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Thread: Get back home bag?

  1. #1

    Default Get back home bag?

    So I have been thinking about SHTF scenarios and I have decided that I need to prepare for an incident if I were away from home, most likely at work. I work 40 miles away from my home. My route home includes metropolis, suburb, and rural. I figure if I had to walk all the way from work I would wait till the morning and begin walking. I would hope I would be able to spend the next night in my own bed but if not I have some spots selected.


    So I am looking at making a bag that I could put in car and attempt to drive home. I want to be prepared if I need to ditch my car. So I figure a backpack (nothing surplus, don't want to worry the sheeple) Is the way to go. I already have a small nalgene bottle kit with the following contents:
    32oz nalgene bottle.
    gerber clutch pocket multitool
    poncho
    emergency blanket
    whistle/compass/thermometer combo
    keychain led light
    pocket folding saw
    iodine tabs
    small bic lighter
    matches
    break light stick
    duck tape rolled onto itself
    small fishing kit (hooks, spilt shot, 30' of line wrapped around a pen)
    snare wire
    bottle of hand sanitizer
    folder knife
    small first aid kit (steristrips, bandaids, moleskin.)
    some hobby knife blades in a plastic container
    belt hoder for the bottle.

    Now that is all in the bottle in my car.
    I have a few items I think I should add to it in my backpack.
    tarps
    change of clothes (uniform not a good idea)
    some sort of firearm (my trunk gun or a ccw when I get it)
    extra socks
    hat
    some money (50 bucks no bigger than fives)
    compass
    map of both counties
    better first aid kit
    paracord
    extra water bottle
    gloves
    concealment paint if I need to move at night
    emergency radio
    fishing kit
    any suggestions would be greatly appreciated
    "A hero never lives forever, but a coward never lives"
    EMT Instructor


  2. #2
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I think you're spot on. I have a nylon laptop tote that I've converted to a get home bag. I figure no one will be the wiser with me carrying it. Inside much of the same you named.
    An extra 4.5 inch blade
    dust mask
    first aid
    water purification
    Esbit stove and fuel
    food and drink mixes
    Leather gloves
    paracord
    small home made survival kit
    my handgun is always on me
    Other things you mentioned

  3. #3
    Senior Member Smok's Avatar
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    Good Boots for you and any one that might be with you . You may not have good boots on when it does happen
    Do it with what you got and you want need what you don't have

  4. #4
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    With just a quick look through you list I come up with a few things that you are short on. First is water, you need some way to carry and to start out with some. You also need some way to procure some on you walk home, like some kind of filter. There are a couple of differnt brands out there to choose from. To walk 40 miles you should also have some kind of food. Energy bars, MREs, or food packets that you put together yourself will work. One last point, I think 40 miles in one day is a stretch when there are no problems about. But if it is after somekind of SHTF then you better figure on about 3 days, maybe more. Good luck with putting it all together.

  5. #5
    Resident Numpty mountain mama's Avatar
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    You forgot the kitchen sink!!!!

    Actually, that is on MY list. Your's looks a lot like my BOB, but here are a few things I have on mine that you may or may not want on your list:

    rollup sunglasses
    bear spray
    candle
    steel wool
    cotton balls saturated with petroleum jelly in film canister
    zip lock baggies
    toilet paper
    bandana
    boullion cubes
    heavy duty trash bags
    whet stone
    mess tin
    char cloth
    glue stick
    fresnel lens
    Last edited by mountain mama; 05-08-2009 at 09:55 AM. Reason: accidentally hit enter before I was actually done

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by wade View Post
    With just a quick look through you list I come up with a few things that you are short on. First is water, you need some way to carry and to start out with some. You also need some way to procure some on you walk home, like some kind of filter. There are a couple of differnt brands out there to choose from. To walk 40 miles you should also have some kind of food. Energy bars, MREs, or food packets that you put together yourself will work. One last point, I think 40 miles in one day is a stretch when there are no problems about. But if it is after somekind of SHTF then you better figure on about 3 days, maybe more. Good luck with putting it all together.
    I know MREs speed up expiration when stored in a hot place. What kind of food can I store in my car? I was thinking canned food like dinty moore, veggies, spaghettios. I keep a case of water in my car at all times.
    I really don't need the bear spray, not in our area. I will throw in some TP, candles, sunscreen, bug spray, a water filter is on my list of stuff but right now I have to go with iodine tabs or a clear bottle using the sun's UV light.
    "A hero never lives forever, but a coward never lives"
    EMT Instructor

  7. #7
    Resident Numpty mountain mama's Avatar
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    If you are going to carry canned food in your vehicle, don't forget the can opener.

