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Thread: Winter Survival Kit

  1. #1
    Senior Member RBB's Avatar
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    Default Winter Survival Kit

    Every winter I put together a winter travel kit. By spring it is so much trash and I shovel it out of the car. I'm a bit late this year, but after the 40 mile trek to work tonight, 34 of it on back roads with the snow hitting the floor boards all the way, I can see it is time. I've been driving this route for 20 years and have only needed to use any of these items about three or four times, but was sure glad I had them those few times.

    There are houses along part of the route, but certain sections would require a long walk. Given the whiteout conditions tonight - you might be best off staying with the vehicle.

    What I usually carry:

    Snow shoes
    Winter mocs
    Two pairs wool socks
    Wool trousers
    Wool blanket shirt
    Canvas anorek
    Wool tuque
    Military extreme cold weather mitts
    Wool blankets
    Down sleeping bag
    Sheath knife
    Tinder box (w/flint & steel)
    Matches (in waterproof container)
    Sterno (w/ little stove)
    10 candy and energy bars
    Chewing gum
    Chewing tobacco
    Couple of paperbacks
    Bread rolls
    Tunafish (in dry pack)
    Hamburger (in dry pack)
    Quart canteen of water (needs to be taken in every trip)

    Any suggestions?
    Raised By Bears
    Bear Clan


  2. #2
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Default

    Looks like you've got the essentials covered. More importantly, you've used it, so you know it works for you.
    Can't Means Won't

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  3. #3
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    Default

    I am guessing you have other stuff that lives in the rig. But for the enlightenment of others I would have two shovels (they do break), set of "V" Bar ice chains, nylon tow strap, two 50# bags of sand, and maybe a come-a-long.

  4. #4
    Cold Heartless Breed tsitenha's Avatar
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    Default

    I have similar items, along with an ax, a swede saw, candle/lantern (to read the paperbacks with). Extra water....
    A tea pot to melt extra water (needed if you eat anything at all) and make tea/coffee, small pot to warm food in (a warm meal in your belly is nice)
    A CB/FRS/GMRS/radio or cell phone radio whatever works best in your coverage area.
    Bear Clan

    I was born with nothing,
    with hard work and deligence I still have most of it
    this week a lot less...must be a hole in my pocket

  5. #5

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    I can't really think of anything else you would need. That far out from anyone I don't know if signaling materials would do much good for you because no one would be out to see it. I guess if it really came down to needing a real big signaling if you got desperate you could just light the car you traveled in on fire haha.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Primeelite - You laugh about it, but there are some things on your vehicle that when lit make for excellent signaling. (Don't burn the vehicle, it's a pretty decent shelter) Spare tire (with 4 back-ups if needed) lit on fire produces a very heavy black smoke.
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  7. #7
    Retired Old Man
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    Default Prince Albert Heaters

    Quote Originally Posted by RBB View Post
    Every winter I put together a winter travel kit. By spring it is so much trash and I shovel it out of the car. I'm a bit late this year, but after the 40 mile trek to work tonight, 34 of it on back roads with the snow hitting the floor boards all the way, I can see it is time. I've been driving this route for 20 years and have only needed to use any of these items about three or four times, but was sure glad I had them those few times.

    There are houses along part of the route, but certain sections would require a long walk. Given the whiteout conditions tonight - you might be best off staying with the vehicle.


    Any suggestions?
    I've heard of cases where stranded motorists were able to use small alcohol heaters to keep vehicle interior warmed up in severe cold. This is if you elect to remain with the vehicle.

    The type I'm referring to is usually a pipe tobacco can (must have a metal lid that seals). Packed with old 100% cotton tee shirt. 91 % isopropyl will burn fine. No holes punched; just open lid and toss in a match.

    Of course, caution needs to be used burning inside a vehicle and windows need to be cracked. The folks I've talked to who have done this did not keep the can burning all night, but lit it for about 10 mins about every 1/2 hour just to keep the cabin above freezing. (The metal lid snuffs it right out.) They also cranked engine for heat, but conserved fuel by using the can between engine warm ups.

    I've used these in tents. They do stink, but won't overcome you (or kill you) as long as some fresh air is circulated. The yellow bottle of "Heet" or denatured probably burn cleaner than 91% iso.... I've yet to try it in this type stove. (The cheap 70% iso does not work well at all.)

    Also best to "pre-burn" this outdoors to burn off all the paint before using in any enclosed area.

    The hard part is finding a can with a good metal lid these days. (I bought some expensive cookies to acquire a proper can.)
    Last edited by ricm123; 01-04-2009 at 06:21 PM. Reason: syntax

  8. #8
    Senior Member Riverrat's Avatar
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    I have an old tobacco can (metal), put in a roll of TP with the center taken out, this has to be a snug fit, and use methyl hydrate to burn, clear, clean flame, can does not get hot, and cover puts if out. Have used this a coupe of times in the past. Works great.

  9. #9
    Bush Master MCBushbaby's Avatar
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    You could always get those oxygen candles used in the space station. They put off more oxygen than they burn and I think they have some kind of filter to deal with any smoke.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemica...#Oxygen_candle

    Don't know the heat output quality other than "smolders at 600F".
    Last edited by MCBushbaby; 01-04-2009 at 07:13 PM.
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  10. #10
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I've used chlorate candles before (military issue on submarines). I wouldn't recommend them for heating a vehicle in winter.
    Can't Means Won't

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  11. #11
    Loner Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    The Esbit Compact fold-up stove, using the Esbit fuel tabs, are safe to use in a vehicle, and work great. I've used them many times, even just to make a cup of coffee on the side of the road without getting out of the van.
    "A person is not finished when they are defeated.
    A person is finished when they quit."

  12. #12

    Post Winter Survival Kit

    A hand held short-wave two-way radio. They're great in an emergency situation!

    I have one in my cabin in AK. Rarely do I use it, but in an emergency, it's there. I have a solar charger to keep it charged. I charge it about every 3 months.

    I have talked to my buddy in Taiwan a couple of times.
    Everything I have posted is pure fantasy. I have not done any of the things that I have claimed to have done in my posts. I actually live in Detroit.

  13. #13

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    Yeah I guess that is right the tires would always make the best smoke since it would be a dark black. I guess if it came down to it in signaling a front light would do if you break it down right.

  14. #14
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    So will the horn if the battery isn't dead. Mirrors come of fairly easy too.
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