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Thread: Emergency Radios

  1. #1
    (FMR) Wilderness Guide pgvoutdoors's Avatar
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    Default Emergency Radios

    I've been reading through a few threads concerning emergency radios and decided to do a search. This listing seems to cover a lot of radios:

    http://www.calibex.com/emergency-rad...0--search-html
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Nice link. Thanks.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Thanks, PGV and a good subject. I would think before purchasing an emergency radio I might want to decide what bands and accessories I'm interested in as well as the type of power source. Whether I want the weather band vs. marine band or both, for example. Am I interested in short wave or just AM/FM. Then determine what accessories are important to you. Such as a light or the ability to charge other items. And you all know about the power sources.

    There are so many options when it comes to radios it's almost like comparing apples to oranges when you look at the price.
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    Loner Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    This one is expensive ($150), but all the reviews I saw said it was basically indestructible, and worked as advertised.
    American Red Cross FR1000 Voicelink Hand-Crank
    * 22 GMRS (General Mobile Radio System)/ FRS (Family Radio System) channels 2-Way Radio Feature with 121 privacy codes (38 CTCSS / 83 DCS)
    * AM/FM receiver
    * VOX (Voice operated transmission)
    * NOAA weather radio and NOAA weather alert
    * Built-in Siren and Flashlight
    * Cell Phone Charger
    http://www.etoncorp.com/product_card...uctDbId=344790

    From the Manufacturer "Eton Corporation"
    The American Red Cross FR-1000 Voicelink Radio is a battery or self-powered hand-crank radio that keeps you informed, even when the power is out. Tune into AM, FM and NOAA Weather Band frequencies for the most up-to-date information in case of an emergency. The FR-1000 Voicelink is more than just a radio though--it’s a multifunction powerhouse. The two-way walkie-talkie feature with GMRS technology lets you stay in touch with the outside world, while the cell phone charging jack ensures your access to available mobile phone networks. You also get a flashlight, a beacon light that can function as an SOS signal and a siren. And all of this can be powered with the twist of a crank.

    A Lifeline to Information
    Floods, fires, tornadoes, blizzards, and earthquakes--these are situations that nobody wants to find themselves in. The most critical resource during any emergency or natural disaster is information. Being able to make informed decisions and communicate with others is vital. The American Red Cross FR-1000 Voicelink Radio is built from the ground up to be a rugged, highly portable communication tool. It has an AM/FM tuner for news and public service announcements, as well as entertainment. The NOAA Weather Band radio receives weather broadcasts, warnings and other emergency messages. It can also be set to automatically activate on its own, informing you of any new alerts.

    The American Red Cross FR-1000 also ensures that your voice can be heard by others. The onboard two-way radio utilizes the GRMS/FRS bands, and is compatible with virtually every handheld radio and walkie-talkie on the market in America. It can be set to automatically scan through 22 channels and 121 privacy codes, allowing you to monitor or broadcast to those around you. Additionally, the VOX setting allows for convenient hands-free transmission. The FR-1000 can even keep you in touch with those who are farther away by charging cell phones via its on-board batteries or hand crank.

    The FR-1000 Makes Your Presence Known
    The American Red Cross FR-1000 offers multiple communication options, maximizing your ability to stay connected with others no matter the situation. During the day, a built-in siren can emit a continuous tone to announce your presence. Activate the bright red LED signal beacon and "SOS" is spelled out in Morse Code, perfect for long distance signaling at night. The FR-1000 also comes equipped with a flashlight, ensuring that you'll never be left in the dark.

    Redundant Power Sources for Always-On Reliability
    Having a device that sports multiple modes of communication means nothing if there is no way to power it, and the FR-1000 has been designed with that thought in mind. It can be powered via the included AC adapter and rechargeable battery pack, or by additional AA batteries. In the event that external power supplies are exhausted, the FR-1000 also employs a hand-operated dynamo. A few turns of its handle will bring light, news and information, no matter the situation.

