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Thread: Ditched the Smart Phone

  1. #1

    Default Ditched the Smart Phone

    Welp, I took the plunge.
    I'm a fairly young guy, 25 years old. I am a part of the generation that never lived in a world without the internet.

    Luckily, smart phones weren't a reality for us until high school. I still played way too many videogames though. I loved the woods as a boy, but I regret the countless hours of videogames I played instead of countless hours learning about the outdoors.

    After I found a true, spiritual love for nature after a trip to the Rocky Mountains in 2019, I've since become more and more "anti-tech". This new clarity made me realize I simply transferred my child and teenage addiction of videogames to social media. It distracted me at work, at home, and while with friends. I would be thinking of a complex idea--and suddenly feel the need to check my Facebook feed.

    So, I ditched my smartphone and $80/month phone plan for a Nokia 225 brick phone and a $7/month plan.
    I've since been reading more (I NEVER used to read) and finished John Muir's 1000 Mile Walk to the Gulf in 5 days. I feel *more* connected to others ironically.

    If you have not taken the plunge, I highly suggest it. We tend to think technology improves our lives and makes it easier. However, I believe we have since passed that point. We are being dehumanized because of it, dumbed down. It is much harder to read a chapter of a classic book every night than scroll through your Facebook feed. We humans take the easy route.


  2. #2
    Senior Member WolfVanZandt's Avatar
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    Every lifestyle has its hidden pitfalls. Technology tempts you to put too much reliance on it for your survival. The answer isn't to "ditch" it but to understand it and use it in a way that doesn't rob you of your independence.

    Frankly, I went the other direction with cellphones. I wouldn't think of having one until after I retired in 2013 at 60, then I realized what a powerful tool it was to explore the world around me (and I don't mean access to the Discover Channel). I use it on the trail as a camera, a data logger, and an analyzer. Sometimes, I even look up something on it.
    True enough, my final home is still out there, but this is most certainly my home range and I love it. I love every rock I fall off and tree I trip over. Even when I am close to dying from exhaustion, a beautiful sunset doesn't lose it's power to refresh and inspire me and that, in itself, is enough to save me sometimes.

  3. #3
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    The key is to do what's right for you. If you are happy with a brick phone then keep it and enjoy the new freedom you've found. Some folks like to read an actual bible. Some like to read it on their iPhone. Both work.

  4. #4

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    Interesting perspectives. To each their own--I am not knocking anyone's perspective. I am only presenting an unpopular move and talking about its positive benefits.
    Along with my brick phone, I bought a $70 Garmin GPS and a nice HD point and shoot Kodak camera.

    So, I broke up my all-in-one device for 3.

    I am not a conspiracy theorist, but always felt disturbed knowing I was being tracked by google and having my data mined at all times. It makes me feel more private.
    Believe it or not, google mines your emails (even the deleted ones), your searches on ALL websites, location, and much more. They know everything about you.
    Last edited by zedsdead; 08-12-2021 at 09:35 AM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WolfVanZandt View Post
    Every lifestyle has its hidden pitfalls. Technology tempts you to put too much reliance on it for your survival. The answer isn't to "ditch" it but to understand it and use it in a way that doesn't rob you of your independence.

    Frankly, I went the other direction with cellphones. I wouldn't think of having one until after I retired in 2013 at 60, then I realized what a powerful tool it was to explore the world around me (and I don't mean access to the Discover Channel). I use it on the trail as a camera, a data logger, and an analyzer. Sometimes, I even look up something on it.
    Wolf, you sound like you're using your phone for its intended purpose.
    Ever notice these kids who, when sitting outside, will have their eyes locked on SnapChat instead of at the incredible oak in front of them? That is was me.

    When you're on your death bed, you won't remember Jimmy's snapchat story from 2021. You'll remember the majestic oak you passed in your neighborhood every day though.

  6. #6
    Senior Member WolfVanZandt's Avatar
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    Hope so.

    I will agree with Zedsdead though. When I hike out into the mountains with no electronics, it feels like freedom. My main tool as an evaluator was my wrist watch (it had a timer). My retirement was also a divorce from that watch.



    And, yes, I know Google tracks people and they are a lot freer with the info they get than I'd like, but, then, Google isn't the only one and the information is out there anyway. I'm not a private person. I know what they know.
    True enough, my final home is still out there, but this is most certainly my home range and I love it. I love every rock I fall off and tree I trip over. Even when I am close to dying from exhaustion, a beautiful sunset doesn't lose it's power to refresh and inspire me and that, in itself, is enough to save me sometimes.

  7. #7
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    If you are worried about being mined for information then you better stay off the internet too.

    You will find that this very forum has add bars that are specifically tailored to your previous internet searches for information and goods.

    Many is the time I have returned from a run to Lowes or Home Depot to find adds on my computer screen concerning the products I just purchased or associated goods.

    Myself, I have not talked on my phone in months, but I text my kids and friends daily, plan trips and navigation and use the resource apps freely. All the while, knowing that in the modern world anything I text to anyone can be used in court against me if someone gets a wild hair up their butt. I constantly wonder why important people text the crap they do, knowing they are being tracked, and often think that they are being set up with hacked texts and tweets.

    I find that the Google Earth program on my phone is better for my use than my Tom Tom. The phone gives me walking and bike routes and does not fight me when I try to change the selected route the device thinks best. I can also download GAIA, Gut Hook and other navigation apps on my smartphone. I even have the TAT on my phone as a coast to coast off-road navigation route.

    Are they tracking me? Why me? I am of no importance in the grand scheme.

    And if they are tracking me there are traffic cameras (15 of them between my home and town), credit card tracking programs and cameras on the ATM to keep me in sight and even let TPTB know about how much cash I have in my pockets, if they really care.

    If you are worried about TEOTWAWKI type survival then the worries of now have no connection to the worries then.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  8. #8

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    Yes, societal data mining was not my main concern for ditching the smart phone.

    An important point though none-the-less! PayPal recently teamed up with the ADL to "fight extremism and hate through the financial industry and across at-risk communities"
    Financial institutions are getting in the business of political correctness. Very scary stuff.

    I am sure the ADL will utilize Google and social media data to figure who is apart of a "hate group" or "extremist movement" and who is not.

    "PayPal and ADL will focus on further uncovering and disrupting the financial pipelines that support extremist and hate movements"
    Who will be the arbiter of determining what a "hate movement" is? Is this group's message a hateful one, or an unpopular truth? Whoever they are, they are trying to block people they disagree with from their pocket books.

    Now I am on a tangent...

    https://www.adl.org/news/press-relea...in5gXbnJMsMxqg

  9. #9
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Tangent? That has to be hate speech to someone. I'll bet that's racist to tangerines. Tangerines aren't really tan you know.

  10. #10
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    Tangent needs to be reassigned a more gender neutral name. Tanperson... mmmm...Maybe not... Non-anyothercolorbuttan-person....

    I give up....


    Alan

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