Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst ... 45678 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 162

Thread: Best survival radio communications systems....????

  1. #101

    Cool

    Mods for Yaesu VX-6R.

    Here are some modifications to talk on 137 174, 222 230, and 420 469 frequencies with the VX-6R.

    http://www.halfzware.com/wordpress/2.../19/vx-6r-mods

    Also some other mods for better TX and better sound.
    http://www.mods.dk/index.php?ModelId=822&RadioRec=yaesu

    I modified my Yeasu about a year ago and it works, able to talk on all those frequencies (except I don't mess with police or military frequencies), but it allows you more options of whom you can talk to.

    Enjoy.
    Born to be Free.
    Be prepared to Survive Everything.
    Urban/Homestead/EMP/Health/Disaster Survival Preparedness Forum:
    http://www.bsoscblog/forum/


  2. #102
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,832

    Default

    I'm not sure I understand the need. If it's something you want to do then okay. With several bands that I CAN talk on and several more common (AM, FM, Weather) that I can receive I, personally, have everything I need. The purpose for me is to have the ability to know what's going on in an emergency and to be be able to call for help when in the woods if I have to. The factory model does all that for me and I'm not taking the risk of hosing up an expensive piece of equipment. Just my point of view. But thanks for the links.

  3. #103

    Cool

    The reasons can be anything from using lower channels which do not require a license to talk on to even being able to communicate with law enforcement during a disaster, since if you have an emergency you can use all frequencies except military to call for help on even without a license. Since any emergency even those who do not have a license can talk on HAM radio stations to call for help. Those are just a few reasons to have the modification, which is useful for me since I live off the grid and miles from anyone else, my neighbor is over a mile away. There are many on this forum who probably have similar circumstances in which they live away from everyone else, so having alternative ways to communicate is nice to have on hand. At least it is for me.

    As for the lower frequencies that do not require a license (there are also stations in the HAM range that do not require a license) I use these to frequently talk to friends since I do not even get cell phone reception here.
    Since the CB is not capable of reaching many of my friends who live several cities over, the HAM is great to use in those cases on those frequencies, but also I do have my license for HAM and I can use the others as well. It is just a case of preference, but it does make a difference to me and some others.
    Just great to have it all ready on hand.
    Born to be Free.
    Be prepared to Survive Everything.
    Urban/Homestead/EMP/Health/Disaster Survival Preparedness Forum:
    http://www.bsoscblog/forum/

  4. #104
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,832

    Default

    Gotcha. That would be a situation of anything that's usable.

  5. #105
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Paoli, PA
    Posts
    394

    Default answers to many questions

    Quote Originally Posted by SARKY View Post
    Just get a good shortwave radio transciever. In a scenario as you describe all bets are off for licenses.....you don't need one. If it were for normal everyday/no emergency use, you would need a license. Remember though, the antenna is the key to good transmission and reception. Most of the radios on the market are similar but there are different antenna set ups that you can use, that is where to do your research.
    The licence like a car licence is there to prevent you from blowing it up. You become knowledgable to avoid mismatchs and electricution.

    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    Can't say for sure - but I don't think you need a license for VHF.
    YES you do need one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sourdough View Post
    I am on a Mountain and can see 50 miles. How much does a HAM Radio cost....???
    2nd hand and $400 and you don't need a mountain - VOA is in a cowfield.

    Quote Originally Posted by HOSSFLY View Post
    Does Ham work off a repeater system or radio to radio like a C.B does? In a bad case most repeaters would be down due to power failures unless on a backup generator.
    Repeaters are cool but not nessary. CB does not use repeaters, it works on ionized air called skip. VHF and UHF use repeaters on some freq to involve lower power and greater range.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    HAM was KA1BGH. Like a dummy, I allowed it to expire.
    ME too.

    Quote Originally Posted by homejoy View Post
    Hello, I started a thread called Personal Locater Beacons and someone kindly directed me here. We have a lake access, off grid cabin on a small lake in Canada about 30 miles from the nearest town. There are a few neighbors on the other side of the lake but only one we can see and those folks don't seem to be home much. We have a friend who lives on the other side of that house, behind a hill. There is usually someone home there and they would call SAR or come to our rescue. There are no roads on our side and no houses, either.

    PLB/s are way better

    I am looking for a way to call for SAR help in case of emergency. The local head paramedic suggested an iridium sat phone but that's overkill in terms of price as we are not at the cabin all that often. The new Fast Find 210 PLB is now cleared for Canada and costs under $300. We travel quite a bit so it could come in handy in other parts of the globe, too.

