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Thread: Water Purification Filters

  1. #21
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    I drink a lot of water. My back packing days may come back some day, but for now I can carry all the water I need. Day hikes I carry a few bottles with a filter as a back up.
    That's kinda my plan...these days....used to carry only the tablets...actually still do...(wonder if they are still ok?)

    Used the lifestraw filter a few of times....should have tried it at home first...first few sips were kinda nasty......kinda hard to get enough for a cup of coffee

    The Kadyn pump water filter is in the trucks BOB....

    Some times I wish the SHTF would just show up and get it over with......doing everything over and over get old....(just kidding)
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  2. #22
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    I always use the water filter when I'm out in the woods (better safe than sorry). I have this for more than a year - Katadyn Hiker Pro and it's just great. I highly recommend it.

  3. #23
    Senior Member DSJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Some times I wish the SHTF would just show up and get it over with......doing everything over and over get old....(just kidding)
    I will not lie, I have had the same thought.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Antonyraison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    I have never found boiling to be anything but a last resort.

    Unless you are planning for boiling most hikers/campers will not have a container large enough to boil enough water for proper hydration. A little 2 quart pot, canteen cup or the 1 liter pot from the backpacking cook set is not going to do the job.

    I used to carry at least 4 liters of water while long distance hiking and toting a one gallon cook-pot hanging from the pack is past most people's tolerance levels. Add to that the need to carry extra fuel in areas where fires can not be built and the choice becomes carry a filter, or carry more than the filter's weight in fuel.

    Add to that the fact that most people are not inclined to stop, build a fire and boil water at every canteen fill up during the day and you have the recipe for water born illness due to someone running short and getting dehydrated, coming across water that looks ok but is not, drinking it raw due to being in a hurry, and getting sick.
    100% yeah you need a billy can or a pot or canteen cup, larger is better.. Generally yes is last resort, but is how we generally required to do it on on excursions, when we hike we use water drops and take from clear running creaks.. (not really the most ideal, generally last ditch) but is how we train here in SA Minimal equipment... Also made filters from discarded bottles, charcoal, stones grass etc.. Also works... but I still boil it also.
    Last edited by Antonyraison; 05-09-2018 at 04:59 AM.
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    Not so much any more, but in the past we had a lot of "Hikers" down here in South Texas. Some of those guys (the ones who knew where they were going) could hike about 50 miles a day. Every one of them had a gallon jug, or a big coke bottle on a string, or some kind of container used as a canteen. They were cheap (free) and could be discarded if the hiker had to hike real fast to stay ahead of the "Hiker Patrol". Those guys had zero food, and took water from windmills, water troughs and cisterns. It wasn't always the cleanest and the didn't have filters (except their internal ones).

    Unless you can draw water straight off the standpipe, the water from ranch cisterns and troughs is a protozoa paradise. We were about 70 miles, as the crow flies (or as the hiker hikes) from the river. Some guys could make it in two days easy, others a week. The more experienced could make it to clean water in pretty good shape. We'd feed them, work the ones who wanted to stay, and send them on their way. The ones who took a week to get there were usually pretty sick by the time they pulled up. There's no doctor to call so they could bunk out in the barn until their scours stopped and they got a little strength back.

    The reason I bring all this up is two fold. #1. Even someone who has been used to drinking less than potable water all their lives can get deathly sick drinking water that looks good. And 2. There are still people in this world who can cover 35-50 miles a day on foot through rough brush if they know where the safe water is and do not succumb to the temptation to drink anything questionable.

    Oh, and always drink up stream from the horses.

    Alan

  6. #26
    Senior Member Antonyraison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan R McDaniel Jr View Post
    Not so much any more, but in the past we had a lot of "Hikers" down here in South Texas. Some of those guys (the ones who knew where they were going) could hike about 50 miles a day. Every one of them had a gallon jug, or a big coke bottle on a string, or some kind of container used as a canteen. They were cheap (free) and could be discarded if the hiker had to hike real fast to stay ahead of the "Hiker Patrol". Those guys had zero food, and took water from windmills, water troughs and cisterns. It wasn't always the cleanest and the didn't have filters (except their internal ones).

    Unless you can draw water straight off the standpipe, the water from ranch cisterns and troughs is a protozoa paradise. We were about 70 miles, as the crow flies (or as the hiker hikes) from the river. Some guys could make it in two days easy, others a week. The more experienced could make it to clean water in pretty good shape. We'd feed them, work the ones who wanted to stay, and send them on their way. The ones who took a week to get there were usually pretty sick by the time they pulled up. There's no doctor to call so they could bunk out in the barn until their scours stopped and they got a little strength back.

