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  1. #41
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I have that, too. Don't forget that you can put a water bladder in it if you want.


  2. #42
    Senior Member el-amigo's Avatar
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    After using it some days, it is a very good and durable bag. I like it! Yes, there is a water pocket at its back panel.
    Everybody has a different way to view the world...

  3. #43
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    I am new to the forum I am really enjoying it so far lots of great stuff. I would add to this topic .I recently renewed my concealed to carry here in the great state of texas and someone asked which gun is the best to carry for self defense. the instructor answered the gun you feel the most confident and comfortable with. The equipmeant you carry. I do a lot of carpentry work and I swing a 22oz. hammer all day lots of people that would be to much hammer. they might want to drop down to a 16oz. I guess i am just saying wht someone else has allready said but you need to try severl things compare there differences and acces your proficincie with different items
    .

  4. #44
    Senior Member Celticwarrior's Avatar
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    Survival Manual: How to Stay Alive in the Woods by Bradford Angier or Outdoor Survival Skills by Larry Dean Olsen

    Shelter: 2 Person Backpack Tent (Sierra 4 season Convert)

    Fire starting: Flint and Steel + Magnesium Bar w/Flint & Shaver/striker

    Water treatment: Filter/Boil (Manual). Chemical backup with Katadyn Micropur Tabs.

    First Aid: Homemade (combo of Red Cross recommendations, Military field medic kit, surgical and wound closure kit, and assorted trail meds like afterbite, benadryl, hydrocort cream, aspirin, quikclot, sunscreen, bug dope, glucose tabs, ipecac, activated charcoal, imodium and bismol tabs, stool softeners, eye and dental emergency care, dramamine, etc.


    Signaling: Crank/Solar/Battery flashlight with red strobe and alarm feature. Backup: Storm pea-less whistle

    Cutting tools: Machete (brush) and pocket chainsaw (wood)

    Fixed Knife: Kukri

    Folding Knife: Victorinox Swiss Champ SAK

    Multi-tool: Leatherman Wave

    Navigation: Compass (Lensatic) and star navigation

    Firearms:
    Handguns: Glock or H&K VP70z

    Shotgun: Remington 870 12

    Rifle: Remington 700 (30-06)
    "A free citizenry should never abide a government that seeks control over it's people rather than service to them"

  5. #45
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    i am new but im really enjoying these type of things =)

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebel View Post
    Due to the variables and different scenarios it's not a perfect list. Folks will have to use their common sense as to what they use and when they use it.

    I thought it might help the new person in putting together some equipment. For example, if I were new to survival I might start with a manual and from looking at this list I would probably go with the Army survival manual. For fire starting I would want a fire steel, lighter and matches. For water treatment: A Katadyn or MSR with chemical back-up. Boiling may be an option.

    I hope that helps to clarify the reasoning.
    AWESOME and well put! Great reminder that we wall started off small and now some of us are falling over equipment and IDEA's for new and better!

  7. #47
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    Just curious, but would it be feasible to assemble a "suit" like a hazmat suit using emergency blanket for interior lining and rain poncho material on the external, to serve in cooler climates? I've been somewhat thoughtful towards it and might even try to make something like that. obviously not using solely a sewing kit heh..

  8. #48
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenfox View Post
    Just curious, but would it be feasible to assemble a "suit" like a hazmat suit using emergency blanket for interior lining and rain poncho material on the external, to serve in cooler climates? I've been somewhat thoughtful towards it and might even try to make something like that. obviously not using solely a sewing kit heh..
    There ya, go....sounds like a project to me.....
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  9. #49

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    Yea, that would be something to do while you're waiting to be rescued!
    Wilderness Survival:
    Surviving a temporary situation where you're lost in the wilderness

  10. #50
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    You can purchase tyvek coveralls for $6 bucks each. All white so it blends in with snow. You could slip it on over your clothes. I don't know how rugged they are however.

    http://www.uline.com/BL_982/Tyvek-Protective-Clothing

  11. #51
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    Just keep in mind that if you do use Tyvek suits (I use them a lot for work) that they do not breath at all. Be mindful of sweating.
    Can't Means Won't

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  12. #52
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    Oh well, Oooooh. Stinky. Scratch that idea.

