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Thread: A few trail recipes I use

  1. #1
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Default A few trail recipes I use

    From my blog on trail foods I posted these since foods are going round now. Without a doubt I use these on the trail and snack on my parched corn when on the move.

    Maple Pods:
    Maple pods were eaten by the Native Americans and Frontiersmen as a trail food. When doing historical trekking heres what we do.
    When the maple pods (the 'helicopters' you played with as a child) are full yet still green, gather them by the handful. Run your hands down the branch to gather. Take your thumbnail and cut into the end then squeeze out the pod, it will look like a pea/bean. Boil it for about 15 minutes or until soft. Season with butter, salt and pepper. It tastes like a cross between peas and hominy.

    Bannock:
    This bannock recipe makes up a batch of bannock for 24 persons. Cut it down for a simple trek.
    Ingredients 6-1/4 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons salt 1/4 cup baking powder 1/2 cup and 1 teaspoon butter, melted 3 cups and 2 tablespoons water.
    Directions:
    #1 Measure flour, salt, and baking powder into a large bowl. Stir to mix. Pour melted butter and water over flour mixture. Stir with fork to make a ball.
    #2 Turn dough out on a lightly floured surface, and knead gently about 10 times. Pat into a flat circle 3/4 to 1 inch thick.
    #3 Cook in a greased frying pan over medium heat, allowing about 15 minutes for each side. Use two lifters for easy turning.
    The word 'bannock' referred originally to a round unleavened piece of dough, usually about the size of a meat plate, which was baked on the girdle and used by the oven-less Scots/Irish workers.

    Tin Boiler Soup:
    This soup is for 1 person or 2 if you double the mixture..
    1 palm of rice
    1 palm of split peas
    1 palm of lentals
    2 healthy chunks of dried chicken soup ( boulion )
    bring to a boil and simmer for about 1/2 hour. Add several large chunks of jerk or potatoes and simmer until peas are tender.

    Beo's wilderness stew:
    On an recent outting, I put together a good stew in my boiler, here is what it was:
    Hand full of rice
    Hand full of cut carrots
    4 or 5 chunks of venison or jerky
    2 potatoes cut up in chunks
    4 or 5 pepper corns
    Handful of onion
    About 2 cups of water
    Boil everythng together until the rice is done, take out the meat and then cook it on a spit til well browned, put the meat back in and cook for a few more minutes and enjoy. With bread on stick to sop it up it's really good. Try it, I think you'll like it.

    Hope ya like it.
    Beo,
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.


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    Senior Member bulrush's Avatar
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    Wow, Beo. Didn't know you could eat maple seeds. In the early summer I have so many that I use a snow shovel to get rid of them all.

  3. #3
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Good stuff, Beo! I didn't know they were edible either. Merriweather needs to jump in on this thread. He roasts them.

    Here's another resource on trees. Maples are listed last:

    http://www.nps.gov/archive/hocu/html/trees.html

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Rick I love that link! Those are the kind of pics I like for tree and plant i.d.
    Thanks bro,

    Actually if you never had the maple pods try them, I have made so many different flavors using, salt, pepper, crushed pepper, even soaking them in soy sauce, steak seasoning, and frying them in bacon grease (yeah BACON!!!!) for different flavors and they all are pretty good.
    Last edited by Beo; 08-12-2008 at 09:59 AM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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