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Thread: Traps & Trapping

  1. #1
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Default Traps & Trapping

    Alot has been asked lately on this so here's what I do.
    Successful Fur Trapping by Keith Blackwood Paperback ISBN 9781410758477 & FUR-FISH-GAME Magazine These are good for learning.
    Before any trapper starts trapping I think all trappers should be familar with what trap sizes should be used for the fur bearers we intend to catch. For example I wouldnt use a #4 long spring to catch muskrats as it is to large of a trap. Below are some of my trap size recomedations for some of the common furbearers. If a furbear is not listed I recommend using a trap recommended for a simular sized furbearer. But that's just how I do it when I trap.
    Beaver
    #3 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 1/4 inches
    #3coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #3 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #4 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #4 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #5 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 8 3/8 inches
    #220 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 7" x 7"
    #280 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 8" x 8"
    #330 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 10" x 10"
    Mink
    #1 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #1 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 4 1/4 inches
    #1 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #11 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 7/8 inches
    #1 1/2 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 inches
    #1 1/2 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 3/4 inches
    #110 Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 4 1/2" x 4 1/2"
    #120 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 4 1/2" x 4 1/2"
    #160 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 6" x 6"
    Muskrat
    #1 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #1 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 4 1/4 inches
    #1 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #11 longspring ( two springs) Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 7/8 inches
    #1 1/2 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 inches
    #1 1/2 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 3/4 inches
    #110 Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 4 1/2" x 4 1/2"
    #120 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 4 1/2" x 4 1/2"
    #160 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 6" x 6"
    Opossum
    #1 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #1 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 4 1/4 inches
    #1 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #11 longspring ( two springs) Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 7/8 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 inches
    # 1 1/2 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 3/4 inches
    # 1 3/4 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 3/8 inches
    # 2 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 3/4 inches
    #160 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 6" x 6"
    #220 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 7" x 7"
    Otter
    #2 coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #3 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 1/4 inches
    #3coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #3 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #4 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #4 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #220 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 7" x 7"
    #280 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 8" x 8"
    #330 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 10" x 10"
    Raccoon
    #1 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #1 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 4 1/4 inches
    #1 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #11 longspring ( two springs) Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 7/8 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 inches
    # 1 1/2 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 3/4 inches
    # 2 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 3/4 inches
    #160 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 6" x 6"
    #220 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 7" x 7"
    #280 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 8" x 8"
    Skunk
    #1 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #1 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 4 1/4 inches
    #1 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    #11 longspring ( two springs) Approximate Jaw spread 4 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 7/8 inches
    # 1 1/2 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 inches
    # 1 1/2 longspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 3/4 inches
    #160 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 6" x 6"
    #220 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 7" x 7"
    Weasel
    # 0 Longspring Approximate Jaw spread 3 1/2 inches
    #110 Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 4 1/2" x 4 1/2"
    #120 Double spring Conibear Aproximate jaw spread 4 1/2" x 4 1/2"
    Large Predators:
    Bobcat (Although I prefer to hunt using my flintlock or .22)
    #1 3/4 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 3/8 inches
    #2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #2 coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #3 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 1/4 inches
    #3coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #3 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    Coyote (Although I prefer to hunt using my flintlock or .22)
    #1 3/4 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 3/8 inches
    #2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #2 coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #3 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 1/4 inches
    #3coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    #3 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #4 Double longspring Approximate Jaw spread 6 inches
    Fox (Although I prefer to hunt using my flintlock or .22)
    # 1 1/2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 4 7/8 inches
    #1 1/2 coilspring padded jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 inches
    #1 3/4 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 3/8 inches
    #2 coilspring Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    #2 coilspring Padded Jaws Approximate Jaw spread 5 1/2 inches
    I hope you found this info helpful in your trap selection. By using the proper size traps for the target animal you will produce a better catch with less damage and pain to the animal. There are many traps on the market today but it is your responsibility if your going to trap to use the proper one for the job.
    Hope this helps you out.
    Beo,
    Remember, this is my way of doing it and others on here with more experience may may be able to tell you better, my traps are based off of the rules and regs for Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana which is why they are so varried and I thre in some others made for those animals, check the regs in your area for what is allowed.




    Last edited by Beo; 08-26-2008 at 08:46 AM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.


