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Thread: Pine tree question

  1. #21
    Ed edr730's Avatar
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    I dry the white pine needles...or sometimes red and then just run em through the coffee grinder. Makes it easy to use. If you want white pine bark just get it from someone who cut one down. I just cut one on a property I have because the needles destroy roof shingles pretty darn fast. It's good clear wood that makes good trim or 2 bys. Almost a shame to use it on 2 bys.


  2. #22
    Senior Member flandersander's Avatar
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    What about jack pine? Is the inner bark/needles edible?

  3. #23
    Member EarthRocks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pocomoonskyeyes View Post
    As far as I know all pines(pinus spp.) are edible as far as inner bark and needles, oh and nuts.


    This is exactly what i was looking for. And it was posted 2 years ago. Sweet.

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  5. #25
    Member EarthRocks's Avatar
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    Oh yes. i ve been stalking this one outside of my house for weeks and its getting colder and colder out. haha. Na, ive just got tons of differnt pines trees around my area and want to make sure I wont get sick for making a tea out of the needles of ANY pine tree. But this is only something I want to try for medicinal use against colds and flus as someone has posted in here it is a great fighter against.

  6. #26
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'm not certain where you are located but white pine (Pinus strobus) is pretty plentiful through out the Midwest. It's easy to find, too, since it's needles are always in a cluster of five. I've tried Blue Spruce as well but it isn't worth the effort for me. The dang needles are as sharp as...well...needles. But the tea is good if not a bit more piney tasting.

  7. #27
    Member EarthRocks's Avatar
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    Yea Im in the colorado and see a selection. but the one Ive hand my eye on is definately the sharp as needle pine. Thanks i will be looking for the white pine. I also found some wild rose or Rose hip around my girl friends house I want to add to the tea. thanks for the advice again.

  8. #28
    Junior Member wildgarden's Avatar
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    Has anyone actually harvested the pine inner bark? The outer bark seems really tough to penetrate so I am assuming one would take an ax to it? Any specifics on harvesting?

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  10. #30
    Junior Member newzealandsurvival's Avatar
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    I have consumed Pine and Douglas fur needles/buds, willow and poplar cambium isnt to bad, the best thing we have over here is Manuka and Kanuka, it is a flowering tree that is most commonly used for honey, the honey has antibacterial properties that are as strong as some pharmecutical antibiotics, top grade Manuka honey sells for around $50 for a small jar. the Manuka leaves make great tea.

    manuka-tree.jpg

  11. #31

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    In certain seasons, conifer trees have bright green "growing tips" at the ends of their branches. I see this in my area with redwoods, Douglas fir and mountain hemlock (not water hemlock, hehe!). These are among the tastiest things and are probably loaded with vitamins!

  12. #32

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    yes, they all work the same. you can also make glue from the sap!

  13. #33
    Senior Member snakeman's Avatar
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    all pine tree needles are edible. there are mostly shortleaf and virginia pines where i live, which have thicker needles than white pine (which i've never tried) but i'm assuming they all taste very similar. keep in mind though that pine needle tea has been known to cause miscarriages and other pregnancy problems, so don't drink it if that applies to you
    Pickin' n' Grinnin'

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