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Thread: Restoring rusty wood stove - advice

  1. #21
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    JL if you paint that stove make sure you paint it outside and then build a honking big fire in it and burn the chemicals off before you take the stove inside. It is not just unpleasant, it is unhealthy and the fumes are enough to clear a slum of bedbugs.

    I painted one inside one time, fired it up and had to leave the house for a couple of days. I was not a popular person for a while after that.

    And regarding the big coffee pot, just a word of warning. If you decide to make coffee in that thing for the group then brew the coffee the night before the meeting and put the pot on the stove to warm it up next morning. 32-36 cups of water takes about a hour and a half to come to a boil on a wood stove!
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.


  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Hey ...go for it..... it is a worthy project.
    .....pic's are not not showing up for me.
    They stopped showing for me, too.

    I edited, and fixed them, sort of.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  3. #23
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I've been using the same enameled coffee pot for about ten years. I've never had issues with it. It sits over open fires many, many times each and every year.
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  4. #24
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    I've been using the same enameled coffee pot for about ten years. I've never had issues with it. It sits over open fires many, many times each and every year.
    Same here. I have three or four of the smaller 2qt pots and they get abused to no end. Most are coated with a thick layer of campfire soot so I am not really sure if they have any enamel left on them.

    Enameling was developed for use directly on the fire or on the wood stove first in the late 1700s and refined for cheap mass production in the 1870s. Cooking over a fire was its main purpose.

    It chips and flakes off when dented but does a good economical job of protecting metal that is repeatedly heated and cooled from the rust that plagues that type use.

    I am not one of those folks that enjoys seeing titanium and stainless on my campfire. Copper-ware and enamel-ware are just fine for my use, even if they do dent and flake some.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    Don't get that tincloth too close to the hot stove, you will melt and start leaking!
    Well, I haven't made the tin pants yet (regardless of what I said on the Tin Cloth Recipe thread back in May).

    I am gearing up for it though, since they are a winter clothing item.

    BTW, I was just reading through the whole thread, and I read about you making a tin coat. In looking up Carhartt coats, all of the ones I saw have some sort of lining. How does the treatment effect the lining?
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  6. #26
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    This yuppie grade Banana Republic chore coat I used has a lining of fleece and I can not tell it has suffered any damage from being soaked with the solution.

    It now has about a year of occasional use on it and has lost it's smell but still sheds water like a duck. It has become my go-to raincoat.

    I am pretty sure you could snag a pair of cargo pants from the Gap and treat them with that solution and turn them into body armor.

    Might want to try a pair from the thrift store first.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  7. #27

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    Nothing beats an actual test. I'll keep an eye out for a Carhartt-type lined coat when I go to garage sales.

    I suppose I could just stick some lining-type material into the legs of the pants when I treat them and see what happens.

    Thanks for the advice. It's actually helpful for my thought process to read and respond. It's always better, though, if I think before I click the Reply button.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  8. #28

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    Here's an update on the stove:

    20171014_142810.jpg
    20171014_142827.jpg
    20171014_142858.jpg
    20171014_142930.jpg

    It's actually blacker than it looks in the pictures. It looks like I got the front shelf a little dirty, too.

    I tried putting a gasket on the door, but I think I got one that was too thick. I may not put one on. It's not intended to stay lit all night, so I'm not that worried about it being air-tight.

    It only has one coat of paint. D'ya think I should put on another, or just save the can for touch ups?
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  9. #29
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Nice job....Lots of work......
    And if you have any paint left....you can do mine...
    I feel bad now....LOL

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    My pic's are not coming out very good????
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  10. #30

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    That's exactly what we've been on the hunt for for our cabin. Nice job.

  11. #31
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    It looks brand new. Nice job.

  12. #32

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    Thanks, all.

    Now if it would just cool off here, maybe I can try it out.

    Oh yeah, still have to "season" it. Still, best to wait for cool weather for that, too. And getting up on the roof to install the pipe.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  13. #33

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    Installed, and seasoned (mostly) on Friday. Used on Saturday with my Men's group. Works great!

    thumbnail.jpg

    c.jpg

    b.jpg
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  14. #34
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Nice! I like making things work again.

  15. #35
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Nice job....Looks warm.
    Was looking at my chimney....I need to get up by the thimble thru the wall and check it.....

    Picked up a section of pipe and a 90 degree fitting....JIC.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
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  16. #36
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Excellent! It looks like it turned out great.
    Can't Means Won't

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