  2. #2
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Preparing traps is also very important so here's what I do. Others do not do this but I sell my furs in Friendship Indiana so I take the time to do it this way, PGVOutdoors is a Guide here in Ohio so he and others may be of better use in how they do it.
    Step #1 Cleaning
    The first thing that needs to be done to all your traps is for them to be cleaned . Whether the traps are new or used they need to be cleaned properly before dyeing and waxing.
    Cleaning is accomplished by boiling the traps in water with baking soda. Or for those real nasty traps, a Lye solution can be used. Lye is found in most drain openers such as Draino, Liquid Plumber and many others. Be very careful when using any lye product as it can be harmful to your skin and eyes and should not be breathed in. You can use almost any metal pot for the cleaning task. Ask your parents (if your a minor) if they have any old pots they don't use or look at garage or yard sales. You will need BIG pots, usually something that will hold 5 gallons or more of water. I have been able to find some very nice stainless pots at buisnesses that specialize in used restaurant equipment. Bring your cleaning solution to a boil and place traps slowly in the boiling water. Be careful not to get splashed as the water will burn you. Before cleaning, dyeing and waxing your traps place a smalI finishing nail between the trap jaws to keep the trap partially opened so that the cleaning, dyeing and waxing can get to the jaws of the traps also. I usually treat 6 traps at a time. To do this I wire the chains together with a little 14 gauge wire. Leave enough wire to hang outside the boiling pot for easy trap removal. This is handy for removing the traps when they are done and will come in handy later for dyeing & waxing. Leave the traps in the cleaning solution for 30 to 60 minutes. When done, lift the traps out of the boiling water, and hang outdoors to air dry. I usually hang them from a branch in a tree or from a nail in the trapshed.
    The purpose of cleaning the traps is to remove any scents, blood and debris from used traps and the oil they coat the new traps with.
    The traps should take on a light coat of rust almost immediately, this is good since the light rust will aid in the adhesion of the dye. Avoid having your traps come in contact with anything that may contaminate them from this point on such as odors.
    You just cleaned the traps to remove all the odors so keep them scent free. Always wear rubber gloves when handling your traps after boiling.
    Step #2 Dyeing

