Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33

Thread: Pine tree question

  1. #1
    Senior Member 2dumb2kwit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northeastern NC
    Posts
    8,503

    Default Pine tree question

    In the pictures and video's that I've seen, of people making pine needle tea, out getting the inner bark of pine trees, the pine's are short needle pines.
    We don't have those around here. We have long needle pines. Are these the same, as far a making tea, or eating the inner bark?
    Writer of wrongs.
    Honey, just cuz I talk slow doesn't mean I'm stupid. (Jake- Sweet Home Alabama)
    "Stop Global Whining"


  2. #2
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    42,939
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I don't know about the inner bark, but the needles will make tea. Just chop em up or break em up in your hand - maybe half a cup and add boiling water. Continue to gently boil for 10 to 15 minutes.
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  3. #3

    Default

    As far as I know all pines(pinus spp.) are edible as far as inner bark and needles, oh and nuts.

  4. #4
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,035

    Default

    I've had both white pine tea and blue spruce tea. Both are very good but blue spruce is almost a self sacrifice because the needles are so sharp. White pine has a very clean taste. It leaves your mouth feeling very clean. White pine is pretty easy to spot. The needles are in clusters of 5. Everywhere the needles sprout there will be 5 of them. Some chop the needles, I don't. I just add them to boiling water and let them steep for about 10 minutes. Add sugar or honey or whatever you like. White pine is my favorite.

    I'm not sure what you are referring to for short needle. Tamarack is one. No on the tea but you can make flour from it. Balsam Fir, no on the tea, yes on flour. Eastern Hemlock is another, yes to tea and flour. Eastern Hemlock is a tree and not the poisonous hemlock plant.

    Just make certain you don't misidentify an American Yew with Balsam Fir. American Yew is poisonous.

  5. #5

    Default

    Are all pine trees ok to make tea from? I have a huge one by my front door and want to try the tea this winter. The pine cones are tiny, but the tree is over 2 stories tall.


    Sorry, I missed that earlier post. It is getting late!
    Last edited by earth2res; 07-28-2009 at 12:22 AM.

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Chugach National Forest
    Posts
    9,795
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by earth2res View Post
    Are all pine trees ok to make tea from?
    AVOID The ones that Rick, pee's on.

  7. #7
    Swamp Dweller Ravnari86's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Brevard County, FL
    Posts
    54

    Default

    The most common in FL are the longleaf pine. At least in my area. I use all the mentioned parts, and they are quite decent, readily available edibles. To be honest, here, GA, and TN I've yet to find a pine the inner bark wasn't edible on...
    ___________________________________________
    "Men give away nothing so liberally as their advice."
    -Fancois De La Rochefoucauld-

  8. #8
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,035

    Default

    Nothing wrong with adding a little flavor. Yellow pine is good.

  9. #9
    Senior Member 2dumb2kwit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northeastern NC
    Posts
    8,503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I'm not sure what you are referring to for short needle.
    The pines around here are Loblolly pine. Their needles are longer than most other pines.(I think.) LOL

    http://www.conifers.org/pi/pin/taeda.htm
    Writer of wrongs.
    Honey, just cuz I talk slow doesn't mean I'm stupid. (Jake- Sweet Home Alabama)
    "Stop Global Whining"

  10. #10
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,035

    Default

    Loblolly is still Pinus sp. so I can't see why it wouldn't be edible. White Pine is Pinus strobus and Loblolly is Pinus taeda. I would quickly add that I've never tried it.

