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Thread: What are You Reading These Days

  1. #41
    Senior Member WolfVanZandt's Avatar
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    Clinical Medicine for Nurses by Paul Ringer and Little Women by Louisa Alcott. I enjoy period pieces because we might not be too far from regressing to one of those periods How did people live? I'm on medicines for heart disease and two of my housemates are diabetic. That poses an interesting puzzle for survival. What do we do when we can no longer get prescription medications?
    True enough, my final home is still out there, but this is most certainly my home range and I love it. I love every rock I fall off and tree I trip over. Even when I am close to dying from exhaustion, a beautiful sunset doesn't lose it's power to refresh and inspire me and that, in itself, is enough to save me sometimes.


  2. #42

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    Now I read Schopenhauer Metaphysics of sexual love.

  3. #43

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    I've been in the woods for a few months and have been prompted to ask a question or post something. So.

    I bought a few copies of Horace Kephart's biographical book, "Back of Beyond" by George Ellison and Janet McCue. I went to a book signing and got both authors to sign the books. Kep was incredibly interesting character. A great read.

  4. #44
    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    My daughter is reading "One Second After" by William R. Forstchen a post Apocalyptic tale that has America sent back to the dark ages after losing a war because of an EMP attack. She is on the second book," One Year After" and wanting me to read the first.

    I am currently reading "Last Of The Breed" by Louis L'Amour A book Steve wanted me to read, he had read and re-read it many times. the story of a USAF pilot who survived being downed in a experimental air craft in Russia, escaping a Soviet prison camp, and being chased across the frozen Siberian wilderness and the Bearing strait, across the sea to America being followed by one of Siberia by one of their best trackers who knows the area well, the pilot is a Sioux who uses his Native American skills to survive the rough conditions and stay ahead of the tracker.
    Soular powered by the son.

    Nell, MLT (ASCP)

  5. #45
    Senior Member WolfVanZandt's Avatar
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    Last of a Breed was different for L'Amour and, in my opinion, one of his best works. I was pleasantly surprised.

    All of my reading is project oriented now so it's nothing spectacular. I was alternating between the Life of Johnson (long with a few interesting spots - Sam Johnson didn't like America much. He wrote a lot, including a dictionary. He was opinionated and ranged from okay to obnoxious. It might have just been the times. Boswell liked him.) and The Dresden Files (eh - entertaining but not anything to really recommend), and then I needed to write a chapter on rhetoric so my reading has been superseded by that. If you just hafta read a book on rhetoric, I can recommend Bending Opinions, by Ton van Haaften, et al.
    True enough, my final home is still out there, but this is most certainly my home range and I love it. I love every rock I fall off and tree I trip over. Even when I am close to dying from exhaustion, a beautiful sunset doesn't lose it's power to refresh and inspire me and that, in itself, is enough to save me sometimes.

  6. #46

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    Military Memoirs of a Confederate by Gen. E P Alexander
    Wilderness Survival:
    Surviving a temporary situation where you're lost in the wilderness

  7. #47

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    I have been reading through Skills of a Blacksmith Volume I by Mark Aspery. Iím having an absolute blast hand forging small tools like cabinet handles, coat hangers, and of course, door hinges that donít properly fit! It can be a bit frustrating at times, as Iím learning almost entirely from books and online sources, but itís so much fun.

    It was cheaper than I imagined too. I got started with a hole in the ground style forge. My design was even simpler than the one in the video, I just stuck a straight black pipe into a hole, I didnít bother with the bricks or the pipe bend. Once my forge was taking care of, I got a hold of a v-bit blacksmith tong and a 20 year old carpenters hammer and I was off to the races.

    I've been rambling, I got too excited! But if this at all seems interesting to you, you should check out Black Bear Forge or TorbjŲrn Ňhman. If you donít necessarily care to learn for yourself, but just want to check out cool cinematic shots of forging, I also recommend Alec Steelís yt channel.

    But back to reading, I also recently finished the book The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood as I have been interested in the flood of data and information that surrounds us these days. The book was ...a bit of a let down honestly. It was far too vague in spots where it really needed to get specific.

    And of course, I have a knee high stack of books next to my night stand that I will get around to reading ...one day...eventually..

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