  13. #53

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    Great job.

    I too think the Mora is The fixed blade knife to carry. I even carry it in my daily lunch bag.

  14. #54
    I'll bring the bacon!!! 802OutdoorsLLC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebel View Post
    The WSF members equipment poll results. First, I want to thank you for your participation. I know I have learned from you and I’m sure other folks will too. This will hopefully be a tool for those wanting to know which piece of gear they should consider. This may help someone with their time and resources instead of the trial and error method. They can also look up the polls and see who posted on the particular piece of equipment and perhaps pm you with questions.

    The following topics have been numbered from highest to lowest by the number of members who chose the same equipment.

    Survival Manual: 1. Army Survival Guide.
    2. Outdoor Survival Skills and SAS Manual.

    Shelter: 1. Tent (Marmot Twilight 2p or undisclosed).
    2. Tarp or Poncho.
    3. Bivy bag.
    4. Hammock (Hennessy Explorer Deluxe).

    Fire starting: 1. Fire Steel (Blast match, Strike force, Swedish).
    2. Lighter (BIC).
    3. Matches.
    4. Flint and Steel.
    5. Torch sparker and Doan tool.

    Water treatment: 1. Chemical (Katadyn, Chlorine tabs, Clorox bleach). It was
    the common back-up method, that’s why it was #1.
    2. Katadyn (Combi, Hiker).
    3. MSR (Miniworks, Sweetwater).
    4. Homemade.

    First Aid: 1. Home made kits.
    2. Commercial base (Gov. Surplus, Johnsons & Johnsons, Wilderness Adventure).

    Signaling: 1. Whistle.
    2. Cell phone and mirror.
    3. Flash light.
    4. Radio
    5. Light stick and Fire.
    6. Weapon
    7. Flare and Lighter.

    Cutting tools: 1. Hatchet (Estwing Sportsman, Sears Craftsman) and
    Machete (Ontario, Corneta).
    2. Saw (Gerber). Tomahawk (Allen Foundry “Frontier”,
    Cold Steel “Trail Hawk”). Chainsaw ( Husquavarna,
    Stihl).
    3. Shovel (Spetznaz).

    Fixed Knife: 1. Mora (780).
    2. Kabar (USMC).
    3. Home made, RAT (SERE, Izula, RC3), Buck (Nighthawk).
    4. Camillus (Pilot Survival).
    5. Tops (Tom Brown Tracker), Kershaw (Outcast), Benchmade (Bushmaster), Ranger (Rd7), Spyderco (Forager), Cold Steel (SRK, Master Hunter, Mini Pendelton Hunter), Becker Necker (bkII), Bark Rivers (Bravo 1), Livesay’s ( Air Assault).

    Folding Knife: 1. Victorinox (Farmer, Recruit, Fieldmaster, Soldier).
    2. Buck (110/ Folding Hunter, Buck Lite), CRKT (M-21, Crawford Falcon, M-16-13M)
    3. Spyderco, Katana, Kershaw (Black Horse II, Blur),
    4. Emerson (CQC7), Imperial, Ontario (Jump Master), Byrd (Cara Cara), Katana Strider (SnG), SOG (Twitch).

    Multi-tool: 1. Leatherman (Wave, PST, Charge Ti, Original).
    2. Gerber (T3, MPT).
    3. Winchester and Victorinox.

    Navigation: 1. Compass ( Silva 515CL , 515CLQ and A-10, Recta DP2,
    Gov. Surplus Lensatic).
    2. Back-up type compasses (pin-on and button).
    3. GPS (Garmin 12 and E-trex, Lowrance).