    Now that your traps are clean and free of odors, grease and oil, you are ready to apply a coat of dye to them.
    Dyeing accomplishes two very important functions. It prevents the rust from form will help makeing while the traps are set, and it
    colors the traps either a deep dark black/ blue color or brown color. This will help make the traps blend in with the soil or bottom cover of the area you are trapping. After cleaning and scrubbing your pot from the cleaning process, add about 4 or 5 gallons of fresh water to the pot along with 1 pound of logwood crystals or powder. I prefer logwood crystals as my dyeing method over speed dips, but the choice is up to you. Bring the water to a boil again and add the crystals or powder, mix well till all the trap dye is disolved. Again be careful not to get splashed by the water as it will burn you.
    Also be sure to wear you rubber gloves during this process or you will wear the dye on your hands for weeks. And dont forget to leave that extra pice of wire hanging over the outside of the pot for easy removal. And also leave the nail in betwen the jaws of the trap. I usually check the traps after 45 mins to an hour in the solution to see if they are the color I want. If they are not dark enough for you, place them back in the pot. After the color is achieved, again hang the traps outdoors free of odors to dry completely.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Step #3 Waxing
    For this procedure you should use a different clean pot. Save your other pot for boiling and dyeing, but obtain a seperate pot for the waxing process. I wax traps for two reasons. The first is that the wax will protect and seal the trap while it is being used. The wax seals in any odor that may take place while a trap is oxidizing while set. Secodly, the wax also speeds up the closing of the jaws of the trap resulting in, a faster trap and fewer misses. First you will need to obtain your trap wax. Melt enough wax so that when you dip your traps they will be completely covered, so the whole trap gets protected during the process. Be extremely careful of wax splashing like above as it is hot and can severely burn you. SO BE CAREFUL!!!!
    If your wax starts to smoke, it is TOO HOT, remove from heat and lower the temperature before continuing. Wax is explosiveand may burst in to flames if it gets too hot. Waxing should be done only with parental supervision (if your a mnor) or another veteran trapper.You may also want to make sure the traps you intend to wax are totally dry as any water that is on the traps can also cause an explosion if it comes into contact with the hot wax. Again leave the nail between the jaws as you want to protect the inside of the jaws as well as the rest of the trap. After your wax is melted, start dipping the traps in the wax using the wire thatwe attatched to the chains at the beginning of the cleaning process, and again, wear rubber gloves. You only want a thin layer of the wax on your traps so usually a minute or two in the wax is all that is needed. Pull the traps out slowly so that the excess wax has a chance to drip off, then shake the traps to remove more
    excess wax. Waxing is best done outdoors for this reason as well as others mentioned above.Now hang the traps outdoors away from odors. I usually hang the traps in my shed till the season starts or if need be you can let them dry on cardboard if you have no spot to hang them from while they dry.
    Now let them hang till season opens or pack them in plastic storage bins, and seal with duct tape to keep them from getting contaminated. Remember when you go to remove the traps the next season to start trapping, WEAR YOUR RUBBER GLOVES you do not want to contaminate them after all the hard work you have put in to get them ready.
    Remember this is my way and others on here have there way, PGVOutdoors, Lady Trapper, WE, Trax, FVR, and others may have simpler, easier, or better ways, this is how I was taught by my Grandpop.
    Hope this helps any who had questions.
    Beo,
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Check it out babypops, you went to all the trouble of preparing your traps and then trapping your furbearing animal, and now what. Here are a few things I do and the way I do it.
    Proper Pelt Care
    REMOVAL FROM TRAPS
    Care should be taken when removing animals from traps especially if they are frozen. Simply prying an animal out of a trap may remove portions of fur and damage pelts. If furbearers are completely frozen in traps, it would be wise to take the furbearer still in the trap to your camp or fur shed and remove it after it has thawed.
    TRANSPORTING
    Furbearers should be transported in clean burlap or nylon bags (feed sacks) to ensure that they remain clean and that blood or dirt from one animal is not transferred to another. Never place wet furbearers directly onto metal racks of ATV's or snowmobiles or the box of a pickup truck in freezing weather. They will become badly frozen on and difficult to remove without doing major damage to the fur.
    CLEANING/STORAGE
    In general, ideally furbearers should dry before pelting. Furbearers should be brushed lightly before pelting to remove burrs, mats and dirt, which may stain the fur, and cause cuts in the pelting process. If animals are badly soiled, they should be washed lightly with clean water and allowed to dry before pelting commences. If you cannot skin animals shortly after harvesting, or if you choose to rough skin pelts and flesh at a later date, they should be frozen to preserve quality. Place furbearers or pelts in plastic bags and remove as much air as possible. Tie tightly and place in a freezer. Pelts that are to be frozen should be rolled nose to tail, leather in. Thaw slowly to prevent hair slip before pelting or fleshing. After fleshing and drying, pelts should be shipped to market as soon as possible. If you must store pelts for long periods they should be placed in a freezer. For short periods of storage, keep in a dark, cool dry room. Pelts may be wrapped lightly in newsprint, stored in burlap or nylon bags or hung from hooks or rafters. Ship to market in clean bags or cardboard boxes, never in plastic bags.
    PELT SIZES
    While it is never wise to over-stretch fur, there are times when pelts will be on the borderline between two sizes when they are placed on the board. Pelts shrink slightly in length during drying, so it may be to the trapper's advantage to stretch these borderline pelts just a little more to bring them up to the next largest size. To accommodate this, having the pelt sizes marked on your boards for each species may be helpful.
    Should pelts be open skinned or cased?
    Beaver: Open skinned.
    Mink: Cased and fur in - it is recommended that saddle be left on but remove all grease from under the saddle.
    Otter: Cased and fur in.
    Marten: Cased and fur out.
    Fisher: Cased and fur out.
    Bobcat: Cased and fur out.
    Muskrat: Cased and fur in - do not over scrape, remove all surface grease but leave saddle on.
    Raccoon: Cased and fur in.
    Fox: Cased and fur out.
    Coyote: Cased and fur out.
    Squirrel & Weasel: Cased and fur in.
    Skunk: Cased and fur in.
    Opossum: Cased and fur in.
    Badger: Cased and fur in.

