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Thread: The pantry of my lakeside house needs some help

  1. #21
    Senior Member Deimos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VnVet View Post
    Thank you and we wish you the same.
    And I wish you guys not only happiness, but also a lot of coffe.

    Maybe I should plant something at my property, it's mostly untamed wilderness, since I live in the city and 2 hours away from my "lakeside house".
    I'm thinking about some trees. There is some species of apple that can tolerate our not-so-cold climate, and a vast array of tropical fruits.
    But trees alone won't take away that "I'm in the middle of nowhere" feeling... Maybe I should plant some flowers too, just in case.
    I know some hardcore flowers that can handle that near-wild setting.
    sup


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    Quote Originally Posted by Deimos View Post
    And I wish you guys not only happiness, but also a lot of coffe.

    Maybe I should plant something at my property, it's mostly untamed wilderness, since I live in the city and 2 hours away from my "lakeside house".
    I'm thinking about some trees. There is some species of apple that can tolerate our not-so-cold climate, and a vast array of tropical fruits.
    But trees alone won't take away that "I'm in the middle of nowhere" feeling... Maybe I should plant some flowers too, just in case.
    I know some hardcore flowers that can handle that near-wild setting.

    Once wars were fought over spices and coffee.

    Planting flowers is wise as they attract bees etc. who cross pollinate your vegetables.
    That is if the local 4 legged critters don't eat your vegetables.

    We both know what your "I'm in the middle of nowhere" feeling. To us, it is a big event when someone drives up the road.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Deimos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VnVet View Post

    Once wars were fought over spices and coffee.

    Planting flowers is wise as they attract bees etc. who cross pollinate your vegetables.
    That is if the local 4 legged critters don't eat your vegetables.

    We both know what your "I'm in the middle of nowhere" feeling. To us, it is a big event when someone drives up the road.
    I don't think that I will plant any vegetables, because I don't know if any vegatable can handle being left alone for weeks...
    I don't live at my "lakeside cabin", I live in the city.
    And my lake is actually just a very big pond.
    But it's all mine, along with all the fish and frogs that swim in it since it's fully at my property =)
    sup

  4. #24
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deimos View Post
    It's not a cozy log cabin, it's more of an old wooden house, worn down and then repaired again and again as time went by. When I bougth it, I repaired the holes at the ceiling and changed the broken windows. I also changed some of the wood from the repairs at the wall. Then I trowed all the rotten wood into the lake and that's all.
    I love going there but it's a desolate place, and my wife is always a little scared when we spent the nigth there.
    That sounds like where I live now!

    Except for throwing the old wood in the lake. I burned all of that the first year I was here to stay warm.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

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    There is a feeling of tranquility and beauty here. There is a beauty in the desolation. I belong to a small Veteran's forum. One of the members said a lot of us would love to live in a place similar to yours; the problem is finding a woman willing to live there. Deimos, your wife's feelings are both common place and understandable.

    Although it is difficult to say our nearest neighbor is close to a mile and they are rarely here as weekenders.

    kyratshooter: It sounds the same as where we live.
    When it comes to gathering firewood, we have an advantage.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5t06LbvE3CI
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pla06PO6Odk
    The first time we saw a helicopter cutting it was confusing because we couldn't see the saw. After watching with 10X binoculars, we got it.

    The mountains here have a quite a few powerlines and we have a side by side ATV with a dump bed and chainsaws.


  6. #26
    Senior Member Deimos's Avatar
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    I can't explain why I like desolate places. I don't know why I love that worn down cabin, that pond and that forest so much. If cars didn't exist I would still go there by horse or by foot. A weekend spent there, fishing, hunting, plinking and maybe just reading, is a happy weekend for me.
    sup

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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I have spent a large part of my adult life living in remote areas, often off grid. I would buy a place, fix it up and live there a while and some developer would buy all the land around me for new housing and finally buy me out. I would take the profit and start all over again.