    Product Description
    Self-Powered Hand-Crank AM/FM/NOAA Weather/ 2-Way GMRS Radio with Flashlight, Siren and Cell Phone Charger - Don't get caught in the dark! This self-powered hand-crank radio lets you stay informed, even when the power is out. Tune into AM, FM and weather band frequencies for the most up-to-date information in case of emergency. The Voicelink is more than just a radio?it's a multifunctional wonder. The two-way walkie-talkie feature with GMRS technology lets you stay in touch, as does the built-in cell phone charger. You also get a flashlight, a beacon light that can function as an SOS signal, and a siren. Power it all with the twist of a crank. You'll be prepared for any emergency, and there's an added benefit - Etón Corporation will contribute $1.50 of the sales price to support the American Red Cross. Plus each radio includes American Red Cross disaster preparedness tips!
    At home, on picnics, outings, road trips, and hikes - we all want enjoyment and the Eton Voicelink portable radio is there. Where the Voicelink really excels is during emergencies. Take it with you for home and away. It provides a light, a siren, emergency channel NOAA radio, AM and FM radio, clock and alarm. It can be powered when there's no power. Under unexpected, adverse conditions, you can rely on the Eton Voicelink to keep you connected. With its GMRS and FRS 2-Way radio feature, you can get in touch with others. Use the Voicelink for fun and for emergency survival. Can be powered from four different sources - Rechargeable Ni-MH battery - Dynamo hand crank alone - 4 AA batteries - AC Adapter (included) Cell-phone charging jack LCD display 12-hour (AM/PM) clock with Alarm clock function and SNOOZE function External speaker/microphone jack Unit Dimensions - 11.09? x 6.16? x 4.13? and 281.7mm x 156.5mm x 105.0mm (W x H x D) including handles/knobs; Weight - 2.17 lbs. and. 985 kg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Gray Wolf; 10-16-2008 at 09:44 PM.
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    Senior Member Tony uk's Avatar
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    Sounds like quite a piece of kit Grey Wolf,
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    (FMR) Wilderness Guide pgvoutdoors's Avatar
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    Gray Wolf - I've been looking at the Eton equipment, the FR1000 looks nice. Thanks!
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    (FMR) Wilderness Guide pgvoutdoors's Avatar
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    I have also owned a couple of hand-held's (amateur radios) that are in my safety kit when I'm guiding. The one is a very small duel-band broadcast w/ a wide range of receivable bands. It was made by Yaesu but no longer produce. I located the current version of it (VX-7R) on their web-site. www.yaesu.com
    http://www.yaesu.com/indexVS.cfm?cmd...5&isArchived=0
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    Loner Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    What I like about the Eton FR1000 mainly is:

    22 GMRS (General Mobile Radio System)/ FRS (Family Radio System) channels 2-Way Radio

    VOX (Voice operated transmission)

    A beacon light that can function as an SOS signal

    NOAA weather radio and NOAA weather alert

    AM/FM receiver

    Built-in Siren

    Cell Phone Charger

    Power it all with the twist of a crank, or batteries, or AC adapter.

    Basically indestructible, all buttons and crank are recessed, and the back has a wide protection bar.

    That's a lot of survival equipment options in one unit. Yes it's $150, but what are lives, or someones health worth??? This warranty, with ONE YEAR PARTS AND LABOR, It then should last at least 18 months, which makes the price about $8 a month, or $2 a week! JMHO
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    GW, that's a great way to break the cost down. I like that!
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  10. #10

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    I have a Garmin Wind-up radio. It has Short wave 1, 2, as well AM and FM. After winding it for a 2-3 minutes, it can hold its charge for about 15 minutes. I tried to find a picture of it online, but couldn't.

    I think it was like $30 or $40. It looks like a little box. Dimensions are about 5"x6". It's not waterproof, so I can't say it's perfect, but it does the job, I really like it.
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  11. #11

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    As far it is concerned to Radios, I might say to choose cls1110 Motorola two way Radio along with astonishing usage. It's cost is also very reasonable.

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    IC 7300 base
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    Call sign KO4HLR

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    Senior Member Michael aka Mac's Avatar
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    I have several Kaito Dynamo Solar Crank world radio with shortwave 1 &2 , NOAA weather radio and NOAA weather alert, Flashlight, and multi charger and accessory kit for multiple size plugs and USB. They also have not only rechargeable batteries built in but also you can add regular AA batteries too without having to take out the rechargeable ones. Have an Eton too somewhere in this place, if only I could remember wtf i did with it.

    Think i have like 4 of the Kaitos one is like 25 years old and still works, the others are 10 years more recent. Great reception, charges everything, crank dynamo works excellent too. Only down side, (this is with 20 year old one others will be same in 5-10 years) is that the rubberized coating gets tacky 15-20 years later, but other then sticky it is full operational.

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    Senior Member Old GI's Avatar
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    I think I have resolved the issue. I'm taking my HAM Technician test on Saturday. I have a Baofeng BF-F6HP that I'm preparing for service.
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    Senior Member Michael aka Mac's Avatar
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    I was happy to hear that the HAM Tech test no longer requires one to pass the Morse code section. cause i am only ... _ _ _ ... _ _ _ at it.

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