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Thread: pine needle tea

  1. #21
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I sure hope she doesn't get ineb....eneb...drunk as a sock.


  2. #22
    Crazy Coonass catfish10101's Avatar
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    The word is eeneebreeated. LOL!!!

  3. #23
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catfish10101 View Post
    The word is eeneebreeated. LOL!!!
    The last time I did that I was not as drunk as some tinkle might peep.
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  4. #24
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Did you say....tinkle?

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  5. #25
    Senior Member postman's Avatar
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    Kinda like the taste myself, especially balsam fir. Also has good medicinal properties, and the sap makes great wound dressing as well as fire starter. Must be a Canadian thing.

  6. #26
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Hey there Postman. Neither rain nor sleet nor gloom of night should keep you from stopping by the Introduction section and tell us a bit about yourself. Thanks. http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...splay.php?f=14
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  7. #27
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    I personally love pine needle tea. It tastes good to me, and the health benefits are great! However, make sure you don't take needles from the yew tree. It's poisonous. Just my $0.02.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Old GI's Avatar
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    Oh, you're supposed to take the needles out, not ....... ???
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  9. #29
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    White pine, not bad... Longleaf pines from FL... Just flat out pine-sol. Hence the reason if I do drink it, it never gets cut or broken, and I typically prefer it cold with a sweeter plant in there with it.
    Not all who wander are lost...

  10. #30
    Senior Member Winnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I sure hope she doesn't get ineb....eneb...drunk as a sock.
    Just seen this and I resemble that remark! I'll have you know my week in France was a purely fact-finding and educational tour of the regional differences in French wine.
    I didn't get guttered once. It was at least 5 times

    As for tea, fruit teas good, raspberry leaf tea really good, blackberry leaf tea good, tea, tea essential to life. Pine needle tea? doesn't sound like my cup of tea
    Recession; A period when you go without something your Grandparents never heard of.

  11. #31
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Ooh. Try it. You will like it. It leaves a very clean taste in your mouth. Tops on my list. Tons of Vitamin C, too.

  12. #32

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    i agree, not a very tasty drink. I've drank it a couple times, but its one of those things i'll add to the knowledge vault. If i'm ever in a survival sitiuation and need a hot drink, then i'll use it.

  13. #33

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    Man! I don't think you guys are making it correctly. If you only boil it for a few minutes, then ya, it's more of an acquired taste. You're supposed to bring it to a boil and then let it simmer until it turns reddish. That's when it's good, and does not taste anything like the sappy taste many of you have described. For it to turn reddish, it can take anywhere from an hour to over-night (just keep adding water). Mind you, you will have a much lower vitamin C content in the reddish stage, but still lots of it. I find that in the pre-red stage there is TOO much vitamin C for my liking, so I redden it. Everybody who tries it that way say it's quite good.

    On a side note, 5 years ago I decided to go the natural route and stopped taking flue shots. I drink a cup or two of this every day, and have not gotten a cold or flue since. I live in north-eastern Canada where colds and flu are as common as snow, just so ya know.
    Last edited by Stroover; 12-03-2009 at 05:57 PM.

  14. #34
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Hey Stroover - how about simmering on over to the Introduction section and tell us a bit about yourself. Thanks. http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...splay.php?f=14
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  15. #35
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroover
    5 years ago I decided to go the natural route
    And what was the natural route...oh yea, death.

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    And what was the natural route...oh yea, death.
    Rick, are you sure you want to be in a "survivalist" forum? Or do you consider "surviving" to be part of the modern world ways? As a matter of fact, if most are of your opinion, I think I'M in the wrong forum.

  17. #37
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    Chill. It's called pulling your chain. Banter. We do that around here. If you can't survive the forum you certainly won't survive out there. See how that works?

  18. #38
    Senior Member oneraindog's Avatar
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    Mind you, you will have a much lower vitamin C content in the reddish stage
    i dont know will you have ANY vitamin c? i was under the impression that vit C is destroyed at a certain temperature. not SOME OF it but all of it so you dont want to cook anything for vitamin c benefit for too long on too high heat.
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  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by oneraindog View Post
    i dont know will you have ANY vitamin c? i was under the impression that vit C is destroyed at a certain temperature. not SOME OF it but all of it so you dont want to cook anything for vitamin c benefit for too long on too high heat.
    Then how do you explain how the native people saved Champlain's settlement in 1604 from all dying of scurvy by showing them how to make pine needle tea on St-Croix Island between New Brunswick and Maine? It was their only source of vitamin C at the time during winter months. By the time the native people showed up, over half of the settlers had died of scurvy. The rest learned how to make the tea by "boiling pine needles in water" and they managed to survive the rest of the winter. Explain that...
    Last edited by Stroover; 12-07-2009 at 10:33 AM.

  20. #40
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Well, not entirely true. The inner bark of the Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus) is also loaded with Vitamin C and quite edible. The indigenous folks were often called "bark eaters" by early explorers because it was a very common part of their diet. I don't doubt that tea was a source of their Vitamin C as well but the largest portion came from actually eating the inner bark or Phloem of the tree.

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