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Thread: ID small leafy sprouts

  1. #1

    Default ID small leafy sprouts

    Found these in the yard they look edible and I nibbled a tiny bit to test for a reaction and no negative reactions. They seem maybe they have some silicates in the leaves but tasted pretty good. I know these kind of small greens can be very tough to ID with out flowers or other IDable structures, but maybe someone is familiar with the growing habit and young leaf structure/arrangement. Thanks guys.
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  2. #2
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Alex - I'm going to guess by your IP that the plants in question are in Colorado. I wonder if that is a chickweed or in that family? If you take it to your county extension office this should be able to identify it for you.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Staten Island I believe.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Staten Island, Colorado. Tomato, tomahto. By the way, never put anything in your mouth you are not 100% sure of. Some stuff like Amanita ocreata are really really unforgiving.

  5. #5

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    That could be anything from Lobelia to lettuce, though it kinda looks like the mache in my garden - but don't bet on it enough to put it in your mouth.
    Let it grow out a bit before eating more of it.
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  6. #6

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    Will do, thanks for all the input everyone. I'll keep an eye on it and try to ID it again when it's more mature.

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  7. #7

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    I remember a "survival" class at a 6th-grade camp I went to. The guy who taught it, who looked like a young Mark Twain, btw, gave advice on eating wild plants.

    1. Take a tiny pinch. If it burns your tongue, spit it out, and move on.
    2. If it doesn't burn, chew and swallow only the tiny pinch. Wait 24 hours.
    3. If you aren't ill after 24 hours, take a bite, chew, and swallow. Wait another 24 hours.
    4. If you still aren't ill after 24 hours, it should be okay.

    Of course, this is if you're lost. Even then, you don't really need food immediately anyway, so you might be better off just waiting.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    The universal edibility test. As I understand it, the test was devised for use by downed pilots in foreign lands not for those of us that have no clue what "that stuff" is that is growing outside our back door. There are some things that are not forgiving.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    The universal edibility test. As I understand it, the test was devised for use by downed pilots in foreign lands not for those of us that have no clue what "that stuff" is that is growing outside our back door. There are some things that are not forgiving.
    Oh, yeah. I wasn't suggesting doing that in this case. Just trying to impress everyone with my vast store of knowledge.

    On things not being forgiving, it would be a bummer to try that on something that ended up being similar to poison ivy. And there are some things that pack a poison punch. I read somewhere that it takes something like 1/300,000 of a gram of poison from the Arrow Poison frog to kill you. There may be plants with that strength of stuff, too. A good reason to avoid the Amazon jungle, and just watch it on the Discovery channel.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

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