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Thread: Pop quiz

  1. #181
    Coming through klkak's Avatar
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    Winter moose nuggets make a nice little fire.
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  2. #182
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nell67 View Post
    About $4.99 a 40 lb bag,but we aren't getting any in right now,supply is depleted and they don't know when they will be getting them,people are buying the pellet horse bedding to burn in their stoves right nw,don't know how well that is working out for them.
    see i don't get why use pellets instead of wood at 5 dollars a bag thats 35 dollars a week 140 a month at a bag a day i can buy two cords of hard wood for that and how many bags a day do you use? we use ours for rabbit bedding
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  3. #183
    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wareagle69 View Post
    see i don't get why use pellets instead of wood at 5 dollars a bag thats 35 dollars a week 140 a month at a bag a day i can buy two cords of hard wood for that and how many bags a day do you use? we use ours for rabbit bedding
    I don't have the stove,so i don't use them,but I do see alot of people where I work who come in looking for the pellets,and probably answer 30 calls a shift from these people,it's sad really because many of them are using that as their only form of heat and now they are too late to try to find the pellets,the company we get ours from at work can not tell us when we will get more in.
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    There you are out hunting meat for the pot. You come across some very fresh black bear tracks. The front paw prints are 4 inches wide.

    You notice that this bear never steps on a twig or rock and it is putting it's back paws into the tracks left by the front paws.

    The tracks indicate the bear is pigeon toed (feet pointing in word).

    The bear stays under cover but does not push through heavy brush.

    Is this bear worth hunting for meat?
    Explain why.
    Last edited by klkak; 12-02-2008 at 03:46 AM.
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  5. #185
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    naw it's just a cub
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    It's not a cub.
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    Quote Originally Posted by klkak View Post
    There you are out hunting meat for the pot. You come across some very fresh black bear tracks. The front paw print is 4 inches wide. You notice that this bear never steps on a twig or rock and it is putting it's back paw into the track left by the front paw.

    Is this bear worth hunting for meat?
    Explain why.
    It is not worth tracking down as it is smarter than me in the woods, and I will be the one hunted.
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  8. #188
    Super Moderater RangerXanatos's Avatar
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    Methinks that it's already stalking some prey. I think it would be worth it. The bear may have already caught it's prey and is lazily munching down on it's meal. Not going to even know that you've snuck up on it and taken sight of it as a meal for yourself. Bang. Got the bear and whatever it was eating.
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    Klkak - not ignoring this one - just don't know (got winded guessing on the last one). What RX says kind of makes sense. I'll wait and watch.
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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wareagle69 View Post
    always makes ya wonder whats out there looking at ya, we have allot more cougar sightings up here, black bears i am not concerned about but being stalked by a grizz thats really got to get in your head, bet ya didn't feel like top o the food chain there maybe top o the supper list
    I was stalked by a Jagurundi (Florida Bobcat) for three days in Pine Lakes, I was camping on portages between some shallow lakes. They are sly, and quiet, they are also large enough to be a threat. I was'nt attacked by that one but i think it wanted to.
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    RangerX, that is a good answer.

    Allow me to give some background.

    When I was 16, I was out hunting for meat. I came across these bear tracks. Not knowing much about bears at the time I followed them slowly. I found the bear in a blackberry patch. What I found was not what I expected.

    The size of the track isn't always a good indicator of whether a bear is worth hunting (for meat). Where it puts its foot down is important as is the path it takes through the woods.

    *The bear in this scenario is pigeon toed. The bear stays under cover but does not push through heavy brush.*
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  12. #192
    Super Moderater RangerXanatos's Avatar
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    So this bear could possibly have a hurt foot. This means to me that either you can catch up with it quickly and be eating for a while, or that it could be in a very bad mood for any company that it might encounter...
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  13. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by erunkiswldrnssurvival View Post
    I was stalked by a Jagurundi (Florida Bobcat) for three days in Pine Lakes, I was camping on portages between some shallow lakes. They are sly, and quiet, they are also large enough to be a threat. I was'nt attacked by that one but i think it wanted to.
    The jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi) is a medium-sized Mexican, Central and South American wild cat: average length 65 cm (30 inches) with 45 cm (20 in) of tail and a weight of about 6 kg (13.2 lbs). It has short legs and an appearance somewhat like an otter; the ears are short and rounded. The coat is unspotted, uniform in color, and varying from blackish to brownish gray (gray phase) or from foxy red to chestnut (red phase).

    Etymology and naming
    The two color phases were once thought to represent two distinct species; the gray one called jaguarundi, and the red one called eyra. However, these are the same species and both color phases may be found in the same litter. Its coat has no markings except for spots at birth. In some Spanish speaking countries, the jaguarundi is also called leoncillo, which means little lion. Other Spanish common names for the jaguarundi include: "gato colorado", "gato moro", "león brenero", "onza", and "tigrillo". [3]

    Taxonomy and evolution
    This cat is closely related to the much larger and heavier cougar as evident by its similar genetic structure and chromosome count; both species are in the genus Puma although it is sometimes classified under a separate genus, Herpailurus and until recently, both cats were classified under the genus Felis.

