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Thread: What's with the Gerber-hate?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Gerber Legendary Blades is a maker of consumer knives and multitools headquartered in Tigard, Oregon, United States, within the Portland metropolitan area. Currently Gerber is a sub-division of Fiskars Brands Inc, owned by the Fiskars company of Finland

    Reasons I dislike Gerber:
    -They don't readily disclose what grades of steel they use in their blades ("high carbon stainless steel" is meaningless)
    -The Gerber knives I've encountered had QC issues (vertical and lateral blade play, sharp handle edges)
    -None that I've encountered came acceptably sharp out-of-box
    -Their designs seem uninspired to me, as if they are "pitching to the middle" of the market (to non-afis) - For multi tool I love Leatherman (the competition) I like Fiskars, so I own the compact mini axe and blade. I think the problem stems from folks wanting something cheap to do the job and clearly you get what you pay for.Honest I think Benchmade and others are better.


    FYI - they are made in Oregon.
    Last edited by Wise Old Owl; 11-06-2017 at 12:48 AM.
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  2. #22
    Senior Member Antonyraison's Avatar
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    I have only one big name brand that I am able to really get my hand on the rest is out of my price range..
    Kabar is good
    If I could afford it I would buy tops, like a silent hero or such (cause I know why its designed and by whom, certainly made for harsh africa)
    And I would certainly consider some cold steel.. like the srk in 3v.. but wow geeze they very pricey..
    but BG over here for a whatever steel and poor qc.. I can get hand made custom knives from top makers in Southern africa at the same price point in Rands.. so I would not even buy bg..
    A lot of "china mall" knives are even better than BG.. I have a fallkniven Chinese clone out of mov13 and that even beats a bg at a quarter of price.
    only Gerbers I would get are likely older rarer ones
    as far as mulitools.. i agree leatherman is the way to go.. i just don't find much use for them in the bush, other than the small saw
    Last edited by Antonyraison; 11-06-2017 at 03:01 AM.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I guess Hajua is correct after all, there is some Gerber dislike out there.

    Probably the same for any brand one would point toward.

    I think I will jut go out to the shop and put a new handle on the Old Forge butcher knife I found in the box last night. I forgot it was there.

    Anyone here ever been to a real family style "hog killing" and seen the knives they use to butcher out 20 or 25 hogs on a cold crisp morning about this time of year?

    Mostly Old Forge, Old Hickory and Chicago Cutlery.
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  4. #24
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    I had two that I used. One Old Hickory and one Chicago Cutlery. I never scraped my hogs, I skinned them. Most in one day was 8, by myself, no family at that time to help. I helped an old couple with theirs though. They would just raise one hog a year and it was a monster every year. They were the type that used everything but the hair. The old man would lay the hog on a ramp and drape burlap sacks from boiling water over them, pour some boiling water, let it sit while more was boiling and start scraping. He used a butcher knife about 14 inches long to scrape the hair. After we got it clean he'd start carving off strips of skin and lard and tossing it in the big rendering pot. After all the fat was trimmed then he'd start taking out cuts of meat. Finally the head and innards were left. the head came off and sat on the kitchen counter until the old lady could get to it. It was shaved of course. The head and feet were her domain. We'd pour the cooled lard into clean buckets and seal the lids. That lard would last the year for making tortillas. The boiled bones would become tamales gordos and all of the innards were used for something. Some of it I ate, some of it I didn't. Even the blood was collected when the hog was killed. He killed it with a 22 lr at the base of the skull severing the spine. The hog would go straight down still breathing and heart still pumping. We would drag the hind end of the hog up the ramp and he would make a small cut with that long knife under the hogs jaw bone and the old lady would stoop over there collecting all the blood in a big tub.

    I should have learned more from him but I would help him with the heavy stuff and go on about my business. I should have made learning that stuff my business.

    I always shot my hogs in the forehead and strung them up under the windmill. My goal was to finish as soon as I could, get the sausage made and the quarters sold in town. I sure was in a hurry back then....

    Alan

  5. #25
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    Oh, but, No, I'v never been to a real hog killin. I wish I had been. I'll bet it was a lot of fun. Work, but fun work.

    Alan

  6. #26
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    They can get exciting!

    Last one I was at Uncle Wesley climbed up on the side of the pickup to shoot a hog. He had been nipping at the bottle a little and leaned over with the .22 and yelled back "Which one of these hogs do you want me to shoot?"

    Dad looked at me real strange and announced there was only one hog in the truck.

    Uncle Wess shot a hole right through the new floor of the pickup trying to get the one on the left.

    It would take us about 36 hours to get everything finished up, all the sausage sacked and the meat chilled and salted.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  7. #27
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I always shot my hogs in the forehead and strung them up under the windmill.
    I would think that the folks at the miniature golf course would have objected.
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  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    They can get exciting!

    Last one I was at Uncle Wesley climbed up on the side of the pickup to shoot a hog. He had been nipping at the bottle a little and leaned over with the .22 and yelled back "Which one of these hogs do you want me to shoot?"

    Dad looked at me real strange and announced there was only one hog in the truck.

    Uncle Wess shot a hole right through the new floor of the pickup trying to get the one on the left.

    It would take us about 36 hours to get everything finished up, all the sausage sacked and the meat chilled and salted.
    You have the best stories.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  9. #29
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLeePettimore View Post
    You have the best stories.
    What can I say?

    I am closing in on 68 years and have all the stories saved up from those experiences of camping and woodcraft from the time I was an infant.

    I taught school for 35 years and had to deal with 200 teenagers and their parents on a daily basis and the crazy admins for all that time. That will give you one source of good tails.

    Then I was married three times; two good women, which I buried, and one that was bat $h!& crazy. That is another 50 years of tails due to those experiences and the fact that they were southern girls and had all the family traipsing of the region.

    (Imagine being married to a woman with 5 brothers who took up half the room on the FBI 10 most wanted list and had names like Big Bob, Buster, Curly, Bones, and Poob. Most of the family could not remember what their real names were. Their oldest known ancestor had been ordered shot by George Washington, for treason, and their most famous ancestor had his head pop off when he was hung for stealing a pie.)

    Then there was my own family, which was unique to say the least, but in a very calm and sedate way.

    There are some good stories in there!
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  10. #30
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Yeah, bring to mind many stories.....
    Most start with:

    When I was a kid.....
    There we were...
    THere was a time....
    There he was up on the ridge....
    It was a dark and stormy night......
    Some day we are gonna laugh....

    Some stories are better if you were there...
    Last edited by hunter63; 11-09-2017 at 01:48 PM.
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  11. #31
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Yep, some stories are better in the moment.

    Telling about your little brother falling into a tank filled with liquid cow crap 60 years after the fact and watching it happen, almost in slow motion, on the spot has no comparison.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    I would think that the folks at the miniature golf course would have objected.
    Nah, I'd just let them play through.

    Alan

  13. #33
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    He did it once at the swimming pool. Great idea but boy was that a mess. Clogged the filters. Turned the pool red. Kids covered in blood. Mom's P.O.'d. Yeah, pretty ugly.

  14. #34
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    He did it once at the swimming pool. Great idea but boy was that a mess. Clogged the filters. Turned the pool red. Kids covered in blood. Mom's P.O.'d. Yeah, pretty ugly.
    I heard the same story - but a different version hog urine turned the pool blue... there was this guy in a goalie mask.... nevermind.
    "Never work against mother nature"--Caesar Milan.

  15. #35
    Not a Mod finallyME's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLeePettimore View Post
    You have the best stories.
    Don't get him started....please!
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