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Thread: Old axe head

  1. #1

    Default Old axe head

    I got this old axe head today. 99EE3370-9D09-4CF3-A0F3-D6226E58DEA1.jpg


  2. #2
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Pretty cool. Any idea of the history?
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  3. #3

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    Unfortunately no. Uncle Melvin who flipped homes passed away about 10 years ago. It was found on one of his flips. The handle to head area was elliptical.

  4. #4

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    The cutting edge was a still sharp.

  5. #5
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    Man, when you said "old" you wasn't just woofin!

    Alan

  6. #6
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    It looks like an adze.

    Alan

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  8. #8
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    Well, then it's not an adze. In the first picture it looked like two separate pieces.

    Alan

  9. #9

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    Figured it out. It’s a turpentine box head axe. Makes sense for this area. 1800’s.

    https://www.worthpoint.com/worthoped...ead-1865443978

  10. #10
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    That's a really cool piece of History. Excellent find.

    Alan

  11. #11

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    Finding a couple “cat heads “ in the barn should have been a clue. He had all the other tools .

  12. #12
    Senior Member DSJohnson's Avatar
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    What is a "Cat head"?

  13. #13
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    It's a hammer that has surfaces on four sides. There are a lot of variations but the basics are the same with four surfaces. They are used in blacksmithing.

  14. #14
    Senior Member DSJohnson's Avatar
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    Thank you Rick

  15. #15

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    http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/extension/4h...s/catface.html we called them cat heads. They call them cat face.

  16. #16
    Senior Member DSJohnson's Avatar
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    Thanks Rebel. I love learning stuff. Never been around pine sap collection at all. Very interesting!

  17. #17
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Mea Culpa. I thought you were talking about this. These are called catheads as well.

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  18. #18

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    “Forbidden “ is all I get Rick. I’d like too see what you have.

  19. #19
    Senior Member DSJohnson's Avatar
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    it is a Farrier's tool, used by smiths who build horse shoes from bar stock. It is a"flattening" hammer, not much used by modern farriers who buy their shoes pre-made and hot fit them.

  20. #20
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    google foo cat's head hammer and you should get some hits. As I said, there were all sorts of configurations used my smittys but most had four surfaces on the head.

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