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Thread: Learning To Forage

  1. #1

    Default Learning To Forage

    Foraging has been something I have been learning about. When I went to the mountains, I saw wild onions, rose hips, wild spinach, wild lettuce, pine needles, I saw an herb ( a legal herb) with a small yellow flower...Darn lol I can't remember the name of it. Saw some hog tracks, didnt catch a fish though.
    Thats just the little bit Ive learned and put to practice. I would like to learn more. Are there any good books? For beginners? In depth? Nice clear pics to help identify?

    It was Wild Parsely.


  2. #2
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    There are a series of books called Petersonís Guides that I find helpful.
    Can't Means Won't

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  3. #3
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    What he said.

  4. #4

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    I like the Peterson guides. I have one about rocks and another about medicinal plants and herbs. Is there a separate for foraging? I know the medicinal plant guide tells what the plants can be used for. Is there another guide I am missing?

  5. #5
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Edible Wild Plants: A North American Field Guide to Over 200 Natural Foods


  6. #6

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    Well Golly be willicers. There's a reason why we cultivated edible plants. BECAUSE THEY TASTE BETTER!!!

    This is genetic engineering. Deal with it.

    Trust me. Wild plants foraging sucks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Seems that no one ever realizes that we invented agriculture because foraging wild foods sucks!

    It appears the even Paleolithic humans began rearranging the environment and helping their favorite "wild crops" along as soon as they discovered they had outrun the last glacier. They kept what we today call "orchards" in both Europe and the New World. In the American south east they were heavy into aquaculture, growing several types of aquatic vegetables that that are now extinct.

    In most cases they were not really foraging randomly like a lost hippy, they were going to where they knew the food was growing.

    Same for hunting. They were not out chasing game, they were going to where they knew the food went. Salt licks, feeding areas, well used game trails, stream crossings, and watching from high points that gave sweeping views of large areas.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  8. #8

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    We have a state park in which a portion is manmade ponds. The "native americans" would net and store them alive in these ponds. Not a well known trivia fact.

    I realized very quickly after one or two "Pot and Machete" challenges that ya gotta prep. Or else it is a crappy diet and you'd probably die of malnutrition. Living off the land is over rated challenge. In FL anyway.

    Build a homestead. With that you can thrive.

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