    In the mean time I was living using solar when no one else used solar, generators in emergencies, and using kerosene lamps and Coleman lanterns for light. I have often felt that I spent half my life camping, I just had 4 rickety walls and a leaky roof over my head instead of a tent.

    The place I am at now was the easiest of the homesteads I built. It started out with running water and grid power. I moved here after my wife passed away, 13 years ago. It took me 5 years to get it the way I wanted it, two years wishing I had done it different, and 6 years to do it over!

    I get a real kick out of all the yuppies and gen-Xers going "off grid" and simplifying their lives. Nothing is more complicated, dangerous, and demanding than living off grid! If they are enjoying it they are getting into the truck and going to town a lot.

    All over the world there are remote families praying that TPTB bring them some power poles and water in a pipe!

    We call those spots 3rd world nations.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deimos View Post
    I can't explain why I like desolate places. I don't know why I love that worn down cabin, that pond and that forest so much. If cars didn't exist I would still go there by horse or by foot. A weekend spent there, fishing, hunting, plinking and maybe just reading, is a happy weekend for me.
    Desolate places, or this place bring peace within to me. One loves what brings peace within. There is no need to explain as it is not possible except to say I understand what you are saying because I and we are the same way as you.

    We have a buggy or a side by side ATV and cruise the mountains. OK to be honest, we cruise the power line clear cuts to gather firewood.

    The power company has been doing a lot of clear cutting and we found this.
    mountain house.jpg

    It is miles from "civilization" with no electricity and sanitation was a hole in the ground. How they even got there is beyond me. There was an old barn that has collapsed.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #29
    Senior Member Deimos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VnVet View Post
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Desolate places, or this place bring peace within to me. One loves what brings peace within. There is no need to explain as it is not possible except to say I understand what you are saying because I and we are the same way as you.

    We have a buggy or a side by side ATV and cruise the mountains. OK to be honest, we cruise the power line clear cuts to gather firewood.

    The power company has been doing a lot of clear cutting and we found this.
    mountain house.jpg

    It is miles from "civilization" with no electricity and sanitation was a hole in the ground. How they even got there is beyond me. There was an old barn that has collapsed.

    /FONT]
    That's the best about this forum.
    We not only find people that are concerned about survival, but also people like us, that are truly happy in the nature.
    I would gladly live my life with my dad at his farm, but since I want to have a family with my wife and give them the best that I can, I chosed this patch that lead me into the city. But since my roots are strong, I stayed at a small town and I even bougth my own plot of land, this so-called "lakeside house".
    sup

  10. #30
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    As there wasn't any road to it, no electricity, and a spring for water at the house I posted a picture of; I wonder how they got the materials there to build it.

    This forum is one of the best online.

    Not just the people here, but everyone needs to be prepared. Too many others live in la-la land.
    In 2000, where I lived in SE North Carolina received over 2' of snow. As the usual snowfall would be an inch or so that would melt in the afternoon; the town didn't own a snowplow.
    The power outage lasted from 2AM Monday until 6PM Friday night. A neighbor knocked on the door and asked if we had a coffee pot and some pots and pans she could borrow. Although she had a gas BBQ grill all her cookware was glass and the coffee pot was electric. I loaned her some pots, pans and a Coleman coffee pot from camping. They could be used on a propane grill.

    I grew up on a small farm in the mountains. After college, I was an automotive design type and moved a lot. Which was how I got to fish and hunt in so many places. At my last job, I lived in the western NC mountains on a dirt road. From the windows, I could see 8 to 10 air miles.

  11. #31
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I often wonder how people live without a good cast iron dutch oven!

    VNVET the lumber and materials sitting around that abandoned building look pretty fresh, it's painted, and all the windows are intact. It really looks like someone is using the place. There is probably a creek bed they are driving through to get there and leave no tracks.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 09-20-2022 at 09:30 PM.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    I often wonder how people live without a good cast iron dutch oven!

