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Thread: Y’all reading about the TAPS act?

  1. #1
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Default Y’all reading about the TAPS act?

    I guess there’s a bill going before the Congress and Senate.


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    Hmmmm? On the surface it seems like the thing to do. Proactively look for and assess behavior/speech that appears to be a threat and intervene before a violent act takes place. What's not to like. As long as credible, moral and ethical men and women are running the program I don't see a problem..... except that humans will be implementing it.

    We really don't need a law to do the things the Act will provide for unless they plan on violating the 4th Amendment in the name of saving the children. Now I'm all for saving children... but no law will do that. We already have laws against killing children, or anyone else for that matter.

    What we need the law and the courts for is to take a genuine look at mental health and address the issue there.

    I don't have any experience with school shootings and I am very thankful for that. I do have some experience with Special Education (students with mental, emotional and psychotic disabilities fall into that group) and can speak with some degree of competence on the subject. There are some students who are genuinely disabled emotionally and psychologically. They are wired differently (in a negative way) and they should NEVER be allowed touch, much less own or possess a firearm. There are a good many students who go through school labeled as Emotionally Disturbed, they are on all kinds of drugs (prescribed) and low an behold, upon receiving their high school diploma and exiting the Special Ed umbrella, they are miraculously cured. By Golly I'd have given them the diploma on the first day of high school if I'd only known that was the cure. The real world has a way of sobering up those who are playing at abnormal. But, that other group is the real deal.

    So, is the TAPS ACT going to trump the HIPAA laws? Because about 100% of school shooters and other mass murderers went to school and those records are very private and though they are supposed to be kept, I 'd say there is about 1 school district in 1000 that actually knows where they are if they still have them, even going back ten years. The volume of paper produced in keeping all of a students records for 13 years of schooling is staggering, literally (you can't carry it). And no it's all paper, it's not digital.

    So who is going to look through all of that? What kind of humongous government bureaucracy is going to be formed to monitor the behavior, speech and thoughts 350,000,000 people?

    I'm afraid this is just another "feel good" "look, I'm doing something, and it's bi-partisan to boot!" attempt at getting elected again.

    That kid (or adult) who has his wires so crossed up that it shorts out the part of his brain that keeps him from killing people doesn't give a rat's patoot about a law or an Act or school rules or the Ten Commandments. Their little Id is amped up and they're going to get even or just get famous... That's all.

    Now, If they want to do away with the HIPAA laws, then I'm all for it. They're going to have to. Most school shooters are students or very recently so.

    There was a young lady at our school who ran with the anarchy crowd, very anti everything. She graduated and about a year later a young, all business US Army officer visited me asking about her character, behavior and such. I answered in a very general way until I asked him why he was inquiring. He said she had applied for a job that required National Security Clearance. I suppose my face told more than my tongue at that point because he asked what was wrong. I told him that I would have trouble sleeping at night knowing she had National Security Clearance. He closed his folder and left without further comment.

    There was no law that required him to ask, I did not violate HIPAA laws in my answer, but the end result was achieved.

    Children know, especially those who are a little edgy, that their criminal records are sealed until they are 18 then don't exist after that, and that their school records are sealed forever. There is basically no accountability for off color behavior or mental illness.

    Do away with HIPAA if these politicians want to pass some laws. But that won't get them re-elected. Hold children AND their parents accountable for misbehavior. Give principals and SpEd directors the leeway to report incorrigible or psychotic behavior to the authorities and hold those individuals accountable in regards to THEIR access to firearms and leave mine alone.

    Alan

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I didn't see any money allocated for the crystal ball they are going to use to identify who the shooter (driver, bomber, whatever) is going to be. Do we run rough shod over the 1st Amendment. If someone says something they don't like is he on the threat list? How many danged laws do we need to regulate our lives? If someone makes a bomb threat today they have the power to arrest him. What's this going to do the present law won't?

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    I think that there are some things that can be done to stop some killings, like perhaps entering the names of violent offenders in the NICS database so they can't buy guns and kill people in churches and identify incorrigible teenagers who have violent tendencies and multiple run ins with the police and downright crazy bas**ds who kill their mothers, steal her guns and kill six year olds.

    I think spotting those few would go a long way toward preventing mass shootings.

    Alan

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    I predict ..... if we kept violent offenders IN jail instead of letting them out on the street to re-offend... I predict ..... If we gave kids a choice, military or jail time... I predict ..... If we draft football players that refuse to stand for the national anthem into the military... I predict ..... I we allow prayer .... anywhere. I predict....if we do away with gun free zones.... The course of this country just might turn back to what it used to be and we wouldn't need laws to predict who would be the next serial killer.

    Tell us again, grandpa what common sense was before it became extinct...

  7. #7

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    Yikes! So instead of having the world's most professional army we'll have one composed of our worst criminals?! That doesn't seem like a great idea. As for the anthem, we should have a law forcing folks to stand. After all it's worked great for Iran, Germany, the Soviet Union, etc. We don't need that pesky liberty.