    Firearms:
    Handguns: 1. Ruger Single Six.
    2. 357 (Redhawk, Taurus, undisclosed).
    3. Walther P-22, Glock (.40 , undisclosed),
    4. Ruger MKIII, H & R M-929, Beretta Cougar 45, X-40, Ruger black powder (.44), Ruger (SR-9), Bersa (.380).

    Shotgun: 1. Mossy 500. Remington 870 12 and 20 Ga.
    2. Winchester Defender and 1300.
    3. Remington 1100, H & R Single (12 Ga.), Savage M24C (.22LR / 20 Ga.), Ithaca 37, Valmet 412 (12/70).

    Rifle: 1. Ruger 10-22, AR-15 (5.56 / 6.5 Grendel).
    2. Marlin 336 ( 30-30), Ruger ( M77), Remington 700 (30-06), Ruger(Mini-14 and 30), AK.
    3. Winchester Mdl 70 (270), Remington 700 ( 308), Springfield M6 (.22LR / .410 Ga.), Savage M24C (.22LR / 20 Ga.), Highpoint 995 (9 mm), Blackpowder Plains rifle (.54), Weatherby (30-06), Saiga (.223), Sako (.308), Glenfield 18, .22hw80k, Remington 742 (30-06).

    I am new here to this forum, but not to forums in general or these types of topics. I perused this list and the thread and I'd like to offer some alternative items that I think all should have in their BOB/backpack:
    - The book 'Where There is no Doctor'.
    - The book 'Where There is no Dentist'.
    - 'Hawke's Green Beret Survival Manual' and/or 'Hawke's Special Forces Survival Handbook'.

    and in my opinion, two largest overlooked 'kits':

    - a dental/oral hygiene daily care and first aid kit for the mouth. This is by far one of the most overlooked preps. Look at how many people you know that do not take care of their mouth and teeth now. Few understand the host of fatal events that can occur because of a simple impacted tooth and/or cavity.
    - Laxatives and diarrhea management items. Long term hiking, bushcrafting, survival scenarios has the potential to wreak havoc on the digestive system. We all
    know this. Build a kit that contains fiber gummies, Exlax, mineral oil, Ducolax, and the like. A severe bout of constipation can cause a fatality in many ways. The same for a bout of diarrhea. Diarrhea in the wild can cause dehydration, not to mention deplete your stores of fresh/available of H2O. In your kit throw in anti-diarrhea agents such as Kaopectate Multi Symptom Relief Tablets, available at any Rx store OTC.

    To me, I view the books not so much for myself, but for someone that may stumble across me & find me weak and possibly dying. I can guide them to certain chapters that I think are applicable for the condition they find me in.

    The Dental & Digestive Health kit is as important to me as my water purification/gathering methods and shelter skills. I don't know about you, but when I'm 'bound' up, I'm miserable and unproductive. The same when I am suffering the 'runs'. At home we're relatively safe with available resources, in the wild tho', either condition can be fatal.

    Just my thoughts/contributions to the thread. As always, YMMV.
    "Life's hard. It's harder when you're stupid."
    - Credited to John Wayne, Robert Mitchum, Dean Martin, et al.

  15. #55
    Member Lil K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 802OutdoorsLLC View Post
    I am new here to this forum, but not to forums in general or these types of topics.

    and in my opinion, two largest overlooked 'kits':

    - a dental/oral hygiene daily care and first aid kit for the mouth. This is by far one of the most overlooked preps. Look at how many people you know that do not take care of their mouth and teeth now. Few understand the host of fatal events that can occur because of a simple impacted tooth and/or cavity.
    - Laxatives and diarrhea management items. Long term hiking, bushcrafting, survival scenarios has the potential to wreak havoc on the digestive system. We all
    know this. Build a kit that contains fiber gummies, Exlax, mineral oil, Ducolax, and the like. A severe bout of constipation can cause a fatality in many ways. The same for a bout of diarrhea. Diarrhea in the wild can cause dehydration, not to mention deplete your stores of fresh/available of H2O. In your kit throw in anti-diarrhea agents such as Kaopectate Multi Symptom Relief Tablets, available at any Rx store OTC.

