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Thread: Do you have what it takes

  1. #21
    Neo-Numptie DOGMAN's Avatar
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    Well right now were I am...it is hunting season, and a heat source will be mandatory soon...so, I was thinking in those terms. Right now fishing and hunting are great in MT...as is firewood gathering
    The way of the canoe is the way of the wilderness and of a freedom almost forgotten- Sigurd Olson

    Give me winter, give me dogs... you can keep the rest- Knud Rasmussen


  2. #22

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    Seems to me there are two aspects to the question: 1) would you be physically, mechanically able to survive, and 2) could you cope psychologically?

    Physically, it's a matter of skills and/or equipment. Enough equipment and you don't need much skill; enough skill and you don't need much equipment. Hike in with a big ol backpack full of stuff and pretty much anyone can survive. A primitive skills practitioner, however, might get by without even a knife. Most of us probably are somewhere in the middle, which means that physically, the answer to the question would depend on what equipment we had.

    Psychologically, no one really knows until it happens if they "have what it takes." I've spent long periods of time alone in the bush and a kind of wild, soul-wrenching loneliness creeps up on you sometimes. For me, it passes as long as I keep my mind active, learning new plants in the area, crafting, etc. But for some people it doesn't. I've had friends tell me they've completely freaked out for this reason.

    Long term, for a lot of people, it's not even worth surviving without the "tribe" of family, friends, etc.

  3. #23
    Senior Member laughing beetle's Avatar
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    Hi Dave! I like your response to the question. Seems well thought out. If you would'nt mind...How about heading over to the Introductions thread and tell us a little about yourself. Thanks - LB
    Turtle Clan / Coffee Addicts Anonymous

  4. #24
    Senior Member Runs With Beer's Avatar
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    FVR, That some good thinking. When you realy brake it down its a lot more work than we start out to think. Lots of work!

  5. #25

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    Oh yeah, I meant to add, but forgot. Re: loneliness of isolation in the wilderness. This is probably the reason why schools like Tom Brown's emphasize that sappy, "Mother Earth" nature mysticism point of view. "You're not in the wilderness; you're at home. Mother Earth loves you, and provides for you if you know how to look. Be at ease. Lay on your belly in the mud, in the tall waving grass, for this is how men were meant to live..." etc. The advantage of thinking this way is psychological; the disadvantage is, if you talk about it, you sound like a complete wanker

  6. #26
    Coming through klkak's Avatar
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    I have lived off the land. I still can and would again if the need arose.
    1. If it's in your kit and you don't know how to use it....It's useless.
    2. If you can't reach your kit when you need it....Its useless.

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  7. #27
    Neo-Numptie DOGMAN's Avatar
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    I dug up this old pic of the straw bale cabin I built. This is what it looked like all winter- unfinished, straw bales with some fencing and tarp wrapped around it. We eventually had ice cycles going all the way to the ground! The dog is Luna- my very first sled dog. She was trying to break in!
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    Last edited by DOGMAN; 10-21-2008 at 03:02 AM.
    The way of the canoe is the way of the wilderness and of a freedom almost forgotten- Sigurd Olson

    Give me winter, give me dogs... you can keep the rest- Knud Rasmussen

  8. #28
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Yes 234567
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

  9. #29
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    The OP was "could you live off the land". I say why not? Others did it . I assume most of us engage our brains before we venture out on the land .
    Many of the people from days gone by did not start from living in one wilderness and moving to another without tools or knowledge . Actualy I think we would possiably have an advantage with knowledge at our finger tips and able to obtain the best tools. Back in the day people had a lot of trial and error and some failed we have the advantage of more avaliable knowledge . I would venture that most that went out naked or just with what was on their backs failed or perished.
    KNOWLEDGE the ulitmate survival tool

    I AM HURT BUT NOT SLAIN, I WILL LIE DOWN AND BLEED A WHILE THEN I WILL RISE UP AND FIGHT AGAIN.

  10. #30
    Cold Heartless Breed tsitenha's Avatar
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    Transition would be interesting but yes, although I choose to live in a village for the now.

  11. #31
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    Physically i could not do it. But it would be much easier if there were more than one person. If I took my family I think we would have a pretty good chance.

  12. #32

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    first post, but Physically i could do it and am almost 69. but in modern America as we know it today, it would be rough in any part of the country. Everyone has their land posted, even to go on government or state land would be a hassel permission,permits,fires, weapons ect. When i was a kid there were hardly any boundries when camping, hunting or fishing. you could even camp out in a railroad yd then, just try crossing one now.


    Then lawyers got tired of chasing ambulances and started those frivioulas law suits. like hunter John went on jacks land and fell down,lets sue the owner, then no tresspassing signs were invented and John is limited as to where he can go with out a lot of problems.
    most of your time will be spent trying to keep from starving and in winter in the north, keep from freezing.
    Even if there was a SHTf situation and the laws weren't enforced, everybody and their brother would be trying to play Danial B, more game would probably die from bad wounds than eaten. many couldn't even catch a starving catfish in a bath tub with a hook and string.

  13. #33
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
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    We could where we are if we wanted to and were willing to disregard the hunting regs. Neither of us would be happy in the long term with moose, trout and pike for breakfast, lunch and dinner every day though, and edible greens are exremely slim pickings up here.