    The reason I bring all this up is two fold. #1. Even someone who has been used to drinking less than potable water all their lives can get deathly sick drinking water that looks good. And 2. There are still people in this world who can cover 35-50 miles a day on foot through rough brush if they know where the safe water is and do not succumb to the temptation to drink anything questionable.

    Oh, and always drink up stream from the horses.

    Alan
    Agreed you must always treat any wild water as unsafe and do you best to Filter and boil and make as safe as you can to drink
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  7. #27
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    I'll bet your barn smelled better when just the horses were there than when the scours hit. Pee U.

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    I see what you did there.
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  9. #29
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    My barn couldn't smell. It was a barn. At times it had a definite stench (that's polite for stink, as in stink, stank, stunk)....


    Once I had two exchange students show up one evening. I fed them and showed them the room in the barn. They were over joyed to see that they had an entire 12x12 room with mattresses all to themselves. Next morning they said they wanted to stay and work, $5/day and meals.... There was plenty that needed to be done so we had a deal. First order of business was to dig a latrine. When it was finished I set an old lawn chair over it that had a hole in the seat and put toilet paper in a coffee can next to it. We went on and worked that day. My grandmother and great grandmother lived in the house where the barn was. I lived down the road. Next morning only one of them was waiting for me to go to work. I figured the other was on his way. I look up and he's coming out of the brush line about 200 yards behind the house. I asked the guy standing there what the other one was doing. He said he went to take a dump. I asked him what the hell he thought the big hole he dug yesterday was for? "Por elllas" he said pointing at the house. I told him, "No, my grandmother and great grandmother were not going to use the latrine, no matter how nice it was.... That it was for them"...

    This would not be my last exasperation with third world culture. But, I will tell you that both of those guys weren't 5'3" and 125# soaking wet and they nearly worked me to death. They didn't know anything about clocks. The sun came up, start working. The sun goes down, stop working.

    All this hubbub with the immigrants of today doesn't hold water to any of those guys back then. Anyone who will walk through the brush into another country to work harder and longer than ANYONE in this country has my total respect. At that time $5/day (and food) was about 10 times what they could make at home, if they could find someone with money to work for.

    Over time though, things change, and that changed for the worse.

    There are still those who will work hard, but they don't really want to stay here. They want to work and go home. The ones who want to stay here are mostly those who don't want to work but want our government's handouts.

    Alan

  10. #30
    Junior Member Fatizi's Avatar
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    I have used the following:

    Tincture of iodine........brilliantly effective but has a slight taste, and shouldn't be used for long periods (your body has a limit as to how much iodine it should ingest in a lifetime).

    Puritabs..........very good, but not 100% effective apparently (I've never had a problem).

    Portable hand-pumped ceramic water filter with charcoal......you can drink camel pee after 30 seconds of pumping this little pump. It is brilliant, but hard work, and the ceramic cartdriges are expensive and fragile.

    Due to overdosing on the first, I now stick to the latter 2 methods......and in all my years of travelling, all over the world, I have never had the trots or any upset stomach. You need the kit, and you need discipline.

  11. #31

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    Boiling water in an onsite made bamboo container. With palm string. This was on a Pot and Machete Challenge in FL.

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  12. #32
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    We're not gonna ask you to clarify the "pot" statement. Not gonna do it. Nope.

  13. #33

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    The cookies didn't last long.

  14. #34

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    Don't want to post a new thread, so let me ask you guys here: water purification fillter or water purification tablets? Which one is better, what do you think?

  15. #35
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidgoldberg View Post
    Don't want to post a new thread, so let me ask you guys here: water purification fillter or water purification tablets? Which one is better, what do you think?
    You did not go back and read the entire thread did you?

    Some like boiling, some like tablets, some like drops, others like filters.

    For long term use in the woods filters have the lead due to the amount of water they will process. That bottle of pills only has 20-30 tablets, the drops might give you 15 gallons of water.

    The Lifestraw and the Sawyer will filter one year or more of daily drinking water. If you factor the cost alone the filters will save you a fortune if you are needing to purify on a regular basis.

    I figure that the one I bought will last me the rest of my life in the woods. BTW I have a close friend in the mid-east on a mission effort who is sucking all his drinking water through a Sawyer right now. He spends 3-6 months each year in desolate locations and has carried the Sawyer on each trip since I gifted him his first one about 5 years ago. Before the Sawyer he was sick on his trips constantly, even though he only drank bottled water. It seems that some foreign suppliers simply put tap water in the bottles.
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  16. #36
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madmax View Post
    Kyratshooter makes a good point about boiling. You need a bigger pot than usual and factor in cooling the water. A lesson learned on our first Pot and Machete.
    After boiling - put the pot back in the stream - cools fast.
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