    Hope this helps you all.
    Beo,


    Last edited by Beo; 08-20-2008 at 10:39 AM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  5. #5
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Animal Tracks, if your gonna trap you should know what the tracks of your prey look like, as outdoors people here we should all know what these look like, Here are a few.
    In the tracking chart below you will find many of wildlife species. As trappers and hunters we should be very knowledgeable on what furbearer's we are targeting. And which other critters may be a potential problem in the areas we trap and hunt.
    How to use this chart: This chart has been broken into groups by track patterns meaning how the animal steps one foot after the other. These pictures are not actual size so use the measurements provided for each track. Each foot is labled with a "F" meaning that track is a front foot track of the animal shown. Or it's labeled with a "H" meaning that track is a hind foot track of the animal shown.
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    Last edited by Beo; 08-20-2008 at 11:08 AM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    ***NOTE*** All of this and more are in my blog, so if you want more info or how I do things check them out, this is by no means how it is done, but how it is done by me. This is as in depth as I can get as anything else is past my knowledge, others on this site are as knowledgeable or know more than I door, once again some of these members are WE, Trax, FVR, PGVOutdoors, Catfish10101, Trappiing Lady, Robert Rogers, mitch.chesney, medicine wolf, and others who either do this as a sport, hobby, for a living, or because they live Off-the-Grid, so they may have imput I forgot, that is different, or even better. (Anyone I forgot or left out that does trapping I am sorry, I talk to so many people on here and in PMs I forget, so please forgive) AND BE CAREFUL WHEN PREPARING TRAPS AND TRAPPING, HAVE FUN, BE SAFE, DRIVE ON, AND COWBOY UP IF THNGS DON'T GO RIGHT AT FIRST ITS A LEARNING PROCESS AND TAKES TIME.
    Hope all this helps you.
    Beo,
    This is a great site for all your trapping needs and where I get most of my supplies. http://www.rpoutdoors.com/
    Last edited by Beo; 08-26-2008 at 11:23 AM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Protector Of The Land MedicineWolf's Avatar
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    Really good post bro, alot to read but great stuff.
    I see your still trapping and seems to me a good teacher
    for Trooper and anyone here wanting to learn.
    Living in the Northern part of the Lewis and Clark National Forest as a Ranger with US Forestry Service... What more could a guy want

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    Loner Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    Outstanding post Beo!!! Should be made a sticky.
    "A person is not finished when they are defeated.
    A person is finished when they quit."

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Good post and sticky'ed. It's missing the track of the rubber Big Foot!

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    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Excellent work Beo. Nicely done.

    Hey Rick, share a little moderator trade secret with us...what do you do to make the posts "sticky"....

    No, on second thought maybe we don't want to know
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    First, you take a pinch of Newt tail. That can be just as tricky as it sounds. Then you.....

    Moderators have a drop down box for Thread Tools.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    or you could use duct tape.
    Can't Means Won't

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Duct tape works on everything. If ya can't fix duct it.
    Thanks all, anyone here that is new to trapping feel free to copy and print this, I could careless its not copyrighted,
    if it helps you fine, also I would most definately talk to Traggin Gal as she probably knows a lot more than I do, from
    her postings on here I would say she is a top notch trapper.
    Last edited by Beo; 08-20-2008 at 05:28 PM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    If it moves and it shouldn't, duct tape it. If it doesn't move and it should, WD40. The only two rules of life you will ever need to know!

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    in wisconsin you have to take a class before you can get a licence.
    If i don't get some whiskey soon i'm going to die!!!!!! didn't put eough dirt down saw it right off...

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    Senior Member Riverrat's Avatar
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    Great post Beo...and the same as skunkkiller said, you have to take a class in New Brunswick, unless you can prove you had a licence before. I used to trap every fall, and am strongley thinking about it this fall, even to the point of doing some scouting.

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    Senior Member Riverrat's Avatar
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    Also for Canadian trappers, here is a great site to go and ask questions on the differant laws. It is great for anyone to get info on differnant sets.

    http://www.trapper.ca/cnta/index.php

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    Senior Member flandersander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riverrat View Post
    Also for Canadian trappers, here is a great site to go and ask questions on the differant laws. It is great for anyone to get info on differnant sets.

    http://www.trapper.ca/cnta/index.php


    Thanks broski. Great site!

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    Loner Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    Here's a link to "The Project Gutenberg EBook of Camp Life in the Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and Trap Making, by William Hamilton Gibson".

    Lots of traps, snares and the making of them. Teaches how to gather and make scents for your traps, and much more. A very informative FREE book (240 pages). Release Date: November 18, 2005
    Enjoy!

    http://www.bushcraftuk.com/downloads...inthewoods.pdf
    "A person is not finished when they are defeated.
    A person is finished when they quit."

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    As usual, very nice link. Thanks.
    Can't Means Won't

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