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Thread: Desert survival: Eat Bark Scorpions?

  1. #1

    Default Desert survival: Eat Bark Scorpions?

    Arizona is full of Bark Scorpions. Could they be harvested as survival food? I have read it is possible for other species of scorpion, but I was wondering if anyone knew specifically about the Bark Scorpions? If so, how: raw or cooked, etc. Thanks.

    Here is a great link on common Arizona scorpions:

    http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/insects/az1223/


  2. #2

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    Before you go catching and eating them keep this in mind.

    Common symptoms of a scorpion sting:
    pain, tingling or burning sensation at the sting site
    malaise, sweating, nausea and vomiting
    salivating
    numbness
    muscle twitching
    abnormal neck, eye and head movements/twitching
    heart palpitations
    breathing difficulties may occur

    More severe reactions include:
    blurring of consciousness
    unconsciousness
    convulsions
    fall in blood pressure
    shock
    the threat of death

    Insects to avoid include all adults that sting or bite, hairy or brightly colored insects, and caterpillars and insects that have a pungent odor. Also avoid spiders and common disease carriers such as ticks, flies, and mosquitoes.

    I lived in arizona, grew up there ( didnt come to texas till i was in my 30's) was a SAR member, and trust me scorpian stings hurt like hell, and will make you sick, first hand knowladge.
    I would catch chuckwalla's personaly. there non poisonis,and a lot more meat than a scorpian, and just about abundant too. or any lizard except gila monster.

    Being alone in a situation of survival is not the time to get stung by a scorpian.

    Just my 2 cents hope it helped.
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I have not eaten scorpions. Here is some information that I have found.

    From Scottsdale Scorpion Control:
    What are some predators of the Scorpion?
    Things that feed on Scorpions are other Scorpions, Tarantulas, Birds, Lizards, mice, and some small snakes. Human's can also eat scorpions, but it is advised that you remove the stinger and the bulb at the end of the tail. The bulb is where the venom is stored and the stinger could cause damage to the throat when swallowing. The imperial scorpion can be bought cooked and ready to eat every day in the streets of China. Doesn't that sound good?
    EAT SCOPIONS AT YOU OWN DISCRETION. WE ARE NOT ADVISING YOU TO DO SO.
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    Wolverine RunsWithDeer's Avatar
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    I used to live in Oklahoma and we had scorpions all over. The ones we had were very small, and tan in color. They would get in the house, but not too dangerous. I was stung a few times and it was painful, but only as bad as a bee sting. I would go around in the evening and catch them with a pair of meat thongs. A neighbor collected them and he ate them roasted over a fire. I could not bring myself to try it. The only prep he did was to remove the stinger.

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    Survival Instructor S.E.R.E Guy's Avatar
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    Be sure to remove the stinger but they are very much so edible, raw is not too bad but i prefer roasted over a fire

  6. #6

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    Bugs shouldn't be a source of food in the wild unless it is the last thing available. Many have poison and the nutritional value is nil.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by primeelite View Post
    Bugs shouldn't be a source of food in the wild unless it is the last thing available. Many have poison and the nutritional value is nil.
    Please site your source of this information. Everything I have learned (and eaten) is that pound for pound, insects provide the most protein you can find in the wild. Additionally, the majority of the populations of the world do include insects in their diet.

    EDIT: Scorpions are not insects, they are arachnids.
    Last edited by crashdive123; 01-10-2009 at 09:46 PM.
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    There is some good information on this forum about edible insects. Eurunkinsurvival has posted some pics of his roasted forest fare. You can find out a bit more at http://www.wilderness-survival.net/food-1.php

    Insects
    The most abundant life-form on earth, insects are easily caught. Insects provide 65 to 80 percent protein compared to 20 percent for beef. This fact makes insects an important, if not overly appetizing, food source. Insects to avoid include all adults that sting or bite, hairy or brightly colored insects, and caterpillars and insects that have a pungent odor. Also avoid spiders and common disease carriers such as ticks, flies, and mosquitoes.
    Rotting logs lying on the ground are excellent places to look for a variety of insects including ants, termites, beetles, and grubs, which are beetle larvae. Do not overlook insect nests on or in the ground. Grassy areas, such as fields, are good areas to search because the insects are easily seen. Stones, boards, or other materials lying on the ground provide the insects with good nesting sites. Check these sites. Insect larvae are also edible. Insects such as beetles and grasshoppers that have a hard outer shell will have parasites. Cook them before eating. Remove any wings and barbed legs also. You can eat most insects raw. The taste varies from one species to another. Wood grubs are bland, while some species of ants store honey in their bodies, giving them a sweet taste. You can grind a collection of insects into a paste. You can mix them with edible vegetation. You can cook them to improve their taste.
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  9. #9