    To me, I view the books not so much for myself, but for someone that may stumble across me & find me weak and possibly dying. I can guide them to certain chapters that I think are applicable for the condition they find me in.

    The Dental & Digestive Health kit is as important to me as my water purification/gathering methods and shelter skills. I don't know about you, but when I'm 'bound' up, I'm miserable and unproductive. The same when I am suffering the 'runs'. At home we're relatively safe with available resources, in the wild tho', either condition can be fatal.
    #1: Welcome to the Forums!

    #2: I agree 100%! In my opinion, taking very good care of your mouth and eyes are extremely important. Your eyes are kind of obvious, but your mouth is so crucial when surviving in the wilderness. Imagine you are taking a bite out of this mornings game and you crack a tooth on the bone... WHAT NOW? You are basically screwed unless you are traveling with a dentist or know a lot about oral/tooth reconstruction haha.
    If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.

  16. #56
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    Great Minds really do think alike! I was amazed how many of my long time (some I have carried for 15-20 yrs), standard, go to items are listed in 1 or 2 place.

  17. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by rebel View Post
    Firearms:
    Handguns: 1. Ruger Single Six.
    2. 357 (Redhawk, Taurus, undisclosed).
    3. Walther P-22, Glock (.40 , undisclosed),
    4. Ruger MKIII, H & R M-929, Beretta Cougar 45, X-40, Ruger black powder (.44), Ruger (SR-9), Bersa (.380).
    A lot of you guys have more experience than I do so it was comforting to see most of my picks made the list. In fact, mostly number one, always better than the bottom. Except the hand gun. I go with the 1911 .45ACP. Why wasn't that chosen? It's no heavier than some of the ones on the list and the capacity is similar or better.

    If I'm missing something, please clue me in.

  18. #58
    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anozira View Post
    A lot of you guys have more experience than I do so it was comforting to see most of my picks made the list. In fact, mostly number one, always better than the bottom. Except the hand gun. I go with the 1911 .45ACP. Why wasn't that chosen? It's no heavier than some of the ones on the list and the capacity is similar or better.
    If I'm missing something, please clue me in.
    Might want to re-research that. It will answer your question.
    ”There's nothing glorious in dying. Anyone can do it.” ~Johnny Rotten

  19. #59

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    I appreciate the reply. I don't want to be argumentative; I'm here to learn. But of the ones I have access to to weigh:

    Ruger Single Six, .22, 5 ˝” – 33 oz, 6 rounds
    Ruger Mark I, .22 4" – 34 oz, 9+1 rounds
    Ruger Blackhawk .357 Mag, 4 5”8” – 40 oz, 6 rounds
    AVERAGE - 35.7 oz
    1911A1 45ACP, 5” – 38.4 oz, 7+1 rounds

    That's with magazine but no ammo. I'm using the Mark I to stand in for the Mark III and the SA Blackhawk to stand in for the DA Redhawk in the survey.

    Either .22 LR beats either of the heavier calibers by 4 or 5 ounces. Blackhark is marginally heavier than the 1911.

    I would understand arguments that the revolver is simpler with less to break or need adjustment than a semi. Likewise one can argue that there is a version of the Ruger revolvers that comes with two cylinders for ammo versatility - .22LR and .22Mag and for 9mm/.38/.357.

    I'm curious what reason the people that rejected the 1911 had for that choice.

  20. #60
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    My go to are similar to the list as well....but I don't consider the 1911 .45 an ideal foraging and woods self protection firearm.
    My main reason for the list.......
    If strictly for self protection, 2 legged.... a auto loader pistol could be .9mm, 40 mm, .45 but would opted for a double stack.

    I gonna say my choices are not all weight related....but more to versatility.
    Your mileage may vary, and your choices are arrived at, for your reasons....no problem with that.

    The is no wrong answer, and this is a discussion, not an argument...so your opinion is as good as any one else's.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
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    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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