    I don't know any person living in the bush who completely "lives off the land". It's largely a romantic notion fostered by people who don't live in the bush, it seems.
    Actions speak louder than words

  14. #34
    Loner Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildWoman View Post
    I don't know any person living in the bush who completely "lives off the land". It's largely a romantic notion fostered by people who don't live in the bush, it seems.
    Some do, many have. My father-in-law who turned 100 years old in September, grew up on a 80 acre farm in up-state NY, in the middle of no where. They raised dairy cows, chickens, pigs etc. for meat & dairy products, hunted deer, ducks, and also fished (made their bows, arrows, knives, fishing poles, hooks etc). Grew many types of vegetables and did a lot of canning. They were self sufficient. They lived without electric. I love talking to him about what it was like back then. Just amazing the things we take for granted. So it's not a romantic notion.
    "A person is not finished when they are defeated.
    A person is finished when they quit."

  15. #35
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gray Wolf View Post
    Some do, many have. My father-in-law who turned 100 years old in September, grew up on a 80 acre farm in up-state NY, in the middle of no where. They raised dairy cows, chickens, pigs etc. for meat & dairy products, hunted deer, ducks, and also fished (made their bows, arrows, knives, fishing poles, hooks etc). Grew many types of vegetables and did a lot of canning. They were self sufficient. They lived without electric. I love talking to him about what it was like back then. Just amazing the things we take for granted. So it's not a romantic notion.
    I guess it depends on where you live and what the definition of "living off the land" is. I had interpreted it as eating only wild game, fish and greens, which would not be a joy to do up in the far north as far as the green stuf goes. With farming of course, that's a whole different ball game.
    Still, being completely self-sufficient in the sense of growing and making all products you consume or use would, I think, mean going back to the Stone Age. Stuff like windows, stoves, pots and pans, lamps, tools etc come from the outside world, so there is always some sort of link through bartering or buying.
    It just seems to me from some posts on here and stuff you read in some books that people think they can just wander off into the woods, cut all ties and responsibilities to the rest of the world, and live there happily ever after. To me, that's a romantic notion, at least in the more northern regions of the world. Maybe around the equator it might work.
    Actions speak louder than words

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildWoman View Post
    I guess it depends on where you live and what the definition of "living off the land" is. I had interpreted it as eating only wild game, fish and greens, which would not be a joy to do up in the far north as far as the green stuf goes. With farming of course, that's a whole different ball game.
    Still, being completely self-sufficient in the sense of growing and making all products you consume or use would, I think, mean going back to the Stone Age. Stuff like windows, stoves, pots and pans, lamps, tools etc come from the outside world, so there is always some sort of link through bartering or buying.
    It just seems to me from some posts on here and stuff you read in some books that people think they can just wander off into the woods, cut all ties and responsibilities to the rest of the world, and live there happily ever after. To me, that's a romantic notion, at least in the more northern regions of the world. Maybe around the equator it might work.

    wildWomen, I agree with you. And while reading your post, a Rare Thought struck me, I wonder if the reason so many think it would be easy to live off the land. Is because they have spent most of their life living "OFF" their parents, or the system. I wonder if anyone on the planet lives totally off the land. I guess a few, they had those WWII guys hiding in the Philippine Islands.

  17. #37

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    Thinking and doing are two different things, right now due to unemployment I am in a semi survival mode, I am keeping warm, it has not been to cold yet, on the other hand I turned down two shots on White Tail Deer due to it being to warm to keep meat with out having a refer. I am some what lucky, I have a car, and internet is free at the local Library. I have plenty of wood where I am, but like its been said, cutting and splitting wood for a whole winter, is dam near a full time job from July to Oct. Looking for work is also a full time job.

  18. #38
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Good luck with the job search BH. In the meantime, why not head over to the introduction section and let us know a bit about yourself. I look forward to your insight on living frugal. Thanks.
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  19. #39
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    do i have what it takes? well ifn i don't i'm getting closer every day
    always be prepared-prepare all ways
    http://wareaglesurvival.blogspot.com

  20. #40
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BH206L3 View Post
    Thinking and doing are two different things, right now due to unemployment I am in a semi survival mode, I am keeping warm, it has not been to cold yet, on the other hand I turned down two shots on White Tail Deer due to it being to warm to keep meat with out having a refer. I am some what lucky, I have a car, and internet is free at the local Library. I have plenty of wood where I am, but like its been said, cutting and splitting wood for a whole winter, is dam near a full time job from July to Oct. Looking for work is also a full time job.
    dude when i was a young buck a few years ago i lived out of my truck in pheonix, i was a pro bull rider not very good but good enough, i dated agirl that was a manager at a denny's resturant that had the all you can eat breakfast buffet well i would load up a freezer sized zipp lock baggie and eat on taht the rest of the day then go to the gym work out shower then go ride practice bulls or head to the rodeos on the weekends man what great times, it may seem bad rigth now but savor the moment cuz you are living in the moment right here and now, you are the lucky one
    always be prepared-prepare all ways
    http://wareaglesurvival.blogspot.com

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