    Wink Mother Nature's Insect Smorgagbord!

    Primeelite wrote: Bugs shouldn't be a source of food in the wild unless it is the last thing available. Many have poison and the nutritional value is nil.
    Much to the contrary Primeelite. Insects are a good source of protein. Things like:Ants, Scorpions (yes that includes Bark Scorpions), Maggots, grasshoppers, worms and others. With grasshoppers you need to pull the head off. Pulling the head off will also pull out the innards. Roast 'em up and Bon Appetite!

    It is best to cook them before eating, but, if need be, they can be eaten raw.
    Everything I have posted is pure fantasy. I have not done any of the things that I have claimed to have done in my posts. I actually live in Detroit.

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    Senior Member RBB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nativedude View Post
    Much to the contrary Primeelite. Insects are a good source of protein. Things like:Ants, Scorpions (yes that includes Bark Scorpions), Maggots, grasshoppers, worms and others. With grasshoppers you need to pull the head off. Pulling the head off will also pull out the innards. Roast 'em up and Bon Appetite!

    It is best to cook them before eating, but, if need be, they can be eaten raw.
    Why is it best to pull the head off grasshoppers? My brother is pretty big on bugs, and he eats every grasshopper he sees. Just chomps em down.
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  11. #11

    Default Edible Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by RBB View Post
    Why is it best to pull the head off grasshoppers? My brother is pretty big on bugs, and he eats every grasshopper he sees. Just chomps em down.
    Pulling the head off pulls out most of their stomach and guts. Grasshoppers can have parasites (tape worm?), so you don't want to eat that raw if possible. It is safer not to eat it.

    Thanks everyone for your feed back about scorpions. I'm not planning any snacks; I just wanted to be in the know.

    [I also read that they could be eaten raw (stinger & venom gland removed) ,soaked in wine...and they taste like shrimp! ???]

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    As far as pulling the head off grasshoppers - as was said, it removes their plumbing as well. Some types of grasshoppers feed on the rotting flesh of dead critters that can cause parasites (as Brackenfish said). That's another reason to roast em.
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    Senior Member Stairman's Avatar
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    I would boil or roast any insects eaten and agree they are nessesary survival fare.I wont be eating any spider or scorpions.

  14. #14

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    My source was just someone I hike with regularly. I guess they may be wrong about it but they were just saying bugs are no good most of the time because if you don't do things right such as many would not know to pull the heads off the grasshoppers then you could get a nasty case of diarrhea from it fairly quick. But like I said my source isn't a great one.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by primeelite View Post
    My source was just someone I hike with regularly. I guess they may be wrong about it ............... But like I said my source isn't a great one.
    This brings up a very important point. For anybody viewing these forums, asking questions, or taking the advice of others in general --- Make sure that they know what they are talking about! Your life may depend on it!
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  16. #16

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    RBB wrote: Why is it best to pull the head off grasshoppers? My brother is pretty big on bugs, and he eats every grasshopper he sees. Just chomps em down.
    Grasshoppers carry tapeworms. Pulling off the head and innards removes that threat. Tapeworms are not fun to have!
    Everything I have posted is pure fantasy. I have not done any of the things that I have claimed to have done in my posts. I actually live in Detroit.

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    I have had 3 bark scorpions inside this past week, the complex is sprayed regularly so they didnt appear real healthy, but they were alive, I just flushed them, (they sink like a stone?) , I would have to be mighty hungry to eat one (yes i know this is an old thread)

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    Uh, it's more than old.....

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  19. #19

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    I imagine that roasting them really good would be the best.... a slight burnt taste would help to cover up the nasty bit of taste.

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