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Thread: Parang (Machete)

  1. #1
    Junior Member Greenleaf's Avatar
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    Default Parang (Machete)

    I was wondering what a good knife would be. I'm still pretty inexperienced by the way.

    Here's John "Lofty" Wiseman explaining his wonderful knife. Do you think it's a good one to invest in???

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMLI6BhFV2c&fmt=18

    Here's the actual weapon he had.

    http://www.survival-school.org/Defau...&ProductID=162

    What do you think? What do you prefer???


  2. #2
    Cold Heartless Breed tsitenha's Avatar
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    The parang, barong, kukri, machete, etc... can all fall under the label bush knives and do have value as long as you can use them safely. Experience is a harsh teacher sometimes.

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    Junior Member Greenleaf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsitenha View Post
    The parang, barong, kukri, machete, etc... can all fall under the label bush knives and do have value as long as you can use them safely. Experience is a harsh teacher sometimes.
    Hmm, which knives do you prefer to use? And why?

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Greenleaf - knives, parangs, machetes, axes are tools. I don't believe there is any magic "this is the best". It's going to depend on what you need the tool to be able to do. It's going to depend on climate. It's going to depend on skill level. It's going to depend on budget. The biggest factor is going to be if it works for you. We have a thread going (only 822 posts) that may give you some ideas. I haven't used the particular one you are asking about, so I can't give you any specifics on it.
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    Primitive Hunter Jericho117's Avatar
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    Iv'e heard of Parangs, suppost to be really effective for chopping down wood, but probablly a bit to heavy for skinning tasks or small duty's. Maybe for jungle terrian. Was going to buy the SOG Primitive Jungle knife, just like the Parang, but weaker, sad that SOG made a poor knife. Ka-bar knives make all-around good knives, survival or fighting. Im buying the leather handled one with non-serrations and seven inch blade.
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    whipper snapper hermitman's Avatar
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    I would say that it is a bad because like crashdive123 its a tool not a knife so as good as it might be for bushwacking and chopping but odds are you're going to be doing a lot more than that where your going to need something smaller
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    Senior Member SARKY's Avatar
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    Greenleaf, I personally do not subscribe to the one knife does it all theory. I carry big, medium and small knives in my kit. I also have a lot of experience with all of them. My big knife (which is not really that big) is an old BenchMade BushMaster. I has a slight arch to the spine of the knife and a belly forward design to the cutting edge. It chops way out of proportion to it's size. my medium knives are a ColdSteel Hunter and a military issue Swedish Mora, both very good and comfortable knives to use. My small knives (which are stashed everywhere in my kit) are a couple of Gerber LSTs, a Victorinox Hunter, and a ColdSteel MiniPendelton Hunter.
    When picking a large knife for your kit find a store that will allow you to fondle several knives and find one that feels good in your hand. What I mean by that is it balances well (doesn't feel unyeildy) and feels like an extension of your arm. You want to be one with the knife my young padoiun.

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    Bush Master MCBushbaby's Avatar
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    "Digging tool"? The LAST thing I would use my knife as would be a digging tool. I already don't trust this guy.
    And as Sarky says, multiple knives makes you more effective. I carry a Frosts Mora for finer work and then my Cold Steel SRK for the rough stuff. And an axe if I think I'll be needing something for the really tough stuff
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  9. #9
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    I have a parang and I have used many different knives in jungle such as kukris, machetes,
    dhals and e-neps but in jungle I believe it is best knife you can find. As I said in previous posting, you can even skin small game with it, though it is surely not the best knife for the job. Malaysians invented parang and they know alot about jungle survival, and just about everyone in Thailand who lives or works in jungle has some form of parang. However, I am talking about jungle, and my own experience here. Back in US I would prefer to carry a large bowie. It dpends or your own preference, what environment you are operating in and what you need the knife to do. I know wmany people with a great deal of experience in American wilderness who do not agree on which is best knife. Up to you.

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    Junior Member Greenleaf's Avatar
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    Hmm, ok. So this is what I'm seeing:

    (Correct me if I am wrong)
    -Knife needed depends on the environment.
    -Depends on the purpose of using the blade (Small or Heavy tasks).
    -No such thing as the perfect knife.
    -It's fine to carry multiple blades, but 1 preferably big one (about 14" blade) for heavy hacking if needed.
    -Get a knife that feels good in my hands. It should feel like attaching an extension to my arm.
    -Don't go on a spending spree. Buy what is necessary and affordable.


    Questions:

    -Does climate (like cold weather for example) effect the usage or effect of the blade? If so, why? How can you accommodate?
    -What brands or companies produce good knives that are affordable on a tight budget? What about a decent budget?

    Sorry for the awkward post, but I like to state what I learn so people can see my progress, and to also see if I made a mistake.
    Last edited by Greenleaf; 12-19-2008 at 08:13 AM.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenleaf View Post
    Hmm, ok. So this is what I'm seeing:

    (Correct me if I am wrong)
    -Knife needed depends on the environment.
    -Depends on the purpose of using the blade (Small or Heavy tasks).
    -No such thing as the perfect knife.
    -It's fine to carry multiple blades, but 1 preferably big one (about 14" blade) for heavy hacking if needed.
    -Get a knife that feels good in my hands. It should feel like attaching an extension to my arm.
    -Don't go on a spending spree. Buy what is necessary and affordable.


