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Thread: Self defense against a dog attack?

  1. #21
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Kind of tired of the low iq lynching mentality. Does legality make something right? My dogs could come running at you. Because of their size and speed you would be afraid. Your son could be driving a car and not paying attention. Statistically who's more likely to cause harm? Do you shoot the kid? No.
    Last edited by rebel; 09-17-2017 at 10:14 PM.


  2. #22
    Senior Member Antonyraison's Avatar
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    I get your point, and I am an advocate for animals and dogs,etc.
    And find 99% of the issue is not the dog at all, its the owner of the dog.
    Yet one could find oneself in the back woods faced with a rabbid dog and you have yourself and your family and your well behaved dog to protect.
    the choice is simple...
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  3. #23
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    I agree. A buddy of mine was hiking alone and had an encounter with a pack. Now he hikes armed.

  4. #24
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Back in the early 1980s I built a homestead in a place that was really rough woods country with miles of gravel road access. It was a good run from town and ASPCA and rescue groups did not abound back then. The custom of the people in town was to bring unwanted litters of pups and kittens out to the country and drop them in the woods.

    Most of the dropped litters starved but some of the very strong survived so the woods was inhabited by packs of wild and savage dogs that had no human fear and killed anything they came across, sometimes for "sport".

    On one occasion I remember grabbing my binoculars to see why a horse was trotting across my pasture, since I did not own a horse. I got the glasses focused to discover I was watching a huge great dane type critter lope across the field. No one in the area owned a GD.

    I encountered a pack my second week on the property, and fortunately had a firearm with me but still barely made it back to the safety of my truck without being mauled.

    I immediately switched from revolver to semi-auto with extra magazines on the belt for my primary belt gun and started carrying a Browning A5 in the truck.

    It was not but a short time latter that one of the neighbors was mauled in his yard by one of the packs and had to under go intensive surgery to get repaired, as well as the full rabies treatment.

    The entire community went dog hunting crazy. We hunted them like people hunt coyotes today, except we did not have some of the fancy electronic predator calls. I probably killed a pickup truck load of wild dogs over the course of the 5 years I was on that place. Others killed more than I did.

    Everyone had a 30-30, M1 carbine, or a magazine fed shotgun handy at all times.

    So when you think of the 1980s and all those guns in the back window of the southern "good ole boys" pickups, remember that some of those "good old boys" had college degrees, taught at the local high school, and had wild dog problems.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 09-18-2017 at 08:26 AM.
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  5. #25
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    Wild dog problems, never heard of that one before. Although I remember squirrel hunting as a teenager along our local river. I was walking a wooded high river bank area. Looking down at the river I saw a pack of dogs running along the edge of the river. The dogs were unaware of my presence. It was weird because it was 5 or 6 dogs of different breeds and sizes. Never saw them again or heard of a pack of dogs causing problems.

  6. #26
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Wisconsin DNR used to do wild dog round ups every once in awhile....all wardens called in and back up trucks....even a Piper Cub in the air.

    Many that were running and shot...had collars.
    Fido's not coming home tonight.

    That just bad owners....dog are dogs....
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  7. #27
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Wild dogs were once a real big problem in my old area but not so much any more.

    The coyotes eat most of them.
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  8. #28

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    People drop off all sorts of pets at edge of the glades. That is a contributor to the exotic python, boa, anaconda, tegu, monitor lizard, ad nazeum...

    They also drop off dogs and cats. The cats are well established and like most invasive plants and animals, it is that they out compete natives for resources. The dogs have the potential for feral dog packs. But, there has been only a few cases down here in South Florida. It's more humanitarian thing. Leaving a domesticated animal to fend for itself in the Everglades.

    There have even been people leaving horses out there.

    On the defense against dogs issue. The owner of the company I work for has a neighbor who has an unfriendly German Shepard. She came out to get in her car yesterday morning and the German Shepard was out of the gate and ran over snarling and growling. It chased her around the car and she jumped in the passenger door and was able to drive away. Still it scared her pretty good. You should not be afraid to walk to your car in your own driveway.

    I have been bitten by dogs. But, only one I would say was attacking me. I was running to a friends house when I was a kid and a dog ran down a driveway and ran behind me and bit me.

    All other times dogs that have run up to me have stopped a few feet away and just did aggression displays.

    On one hand I will defend against a threat to me or mine with what ever I deem necessary at the time. Without regard to contrary laws or consequences.

    On the other hand, twice my dogs have gone out through the front door when it wasn't closed properly. I have a 100lb Dogo and an 80lb + Red Nose. I always worry that someone like minded will do the same as I might. But, if they are on their property or approaching their family and are unknown to them and not leashed as they are required to be by law. I have no one to blame but myself for the loss of my dogs.

  9. #29
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Hold the phone. Back the truck up. Tegu? Tegu? No. See? No. That's not right. On the list!

  10. #30
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    I have two German Shepards that I've been training for a couple of years to be therapy dogs. They're good hearted. I take them to the old folks home. However, they are prey driven. If you move too fast they will react. It's best to just not move. Not a problem with old folks.

  11. #31

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    I was working on my dock and an iguana sneaked up behind me. He got within 3' of me and then I noticed him. He just proceeded on by me.

    A treacherous little bastard. Now, I know iguanas are harmless. But, there is nothing says you can't be harmless and treacherous too. Least I never read that in any rule book I ever read.