    Bear spray works on humans too.

    My best friend has liver disease, so she opted for a small vial of bleach as opposed to the iodine tabs. I wouldn't trust a clear bottle and the sun's UV. Better to boil.

  8. #8
    Senior Member bulrush's Avatar
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    I hope you don't mind if I comment on some of your choices, as I have experience with some of these.

    - keychain led light: I have one of these, the Photon Microlight. Actually I have several different models by various companies. Unless it's a 1 watt luxeon type it's useless in pitch dark. They don't throw light very far. So I just got a $25 1 watt luxeon type 3AAA flashlight, very bright, don't shine it in anyone's eyes, they will be blinded.

    - pocket folding saw: if this is one of those wire saws, I haven't found one that works yet.

    - break light stick: useless except for a marker light. Might attract fish at night.

    - snare wire: do you actually have experience using this? There's a lot more to it than just building the snare. Do you know WHERE to build the snare? Do you know HOW to bait it?

    - bottle of hand sanitizer: another good choice. You don't need water to wash up.

    - some hobby knife blades in a plastic container: very good choice. Razor sharp blades are good for gutting small animals for food.

    Good choices up there, but some things did not work well for me when I actually tried them, like the LED light.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by bulrush View Post
    I hope you don't mind if I comment on some of your choices, as I have experience with some of these.

    - keychain led light: I have one of these, the Photon Microlight. Actually I have several different models by various companies. Unless it's a 1 watt luxeon type it's useless in pitch dark. They don't throw light very far. So I just got a $25 1 watt luxeon type 3AAA flashlight, very bright, don't shine it in anyone's eyes, they will be blinded.

    - pocket folding saw: if this is one of those wire saws, I haven't found one that works yet.

    - break light stick: useless except for a marker light. Might attract fish at night.

    - snare wire: do you actually have experience using this? There's a lot more to it than just building the snare. Do you know WHERE to build the snare? Do you know HOW to bait it?

    - bottle of hand sanitizer: another good choice. You don't need water to wash up.

    - some hobby knife blades in a plastic container: very good choice. Razor sharp blades are good for gutting small animals for food.

    Good choices up there, but some things did not work well for me when I actually tried them, like the LED light.

    I always want to here ANY advice. I agree on the led light, it is small and has certain uses. I like the fact that its the size of a quarter and is cheap. If I was coming home from work I would also have a sureifre G2led.
    The break light can be used to signal somebody, I put it in the bottle for when I hunt. If I fall and break a leg sort of situation. The pocket folding saw is a fold open not a wiresaw. Still learning the snare wire.
    "A hero never lives forever, but a coward never lives"
    EMT Instructor

  10. #10
    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    thats what i carry in car is a "man" bag of necessities to ensure my chances of getting back to my home.
    God lives in the Mountain, Serve the Master, The Mountain also serves the Master. Serve the Mountain,
    The Mountain Breaks you.
    http://www.youtube.com/trapperjacksurvival
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  11. #11
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    One point that I thought I'd make on any of these. We need to remember that unsecured objects inside a vehicle can make dandy missiles and head knockers in the event of a wreck. Anything loose becomes a battering ram in a roll over. Just make sure you secure your gear properly or store it where there is no chance it can come loose in a sudden stop or roll over.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    One point that I thought I'd make on any of these. We need to remember that unsecured objects inside a vehicle can make dandy missiles and head knockers in the event of a wreck. Anything loose becomes a battering ram in a roll over. Just make sure you secure your gear properly or store it where there is no chance it can come loose in a sudden stop or roll over.

    Also make sure it is in a trunk or under some kind of cover so that it does not present a tempting target for thieves-of-opportunity.