    Questions:

    -Does climate (like cold weather for example) effect the usage or effect of the blade? If so, why? How can you accommodate?
    -What brands or companies produce good knives that are affordable on a tight budget? What about a decent budget?

    Sorry for the awkward post, but I like to state what I learn so people can see my progress, and to also see if I made a mistake.
    Nothing awkward about your post at all. For climate, I had in mind wet vs dry, not cold vs warm. In a very wet climate you may want a blade made of stainless. There are advantages and disadvantages to different materials. With a blade made of carbon steel fire starting may be easier (generating a spark).

    There was a great write up a while back about choosing the knife that works best for you. Post #1 of this thread may help you out. (The others may too). http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...ead.php?t=1430
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    Bush Master MCBushbaby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenleaf View Post
    -Does climate (like cold weather for example) effect the usage or effect of the blade? If so, why? How can you accommodate?
    -What brands or companies produce good knives that are affordable on a tight budget? What about a decent budget?
    Well in extreme cold a knife blade becomes fragile, as does all steel, so don't go try bending your Mora 90 degrees. Speaking of Moras, for $22 (they upped the price?!) you can get the Frosts Mora 4.25" birch-handle, laminated carbon knife. It's one of the best because it'll beat most sub-$100 knives in plain bushwork and it's price bests more expensive steels in that, if it breaks or bends beyond repair, you can toss it.
    http://www.swedishknives.com/760craf...20Mora%20Knife
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    Senior Member Pict's Avatar
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    In Brazil I use a machete all the time. My area isn't the typical rain forest that most associate with Brazil. We have dense lowland hardwood forest, scrub, Savannah, and tropical alpine areas all within walking distance of each other.

    This is how I set up my machetes for the bush...

    Machete Modifications for the Bush

    I saw many similar ideas in the way he uses his blade. I always back up my machete with a scandi knife of some type either a Skookum Bush tool or a Mora Triflex Craftsman typically.

    I use my machete to dig all the time and have fount it does no damage to any portion of the blade used for cutting. As Lofty W. pointed out, the base of the blade stays razor sharp. On my machetes the tip is pretty blunt and this is the only part affected by digging. The type of digging I do is mostly to level places to sleep, but also to dig out seeps for water. The thing you don't want to do is use the machete to pry.

    Someone is bound to suggest the digging stick. In the hardwood forests I don't sleep on the ground and water is abundant, I have sticks but don't need to dig. In the scrub, savannah, and mountains, there are no sticks or poor quality ones and I have to dig all the time. Mac

    Greenleaf, My official blades for my wilderness course are the 16 inch Tramontina machete ($6) and the Frost Mora Swedish Army Knife in stainless ($10). I need to buy new knives this year and will be replacing them with the 780 Triflex Craftsman in carbon steel. These have a slightly thicker blade and I find carbon steel easier to sharpen well (matter of time no quality). I have never had a complaint but many requests to buy the knives after the course.
    Last edited by Pict; 12-19-2008 at 01:25 PM.
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    Senior Member chiye tanka's Avatar
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    If you're thinking kukri, check out the jungle kukri thread. Crash modified his and did an awsome job of it.
    When I'm out and about, I always have 3 to 5 knives on me, along with an axe or big bush knife. This is gonna be a lot of trial and error for you, but also a learning experince.
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    For a "kukri" profile in a machete-width blade (thin) the Cold Steel version has served me quite well for the last couple of years.

    The blade steel is 1055 carbon and pretty darned tough.

    www.knifetests.com put one through its paces and I was quite impressed that it did so well for a $20 product.

    Cons?

    The blade profile is pretty poorly ground from the factory (quite dull) but nothing that 10 minutes and a Lansky (or similar) cannot fix.

    The checkered hard plastic grips are "cheese graters" and painful for extended chopping if not wearing gloves. Again, an easy fix. Wrap the grip in duct tape or take a small butane torch to "soften" and reduce the deep checkering surface.

    The factory supplied sheath/scabbard is horrible at best. The stitching/riveting is very shabby.

    While I would love a custom kydex sheath, I'm too cheap to buy a $40 sheath for a $18 knife!

    Still, for under $20 you have the advantage of of sharp tip, a wide belly, and the area closest to the tang where you can really perform bushcraft and delicate skinning chores (again, if properly sharpended).
    Last edited by Leighman; 12-26-2008 at 05:31 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenleaf View Post
    Sorry for the awkward post, but I like to state what I learn so people can see my progress, and to also see if I made a mistake.
    There's nothing "awkward" about knowledge; I'm "new" to this forum myself.

    That said, I have plenty of years spent in the boonies (usually, by choice thank goodness) and have YET to find the perfect "blade" for every outdoor task and yes, I have reciepts to prove it!

    Look at the field requirements of your own geographic enviroment, your skill level, and what feels good in your hands. Anything extra is just gravy.

    As Pict skillfully pointed out, you can rarely go wrong with Tramontina machetes and Frost/Mora knives. These are both examples of getting much, much more quality than what you paid for (providing you do your part).

    Good luck in your quest!

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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