  11. #11
    Swamp Dweller Ravnari86's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Brevard County, FL
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Never tried Loblolly, but it should be about the same. It seems to vary from sp. to sp. as to how much inside bark is there, but it's all been edible that I've run across so far.
    ___________________________________________
    "Men give away nothing so liberally as their advice."
    -Fancois De La Rochefoucauld-

  12. #12
    Senior Member 2dumb2kwit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northeastern NC
    Posts
    8,503

    Default

    Thanks for the info, y'all.
    If y'all keep learnin' me stuff, I may not be dumb my whole life! LOL
    Writer of wrongs.
    Honey, just cuz I talk slow doesn't mean I'm stupid. (Jake- Sweet Home Alabama)
    "Stop Global Whining"

  13. #13

    Default

    In the southeastern US the most common pines are mostly Slash, Loblolly and Longleaf. These are edible and utilitarian. On a side note for those who want to walk softly on the earth avoid using the Longleaf if possible. The Red Cockaded Woodpecker uses that species exclusively for nesting of a certain age/size.As the RCW is an enadangered species likewise the tree is also protected in most places. You can't miss the longleaf as it's cones are huge 6" or so and of course as the name implies the needles are much longer than other pinus spp. Loblolly and Slash on the other hand are FAST growers which is why these are the spp. most used by the Paper Companies. Generally in 20 years they are ready to harvest for pulp and phone poles two of their most common uses.
    Last edited by pocomoonskyeyes; 07-28-2009 at 03:46 PM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member 2dumb2kwit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northeastern NC
    Posts
    8,503

    Default

    uhhh...woodpecker.....red cockadded. This is a joke, right? LOL
    Writer of wrongs.
    Honey, just cuz I talk slow doesn't mean I'm stupid. (Jake- Sweet Home Alabama)
    "Stop Global Whining"

  15. #15
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,035

    Default

    Why are folks eating the inside barks of trees? I can understand doing that if you needed to but why muck up a tree just because? What am I missing?

  16. #16

    Default

    Nope , I was Serious. as a matter of fact loggers are required to not cut for I believe around 30 yds of any nesting site they find. Just a thought that we might want to pay attention to what we harvest as there aren't that many Longleafs, Slash and Loblolly pines on the other hand are oh so plentiful. at least in S. Ga. where I am from.

  17. #17
    Senior Member 2dumb2kwit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northeastern NC
    Posts
    8,503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pocomoonskyeyes View Post
    Nope , I was Serious. as a matter of fact loggers are required to not cut for I believe around 30 yds of any nesting site they find. Just a thought that we might want to pay attention to what we harvest as there aren't that many Longleafs, Slash and Loblolly pines on the other hand are oh so plentiful. at least in S. Ga. where I am from.
    I was just joking about the name.
    Writer of wrongs.
    Honey, just cuz I talk slow doesn't mean I'm stupid. (Jake- Sweet Home Alabama)
    "Stop Global Whining"

  18. #18
    Senior Member 2dumb2kwit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northeastern NC
    Posts
    8,503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Why are folks eating the inside barks of trees? I can understand doing that if you needed to but why muck up a tree just because? What am I missing?
    I wouldn't mess up a tree for it, but if I happen to see a recently fallen pine, I could really surprise a couple of my friends with this knowledge.

    (...and there is that just in case you need it thing. LOL)
    Writer of wrongs.
    Honey, just cuz I talk slow doesn't mean I'm stupid. (Jake- Sweet Home Alabama)
    "Stop Global Whining"

  19. #19

    Default

    another thing to keep in mind about pine trees - it's uses - Apiece of "fat lighter"(stump wood usually that the sap has dried and hardened in it) this makes an excellent fire starter as the pitch burns really well, use a big enough piece as a torch and at night you can "jack" fish at night.Fish become blinded by the light and moving slowly, move your hand under the fishes belly, and with a quick grab - voila' you have fish for dinner. Please note this is illegal in most places, and should be used only in a true survival situation. The pitch also makes an excellent natural glue especially for fletching arrows. All in all a really good plant to know as there are many spp. and all have similar uses. Oh and don't forget pine nuts, The seed from the pine cone. it is edible and can be gathered without harming the tree.

  20. #20
    Senior Member 2dumb2kwit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northeastern NC
    Posts
    8,503

    Default

    I think the things that you mentioned, are part of the reason I had to ask.

    Let's see...you can burn it, you can stick stuff together with it, you can eat it....
    WHAT? LOL
    Writer of wrongs.
    Honey, just cuz I talk slow doesn't mean I'm stupid. (Jake- Sweet Home Alabama)
    "Stop Global Whining"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •