supposably to break up your silhouette, I tend to not believe so much.

    If you ever tried sneaking/ walking/ running thru brambles, bushes with fringed clothing you will soon find yourself really tangled up.

    As a lot of fringed buckskin clothes are made and sold this way, I suspect it is also a old marketing ploy as well as todays camo clothing.

    BTW my buckshin "war shirts" and pants have fringes, but they are more for show.

    A pair of buckskin legging I made with the intention of fringing them, thought better of it and just left the flaps uncut.
    Do work very well in rough cover, brambles, brush etc.
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  13. #93
    Senior Member aflineman's Avatar
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    Other than the wet weather qualities, one other thing that has sold me on wool (again), is how it just sheds the brambles. I had forgotten that until I started wearing it again. The pants that I have work so much better than jeans, and after I leave the brambles I don't keep getting stuck, like I do with jeans.
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  14. #94
    Senior Member Ole WV Coot's Avatar
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    I thought fringe on buckskins originated as handy thingys to tie or mend with, about a foot long just a little before my time.
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  15. #95

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    I have been thinking about this since I first read this thread, what if Im in the city when the SHTF and I need to be as stelthy as possible against a concret and glass back drop my woodland and desert camo would stick out like a sore thum so I figure I would start throwing this in my truck as my urban camo set up.




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  16. #96
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    There is a lot of truth to that, welderguy. If you're slinking down my street all decked out in camo just after the stuff rolls over the oscillator then I have a pretty good idea what you're up to. On the other hand, if you're wearing a kilt, you're guaranteed that I'll leave you alone.

  17. #97
    Very interesting... mcgyver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aflineman View Post
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    So far the wool has not bled the dye. I have had it out a few times and it has worked well.
    That's a fine Fine job! Looks Great.
    I'll bet yer Grand Dad is proud.
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  18. #98
    Very interesting... mcgyver's Avatar
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    Why Not Camo?
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  19. #99

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    Camo is to hide from people, noise and smell discipline will hide you from animals.

    If your mismatched you will stick out from a trained scout. Movement and noise are a give away.

    Quote Originally Posted by oneraindog View Post
    i do like the idea of a ghillie suit.
    Make one, and wear it for a day, wait until its raining. You will change your mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by oneraindog View Post
    you guys have made some awesome suggestions but what about waterproof? the wool thing is fantastic i know. stays warm when wet. but the northwest is a whole other kind of wet. waterproof would be really nice.
    .
    A poncho over your wool blanket coat and your set. I carry both when I travel the Cascade Crest trail. Both are light weight, and very warm and water proof. We do use woodland ponchos, because they are surplus.
    We have snow pattern also.

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