    Or would radio phones make sense for us? Would we have to put up an antenna for ourselves and one at the top of our friend's hill? There also is a road with fairly frequent trucks going by to the nearby gas and oil fields so they might also pick up a radio call. I don't know, it sounds iffy to me.

    click here

    Quote Originally Posted by UnknownWarrior View Post
    Does that mean I can use a HAM radio without a license in emergencies? Be it any country or that's just for the U.S.?
    You can - only because in the past it was unenforceable some years... during a war time build up the FCC becomes involved, very serious! Otherwise neighborhood HAM operators will turn you in or fine you if you are caught without a licence during non emergencies.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I've been giving this some thought (which is hugely dangerous) and I've decided that a hand held CB might not be a bad thing to have along on a hike. If you don't have cell service you might still be able to use the CB. You can buy used ones pretty darned cheap. Might make some inexpensive insurance.

    Thoughts?
    Honest - Very impractical - check out the link for spot.

    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Case View Post
    Who Cares about a License in a survival situation ? I don't, I would get a good Yeasu Ham rig ,,, you dont need a License to listen anyway, With the right Ham radio you can cover EMS also,
    I didn't either - but some of my freinds got 10k fines.

    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    I did a trade today (it's in the mail anyway) on a couple of hand held CB's.
    great. check out spot too.


    There was an Old Man with a owl,
    Who continued to bother and howl;
    He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
    Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.
    .WOO

  6. #106
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    38,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    The SPOT system is not something that I woudl choose. If it works for you, then it works for me.
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  7. #107
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    38,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    On the VHF radio thing....for marine use, or EPIRB use, a license is not required (yes, there are some restrictions) - Telecommunications Act of 1996.
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  8. #108
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Paoli, PA
    Posts
    394

    Default

    tough call but I am sure if two people used a marine radio other than marine use - which I have never detected, The FCC would be pretty quick to shut it down. Might take a few months...


    There was an Old Man with a owl,
    Who continued to bother and howl;
    He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
    Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.
    .WOO

  9. #109
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Paoli, PA
    Posts
    394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    The SPOT system is not something that I woudl choose. If it works for you, then it works for me.
    Keep in mind you only need half of spot the GPS is for sending text back home by bluetooth. Homejoy was looking for a eme device to get ems.


    There was an Old Man with a owl,
    Who continued to bother and howl;
    He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
    Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.
    .WOO

  10. #110
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southern NH, USA
    Posts
    64

    Default

    In response to the note that suggested getting a ham radio and not getting a license. A ham radio license isn't that hard to get if you have average intelligence. I would encourage you to get the study manual that the ARRL publishes, read though it, check out the questions from the actual test (they give you all the questions that could be on the test plus the answers) and then get the license. The reason I encourage you to get your license is because communicating via radio isn't as simple as turning it on and pressing the button on the mic. There's a lot more to it than that. In addition, any HF rig that is not an HT (walkie talkie) is probably capable of putting out enough energy through the antenna to cause injury should you not know what you're doing.

    Think of it this way: Would you buy a gun and never use it until an actual emergency arose? Of course not. Learning to use a piece of eqipment is all about practice. Given that, what makes you think that buying a 2 way radio and not using it or even learning HOW to set it up is any different? You do need to have at least a base core of knowledge you know. The old adage is practice makes perfect. This is especially true if you are considering using the radio in a situation where power isn't just an electrical outlet away.

    Rich

  11. #111
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,832

    Default

    That's probably good advice but my failing the @#$% test puts me below average intelligence I guess. I have no desire to yak on the radio. I couldn't hear the other end anyway. It's a portable Yaesu and it's here for emergencies only. So, yeah, it is about pushing the button and talking. I don't need to make perfect, just contact.

  12. #112
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,832

    Default

    That's probably good advice but my failing the @#$% test puts me below average intelligence I guess. I have no desire to yak on the radio. I couldn't hear the other end anyway.  It's a portable Yaesu and it's here for emergencies only. So, yeah, it is about pushing the button and talking. I don't need to make perfect, just contact or listen in to what's going on (which someone else will have to do anyway).

  13. #113

    Default

    Hello guys, As you can see this is my first post. Ham radio is communication that can't be beat. I got my license back in 72 and it is much easier now. Back then you did not know the questions on the test and now you study from a book that has the questions or test at the back of the book. This is a sample of several questions that may be asked. You just don't know which question might be asked. Also one was required to learn the code. I have the advanced license, talked all over the world, navy ships, run what is called phone batch traffic for people overseas. Have even talked to the space shuttle.

    Having an antenna is a simple thing to do in an emergency. I always used a dipole antenna. It is just two pieces of wire cut to a particular length (depending on frequency, longer length for lower frequencies, shorter for higher). On the coax the shield goes to one side, center conductor to another.

    Trying to place a story in my mind that was several years ago. Some army group over seas had attracted and some students at the school had hid a ham radio and were calling for help. So you can't beat it.