    VNVET the lumber and materials sitting around that abandoned building look pretty fresh, it's painted, and all the windows are intact. It really looks like someone is using the place. There is probably a creek bed they are driving through to get there and leave no tracks.
    We have a good Dutch oven, an old Lodge. The wife prefers using cast iron to cook with if possible.

    Agreed, the one 2x4 looks look pretty new as did the stone. OTOH, the stone was laid by the power company's work crew. The windows appear to be newer than the building.
    The camera had a telephoto lens; so we weren't as close as the picture looks.
    As it is in the Chattahoochee NF, it isn't there legally.

    To get heavy equipment there, the work crew uses a tracked vehicle as a pusher to get equipment with tires up there as the grade is steep.

    No creek beds that I could see, but I did see a spring. Here there are a lot of springs.
    DSC14.jpg
    We have 3 about this size on our property. Rock springs and I had them tested.

    After the power company's crews are finished, we plan to go back and investigate in more detail. And, to gather free firewood.

  13. #33
    Senior Member Deimos's Avatar
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    I have some cast iron stuff. Some pots, a even a wok.
    I also have an old school semi-portable (it can be moved around but it's heavy and cumbersome) wood stove.
    sup

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deimos View Post
    I have some cast iron stuff. Some pots, a even a wok.
    I also have an old school semi-portable (it can be moved around but it's heavy and cumbersome) wood stove.

    I have a small wood stove in the addition. I've been trying to find a cast iron half teapot to set on it when we use it.

    You reminded me, the remote cabin on the mountain doesn't have a chimney.

    Another great tool for the kitchen is an Alaskan Ulu.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulu
    It is great for dicing onions or apples. It came with a hardwood bowl that matches the curve of the blade..
    On the show "Life below Zero," Agnes uses hers to do almost everything from cutting fish for smoking to skinning animals.


  15. #35
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Ulu's are great. Here's my take on one (mine is sharpened on both sides rather than a chisel grind on one side).

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    Does yours have a chisel grind or what type of grind?

    When it comes to dicing or whatever; the Ulu is hard to beat. My Ulu came with a bowl that has the same radius as the Ulu. It makes scraping everything out super easy.
    We made stuffed acorn squash. Cut them in half adding a small flat on the bottom. Then, fill them with a mix of white, brown and red rice with some homemade loose sausage.

    My favorite method for an absolutely wickedly sharp edge is using 1000 or 6000 abrasive stones. The kit has guides at different angles 15°, 17°, 20° or 22°. The results are similar to honing the edge.

  17. #37
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VnVet View Post
    Does yours have a chisel grind or what type of grind?

    When it comes to dicing or whatever; the Ulu is hard to beat. My Ulu came with a bowl that has the same radius as the Ulu. It makes scraping everything out super easy.
    We made stuffed acorn squash. Cut them in half adding a small flat on the bottom. Then, fill them with a mix of white, brown and red rice with some homemade loose sausage.

    My favorite method for an absolutely wickedly sharp edge is using 1000 or 6000 abrasive stones. The kit has guides at different angles 15°, 17°, 20° or 22°. The results are similar to honing the edge.
    As I said, mine is sharpened on both sides rather than the traditional chisel grind.
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    As I said, mine is sharpened on both sides rather than the traditional chisel grind.


    I'm a retired mechanical design engineer; as a result I'm anal about everything. To avoid issues, I'm married to another anal mechanical design engineer.

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  19. #39
    Senior Member WolfVanZandt's Avatar
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    O.o

    But what happens when y'all disagree about a design?!?
    True enough, my final home is still out there, but this is most certainly my home range and I love it. I love every rock I fall off and tree I trip over. Even when I am close to dying from exhaustion, a beautiful sunset doesn't lose it's power to refresh and inspire me and that, in itself, is enough to save me sometimes.

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    Only a single man (our soon to be) would ask that question….


    Alan
    Last edited by Alan R McDaniel Jr; 09-23-2022 at 06:25 PM.

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