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Thread: Seed for Spring

  1. #1
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Default Seed for Spring

    I just ordered seed for next year's garden.

    I had to change suppliers due to the recent fires in California.

    My old supplier was burned out and decided to retire rather than rebuild.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.


  2. #2
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    every year I plan to save seed for next year and never getaroundttuit
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

  3. #3
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    That's a wise move....
    I would order my seed all years long...so I would have it ready for spring....at discounts.

    New catalogs come out it's already too late for some some flowers with along germination time.

    Used to get a lot from Seeds Blume Heirloom seeds...been out of business for a while now.....Too bad.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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  4. #4

    Default

    With online ordering, most of the seed guys have caught on.
    I already have some treelings on order for spring and working on the garden planner now. Will have the order in by Christmas.
    Onions start in mid-January now.
    Was really disappointed last year had one variety of artichoke that grew into small trees. Wasn't until they formed flower buds that I figured out the seeds were mis-packaged and were actually Cardoons. By the time the flower buds show, it's too late to do anything with them. All that work getting em through the spring freezes. At least 4 of the plants were real artichokes (different variety, different seed pack) so got some food out of the exercise.

    Finding more and more of that.
    A variety of bush beans last year grew more like pole beans. Had to trellis them.
    And one tomato variety, the plants grew with stunted leaves and spindly growth.
    If we are to have another contest in…our national existence I predict that the dividing line will not be Mason and Dixon's, but between patriotism & intelligence on the one side, and superstition, ambition & ignorance on the other…
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