    According to a 2006 genomic study of Felidae, an ancestor of today's Leopardus, Lynx, Puma, Prionailurus, and Felis lineages migrated across the Bering land bridge into the Americas approximately 8 to 8.5 million years ago. The lineages subsequently diverged in that order.[4]

    Studies have indicated that the cougar and jaguarundi are next most closely related to the modern cheetah of Africa and western Asia,[4][5] but the relationship is unresolved. It has been suggested that ancestors of the cheetah diverged from the Puma lineage in the Americas and migrated back to Asia and Africa,[4][5] while other research suggests the cheetah diverged in the Old World itself.[6] The outline of small feline migration to the Americas is thus unclear (see also American cheetah).

    Ecology
    Its habitat is lowland brush areas close to a source of running water. It occasionally inhabits dense tropical areas as well. It is crepuscular and nocturnal depending on location. This cat is comfortable in trees, but prefers to hunt on the ground. It preys upon fish, small mammals, reptiles and birds.

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    It must have been so scarry being stalked by such a large and dangerous cat.

    This is a Florida bobcat:
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    Last edited by klkak; 12-01-2008 at 07:07 PM.
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  14. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerXanatos View Post
    So this bear could possibly have a hurt foot. This means to me that either you can catch up with it quickly and be eating for a while, or that it could be in a very bad mood for any company that it might encounter...
    I didn't say it had a hurt foot.
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    erunk,

    You were probably stalked by a Florida Panther, they do exist and they are also called pumas, mountain lions, and cougars.

    I'm no expert on the critters, but back when my team was being stalked, I think that if one of us had been isolated, it may have decided to try for lunch.

    Now, I've seen some really big bobcats, matter of fact, across the street years ago there was one that was about as big as the 60lb dog we have.

  16. #196
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    FVR, one spring on my uncles ranch while the ewe's were lambing we started loosing lambs. One every 2 or 3 days. Well my cousin Joe finally got a look at what was taking the lambs. We set an ambush for it and killed it.

    It was a bobcat that weight 44 pounds. It was taller then any of the dogs on the place. We turned it over to Fish and Game. They said it was a 5 year old male in perfect physical condition. Uncle lost 12 lambs to that cat. Back then lambs went $40.00 ea.
    1. If it's in your kit and you don't know how to use it....It's useless.
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  17. #197
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    People don't realize how big bobcats can get.

    Now, the bear question.

    Looks to me that the bear is lame. You mentioned that the "front paw print" not prints but print.

    If the bear has a lame leg, it's going to have to hop or jump which might just leave the rear print on the front print.

    Not stepping on branches or limbs, the critter may just have two lame front legs, one just a bit more than the other.

    As far as hunting, I don't hunt bears. But my curiosity would be sparked and I would have to track it until I found it. If I did not have a firearm capable of taking down an injured bear, I would let it pass.



    I missed your answer, I was way off.
    Last edited by FVR; 12-02-2008 at 12:11 AM.

  18. #198
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    FVR, I corrected my post to read:

    There you are out hunting meat for the pot. You come across some very fresh black bear tracks. The front paw prints are 4 inches wide.

    You notice that this bear never steps on a twig or rock and it is putting it's back paws into the tracks left by the front paws.

    The tracks indicate the bear is pigeon toed (feet pointing in word).

    The bear stays under cover but does not push through heavy brush.

    Is this bear worth hunting for meat?
    Explain why..
    The size of the track isn't always a good indicator of whether a bear is worth hunting (for meat). Where it puts its foot down is important as is the path it takes through the woods.

    Think about this:
    Would you want to eat an old animal or a young animal?

    How can you tell the difference by the tracks?
    Last edited by klkak; 12-02-2008 at 03:47 AM.
    1. If it's in your kit and you don't know how to use it....It's useless.
    2. If you can't reach your kit when you need it....Its useless.

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  19. #199
    Senior Member Aurelius95's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FVR View Post
    Medium size?

    Round.

    Soft edges.

    140 pound Georgia Mountain Lion


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    Georgia hunters have been claiming for years that they see cougars, aka mountain lions, and black panthers, but the DNR has called such sightings bs. This cat was shot during deer season as there is no season for it, so it's fair game. There was also another cat, same one?? photo'd 25 miles away.

    I was just down in Warner Robins, GA for Thanksgiving. My wife's grandparents were camping at the park in West Point, GA where the mountain lion was killed. Her granddad took some of his own pictures (I'll have to get him to email them to me). They said that there were DNR people all around the park for a few days before they realized what they were looking for. The cat was killed on a trail that they had hiked earlier.
    Not all who wander are lost - Tolkien

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