    And then we had a few Jesus Lizards running back and forth as well. Cool little critters!

  12. #32
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    Does neighborhood cats pissing on my front porch count for nuisance animals. I have three cats, all female, all spayed. They stay in the back yard. There is really no reason for any cat pissing on my front porch.

    Alan

  13. #33
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I don't need lizards sneaking up behind me. That's just not right. You could have three lizards sneak up behind you them WHAM suddenly it's a dinosaur. That's just not cool.


    Yeah, cats peeing on my porch? that would do it. I mark territory a bit different than cats do. It's a bit noisier too.

  14. #34
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Not a fan about pit bulls to say they are like other dogs is a mistake... I have read the reports, seen the statistics, IDGAD - in the past 20 years there have been more laws passed against dogs in parks that need to be mentioned. Clearly a few cat lovers are a bit leftist. You are in power to do what ever you want on your property, even if it pisses off your neighbor. Just don't shoot your neighbor, it doesn't go down well. Look I have heard that this dog once bites keeps it jaw locked on prey, included in the news on child faces and arms thru a fence. It may be true and very disturbing. I don't like haring about this... I too blame trainers and bad parents for making this decision. But I too see a different side as I am invited into the homes of rentals and the poor. And I see chained pitbulls & dogs that live in a 10x5 dining room on a slab where the carpets are ripped up so when they poop they can be cleaned up. The poor do not treat these dogs well - but I won't be a part of it.
    \

    Yes I love my dogs far too much.
    Last edited by Wise Old Owl; 09-24-2017 at 12:01 AM.
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  15. #35
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I don't need lizards sneaking up behind me. That's just not right. You could have three lizards sneak up behind you them WHAM suddenly it's a dinosaur. That's just not cool.
    It gets real bad when they start running in packs.

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  16. #36
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Yeah, 'zactly.

    Just stare at him. Humans get real nervous if you just stare at them. (the other way, George. He's behind you)

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  17. #37
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    I suggest you carry bear spray. If it does not work you might carry a hammer for heads. Nice sharp end walking stick. Pistol handy to use if situation/location is appropriate.

  18. #38

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    Dropping off animals you don't want is cowardly, and it makes me sick. The animals either die slowly of starvation, disease, or injury, they get eaten by something else, or they end up wild and dangerous to people.

    We had a dog a few years back that was lovable, not dangerous, but a total pain in the ***. It replaced a dog that we let roam free, but never caused any problems. This new one would go and break into a neighbors chicken coop and kill his chickens. We had to tie him up (on a run), along with another dog that everyone in the neighborhood loves, and was never any trouble on her own (or before with the other dog), but would follow along with this one. I tried to give the new dog away, but couldn't find anyone to take him. Well, about two weeks after we hooked them up, we noticed that the older dog was really skinny. The new dog had been eating all the food. That was the last straw. I was about to take the dog out somewhere and shoot him. I wasn't thrilled with the idea, but I didn't want to pay $75 for someone else to kill the dog (just as quickly, but a more cleanly). I was not going to release him and let him die a cruel death or become someone else problem. The only thing that saved the dog was someone finally took us up on the free dog offer.

    Unless they're a little off, no one is going to look forward to shooting their own dog (in this kind of circumstance anyway). But releasing him off somewhere is immature, irresponsible, cowardly, and cruel. Either cough the funds for the vet to do it, or do it yourself. Get a spine, or a set (depending on your gender). Sometimes you have to do things you don't want to do. It's part of being an adult.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  19. #39

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    Well said JLP! My dog Max came out of the NC woods. Skinny and covered in ticks. He had to be miserable but he attached himself to us. We tried to find his owners in vain and took him to the shelter. More like killing house. They said they'd put him down the next morning. Took him home and started training. Best dog I ever had in my life. I shudder to think what a terrible short life he would've had wandering through the mountains.

  20. #40
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLeePettimore View Post
    Dropping off animals you don't want is cowardly, and it makes me sick. The animals either die slowly of starvation, disease, or injury, they get eaten by something else, or they end up wild and dangerous to people.

    We had a dog a few years back that was lovable, not dangerous, but a total pain in the ***. It replaced a dog that we let roam free, but never caused any problems. This new one would go and break into a neighbors chicken coop and kill his chickens. We had to tie him up (on a run), along with another dog that everyone in the neighborhood loves, and was never any trouble on her own (or before with the other dog), but would follow along with this one. I tried to give the new dog away, but couldn't find anyone to take him. Well, about two weeks after we hooked them up, we noticed that the older dog was really skinny. The new dog had been eating all the food. That was the last straw. I was about to take the dog out somewhere and shoot him. I wasn't thrilled with the idea, but I didn't want to pay $75 for someone else to kill the dog (just as quickly, but a more cleanly). I was not going to release him and let him die a cruel death or become someone else problem. The only thing that saved the dog was someone finally took us up on the free dog offer.

    Unless they're a little off, no one is going to look forward to shooting their own dog (in this kind of circumstance anyway). But releasing him off somewhere is immature, irresponsible, cowardly, and cruel. Either cough the funds for the vet to do it, or do it yourself. Get a spine, or a set (depending on your gender). Sometimes you have to do things you don't want to do. It's part of being an adult.
    Well said....
    My dogs, my responsibility....for all aspects of our time together.... including deciding when it's "Time"
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