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    No, Phaedrus. It never worked that way. You young whipper snappers. World War II was filled with kids that were given that choice, so was Korea and Viet Nam. Why we stopped it, I have no idea. Young men having committed some stupid crime like car theft were given the option, not serial killers. Of course, if you already had a record, that wasn't an option unless there was a war on. Here's a read straight from 1942 for you.

    https://blogs.shu.edu/ww2-0/1942/05/...he-war-effort/

  9. #9
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Common sense? Where? What I’m seeing, like drag queen story hour and these bills are wrong .
    Last edited by rebel; 07-04-2019 at 09:58 AM.

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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    When I was young and the "draft" was still a thing, our county courts had a Marine recruiting officer in residence.

    You steal a car on a first offense no probation, no slap on the wrist, get out of jail free because you are a precious soul mistreated by society. You got the choice, two years hard labor or two years in the Corps.

    I had several friends that had their father bail them out of jail and take them directly to the recruiting station, they were put on a bus immediately and in boot camp somewhere by dark. When their case came up in the courtroom the judge would dismiss the charges, shake the hand of the father, and proceed with his day.

    I was a young platoon leaders back then and I knew that most of my infantry platoon was made up of these characters. They made good soldiers in an atmosphere of bonding and strict expectations. that is why "military discipline" and civilian expectations are so different. Military discipline revolves around forming new thought processes and reshaping character.

    I never remember asking anyone how they got there, they were just there. They did their job or they didn't.

    The real kicker was that most of these guys were listed as "volunteers" rather than draftees, and that does make a difference. The DI has a list of his people. They are separated but not by race, ethnicity, religion, or income, they are listed as V=vollunteers, NG=national guard (also known then as "naked geese", and D= draftees. As volunteers they had best shot at advancement and job picks. Most would make PFC by the end of boot and be trained in some specialty area after AIT. Many of them went on to become professional NCO material, the guys that actually run the nitty-gritty of the military.

    By the end of training most had forgotten why they were there and the bad decision making process was in rapid change. They were not the same person they had been when standing in that courtroom with a smirk on their faces.

    It took a long time to sort out the system for the new volunteer army we have now. Things were grim in the late '70s and all through the '80s. After the first Gulf War they got things worked out with use of the Guard and Reserve forces as a ready reserve as they were intended to be.

    Now the pay is so good and the standards so high that half the young people in the nation do not qualify for military service. With a HS diploma being a requirement, and only 2/3 of the young people getting one of those rolls of paper in this age, you can see where there might be a shortage of manpower.

    The real pity is that we have deprived our society of the greatest social leveling and personal redemption agent known to man, mandatory military service.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  11. #11
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    It’ll all work out one way or another. Nature doesn’t like a void. Back in 58/59 Mao said the sparrows were eating too much grain so a national program was established to kill the sparrows. They did a pretty good job. Unfortunately for them, the sparrows also ate locusts. The locusts came and 45 million people died of starvation. We like being free and have been for awhile.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    When I was young and the "draft" was still a thing, our county courts had a Marine recruiting officer in residence.

    You steal a car on a first offense no probation, no slap on the wrist, get out of jail free because you are a precious soul mistreated by society. You got the choice, two years hard labor or two years in the Corps.

    I had several friends that had their father bail them out of jail and take them directly to the recruiting station, they were put on a bus immediately and in boot camp somewhere by dark. When their case came up in the courtroom the judge would dismiss the charges, shake the hand of the father, and proceed with his day.

    I was a young platoon leaders back then and I knew that most of my infantry platoon was made up of these characters. They made good soldiers in an atmosphere of bonding and strict expectations. that is why "military discipline" and civilian expectations are so different. Military discipline revolves around forming new thought processes and reshaping character.

    I never remember asking anyone how they got there, they were just there. They did their job or they didn't.

    The real kicker was that most of these guys were listed as "volunteers" rather than draftees, and that does make a difference. The DI has a list of his people. They are separated but not by race, ethnicity, religion, or income, they are listed as V=vollunteers, NG=national guard (also known then as "naked geese", and D= draftees. As volunteers they had best shot at advancement and job picks. Most would make PFC by the end of boot and be trained in some specialty area after AIT. Many of them went on to become professional NCO material, the guys that actually run the nitty-gritty of the military.

    By the end of training most had forgotten why they were there and the bad decision making process was in rapid change. They were not the same person they had been when standing in that courtroom with a smirk on their faces.

    It took a long time to sort out the system for the new volunteer army we have now. Things were grim in the late '70s and all through the '80s. After the first Gulf War they got things worked out with use of the Guard and Reserve forces as a ready reserve as they were intended to be.

    Now the pay is so good and the standards so high that half the young people in the nation do not qualify for military service. With a HS diploma being a requirement, and only 2/3 of the young people getting one of those rolls of paper in this age, you can see where there might be a shortage of manpower.

    The real pity is that we have deprived our society of the greatest social leveling and personal redemption agent known to man, mandatory military service.
    This post is why we need a "LIKE" button.

    Alan

  13. #13
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    You got one! Click on that little "sheriff's" badge in the green bar at the bottom of his post.

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