    I also thought (since the OP stated that he won't want anything mil-surp or to wear his uniform as that might insense the "sheeple") that you may want to avoid camoflauge colors completely. Where I live/work almost everyone has tons of camo stuff so; it's not an issue. But, if I was in a metro area, a camo hunting-type bag might draw too much unwanted attention.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Stairman's Avatar
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    Slow day. Heres my BOB contents. Keep in mind these are small possibles type bags, camo of course, inside a main pack. I also use this pack for primitive camping and overnight kayaking....3 lb small dome tent, self inflator sleeping pad, 30 degree bag and 50 degree bag,both the size of a loaf of bread and can be combined, folding saw, 7inch Kabar sheath knife, folding shovel, has hollow handle packed with cotton, garbage bags[2], net hammock in a beanie, pocket cooker[wood burning] Snowpeak stove and Trangia alky burner/ring, fuel for both, fishin kit, ink pen wrapped with fishin line,compact coleman cookset, snare wire[alot],ducttape wrapped around a clothspin, safety pins[8] LED visor light, LED flashlight wrapped with orange flag tape, whistle/compass/mag glass combo, primary compass, GPS, 4 AA batteries, 2 tealight candles, firesteel, magnesium striker, pencil sharpener[for tinder makin] 550 cord, spork, salt, sig mirror, folding knife, multitool, bic lighters in baggie, visene bottle of cooking oil, index cards[some blank, some with trap/snare ideas etc, Imodium, Goody powders,bandaids, neosporin, pepto tabs, big gauze pad, chapstick, hand sanditizer, [2] motel soap bars, towel, nailclippers, needles[2] scalpel blade, dental floss[for thread mainly] space blanket[unopened] toothbrush/paste[small folding for travel] small idiot knife sharpener, 10 vitamins, tweezers, folding plastic cutting board, 5x5 sheet of tyvec[ground cloth] bright orange poncho, 5 gallon collapsable water container[shower] foil[folded small] pruners, In a pillow case I have fleece shirt, fleece hood,orange vest, thinsulate bottoms and top, cotton tee shirt,[2] bandanas, gloves, headnet, flannel boxers,wool socks, small fry pan, dip and sip water purifier bottle, extra water bottle, sponge. Food pack has cocoa, koolaid, Ramen, Cliff bars, trail mix, fig newtons, tuna tins,chicken tins, jerky,powdered milk,instant breakfast, a couple mainstay entrees ,peanut butter, bannock mix, powdered eggs, dried fruit ect. This is a separate pack from the main items and are rotated and eaten throughout the year. Also some seasonal items are swapped out in the summer months for thermocells ect.,

  14. #14
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucznik
    anything mil-surp or to wear his uniform as that might insense the "sheeple"
    Being a sheeple I didn't want to scare myself. That's why I went with a computer bag in black ballistic nylon. It looks like a brief case and I can just throw it over my shoulder.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    If you want to avoid mil surplus because of the "look", the face camo might be a bit much.....I'm just saying.
    Can't Means Won't

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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    If you want to avoid mil surplus because of the "look", the face camo might be a bit much.....I'm just saying.
    this is true.
    "A hero never lives forever, but a coward never lives"
    EMT Instructor

  17. #17
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    MM - I was intrigued with your post up yonder about roll up sunglasses. I must confess I had never heard of them. Did some looking around and they are pretty spiffy. Here's what Doug Ritter says about them.

    "The roll-up sun glasses work surprisingly well. Designed originally for post-mydriatic temporary eye protection when you leave the eye doctor, they are more than adequate for survival use protecting vision in bright environments without taking up much room or weighing hardly anything. They stayed on even under difficult conditions and there's really nothing to break."

    Pretty cool product. Thanks!!!!!!

  18. #18

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    Unless you really know your way across country I'd definitely suggest some type of topo map and learning how to orient with a compass (you didn't say what uniform, you may already know how).
    You may have to avoid major roads in SHTF.

  19. #19
    Cold Heartless Breed tsitenha's Avatar
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    8"- 10" flat pry bar might be worth a try, small set of binoculars
    Bear Clan

    I was born with nothing,
    with hard work and deligence I still have most of it
    this week a lot less...must be a hole in my pocket

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by LowKey View Post
    Unless you really know your way across country I'd definitely suggest some type of topo map and learning how to orient with a compass (you didn't say what uniform, you may already know how).
    You may have to avoid major roads in SHTF.
    I am an EMT so I do know the roads pretty good in our area. I would try and drive as far as I could using the surface streets and back roads. after that I do have a road map and I will add a compass. The way home has a lot of visable landmarks so I could just sort of get home that way. Binoculars and a pry bar are a great idea.
    "A hero never lives forever, but a coward never lives"
    EMT Instructor

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