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Thread: Buck GCK (ground combat knife)

  1. #1

    Default Buck GCK (ground combat knife)

    Have any of you guys seen this knife? Itís a spear point blade . Also Buck makes a Tanto point version of it. Comes in black, and coyote . Itís blade is made of 5160 high carbon steel.
    I have only seen a couple reviews on this knife . Both reviews were with the spear point. It did all camp test fairly well. From batoning to feather sticks. If you have one or seen one let me know what you think.
    All forgot to mention the sheath is decent also.


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  2. #2

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    Itís a fairly knew knife from Buck. Knife Center has them for $99.00 . One time this summer I think the Buck G.C.K was on sale at knife center for $80.00. Anyway I wanted to say itís not a bush craft type knife as itís name says itís a combat knife.
    Although in the reviews and test it did well in the bushcraft task . Feather sticks, batoning. I think it would be worth looking into.


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  3. #3
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    It is a mass produced blade from one of the major manufacturers so it will probably be a decent and usable product.

    Descriptions, features and "reviews" are generally irrelevant when it comes to knives, since they are very personal items. You won't know if you really like it until you have whittled a fence post down to a toothpick.

    If you want it, buy it.

    If you decide you don't like it half way through the fence post sell it on Ebay.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  4. #4
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    Most knives are worn out on a whetstone and most rifle barrels are worn out by cleaning rods. I've got cigar boxes full of knives I used for a year or six months and put away. I've got a very few knives that I carry and use every day. I've never worn one out through use or abuse. It's always on the stone that they disappear.


    Alan

  5. #5

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    The wear rate of the knife depends on the quality of the steel as well as the tools used for sharpening. I have high carbon steel knives and have bought quality stones. Correct sharpening of the edge takes a long time, but the knife remains sharp for a long time and there is no need to constantly comb the blade against stones.

  6. #6
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I had to get another cup of coffee and have some breakfast before I came back to this one.

    There are numerous highly subjective terms put forth that make a difference in evaluations.

    High carbon steel= now that stuff varies greatly, and some stainless is preferable to some "high carbon" in specific applications.

    Quality stones= That used to be a hot topic back in the 1960s. Now one will find that most knife guys will argue over the quality of their diamond hones. The real collectors would die of heart attack if you came near one of their blades with a sharpening device.

    Correct sharpening= Good luck with that one. You'll have advocates for slicing the stone, dragging the blade and the swirling motion, all in use by someone the swears their technique is best. I have seen cooks on TV almost get into knife fights over that one.

    Stays sharp for a long time= Here we go, what is "sharp" and what is a "long time"?

    Now bear in mind that we do not have any buffalo skinners here, or professional moose hunters that skin and bone the meat on their clients' kills, and the meat packing industry now uses band saws for most of their cutting needs, and never did go in much for "custom knives" for assembly line processing.

    You will find that the folks here go from the machete side, with the subsequent beating and banging and resharpening on a river rock, all the way to the prized favorite pocket knife you can shave with, which you take care of and pass down to one of the grand-kids when they are old enough to appreciate it.

    But for most all of us the most used knife is our favorite blade stuck in a wooden block somewhere in the kitchen. Might be carbon, might be stainless. It's hard use includes cutting up and boning two or three chickens each week, peeling and dicing 10 pounds of spuds, two pounds of onions and a half dozen bell peppers. We know it is dull when it will not cleanly cut through the plastic wrapper on the breakfast sausage, so we hit it a lick on the diamond hone we keep in the top drawer by the sink. That takes about 10 seconds and we are good for another week.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  7. #7
    Senior Member DSJohnson's Avatar
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    Hey, I will have you know I have helped skin out 4 buffaloes! But i did not use either any "bushcraft" or "combat" or "tactical" blades doing it. I used good Sheffield steel all four times. An I Wilson blade that I treasure as a good side knife and great camp knife too.

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