    The, what is called 2 meter 147 mhz, is what we have a lot of repeaters on. It is line of sight communications which means basically, you see me, you can talk to me. Also repeaters are put in orbit called oscar. We actually communicate with them and, once again, line of sight which has me talking all over the place on very low power.

  14. #114
    One step at a time intothenew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    1,139

    Default Gmrs+ ?

    I started with FRS quite a few years ago for hunting. Migrated to GMRS because of the wattage increase, and yes I do have a license. The individual license allows anyone in my immediate family to operate on it. I have two 5 watt quasi bases, and a multitude of 2 watt handhelds. Non of those accept an external antennae.


    If I understand the license correctly, I can go up to 50 watts and have an external antennae staying within a few guidelines on height. I have been researching on taking full advantage of the license, but am a bit timid of what I am finding.


    First, the wish list.

    50 watts GMRS (existing license)

    .5 watt FRS ( no license required )

    2 watts MURS ( no license required )

    HAM ( Rx only for the moment, license to follow if deemed necessary )

    Weather

    External antennae

    One radio ( x 5 for all member locales )

    Legal


    Mobile or base would be acceptable, but mobile would be preferred. 12 volt power and the ability to carry to ridge top for better reception being biggies. Roughly an 8 mile range will be required worst case.


    That may in fact be an impossible goal. Dual band (VHF/UHF), programmable power output, FCC "type accepted", and two separate "tuned antennae"? Can anybody help me wade through this, or let me in the boat? The information is overflowing my hip waders, and I don't figure chest waders are going to help either.
    "They call us civilized because we are easy to sneak up on."- Lone Waite

  15. #115
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,046

    Default

    Since I keep my BOB in my truck at all times, and it could get stolen, I do not keep expensive items in it. I have a 40 channel hand held CB radio that is fairly light weight, and has a telescoping antenna about 3 feet long. I bought it from Fleabay for 20 dollars about 8 years ago, and it is like new since I have never used it except to make sure it works. So I stretched a plastic bag over it, and it slips right into a side pocket on my BOB. I keep 8 extra batteries for it, and if it gets stolen out of the truck, I aint lost much.
    It is a full 4 watt output, and I have talked to truckers 6-8 miles away and much farther when the skip ws right. There is no guarantee it will work out in the wilderness, but I feel better with it than I would a 2 watt FRS unit!

  16. #116
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,046

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildthang View Post
    Since I keep my BOB in my truck at all times, and it could get stolen, I do not keep expensive items in it. I have a 40 channel hand held CB radio that is fairly light weight, and has a telescoping antenna about 3 feet long. I bought it from Fleabay for 20 dollars about 8 years ago, and it is like new since I have never used it except to make sure it works. So I stretched a plastic bag over it, and it slips right into a side pocket on my BOB. I keep 8 extra batteries for it, and if it gets stolen out of the truck, I aint lost much.
    It is a full 4 watt output, and I have talked to truckers 6-8 miles away and much farther when the skip ws right. There is no guarantee it will work out in the wilderness, but I feel better with it than I would a 2 watt FRS unit!
    Plus I just love saying, how about you Rubber Duck:scared

  17. #117
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    16,785

    Default

    Had a had a pair of held 40 channel Cobra units......then one went belly up...so i do carry the last one but leave out the batteries as it uses 16 AA's.

    After my quest with the walkie talkies, I thinking maybe I need to look into the ham more......
    Survival isn't a game...it's what you do when the game goes sideways.

  18. #118
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,046

    Default

    Yeah those Yeasu's are a portable ham as such, but I think they are around $300 to 400 bucks, and too expensive to just leave in the truck all the time. I will probably get one someday, but for now, the old 40 channel CB will do! If I thought I was going to be 30 or 40 miles from any highway, town, or anything, I would get a Yeasu because the range is phenominal on those things!

  19. #119
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,832

    Default

    I have a Midland 75-822 Portable and the Yaesu VX-6. I carry the Yaesu just about everywhere in the woods. It's completely submersible including the mike to 3 feet for 30 minutes. So I don't have to worry about it getting wet in a rainstorm. $250ish if I remember right. The price might be posted in the thread someplace. I don't remember. It also has five weather service bands so you get weather reports no matter where you are. As well as a barometric chip that displays the pressure.

  20. #120
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Keweenaw Peninsula of upper Michigan, about the middle of the south shore of Lake Superior
    Posts
    300

    Default

    I have a set of frs ( 2) licensed COBRA radios and my license expires 6/20/12. I am not renewing my license and will be getting rid of them AFTER the license expires. If some on wants them, they can have them for paying the shipping. I have only used them on one hunt in canada just after they were licensed.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •