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Thread: flying ducks with arrows

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Have you ever done it, or did you just find the video interesting?
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    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    I find it interesting but when it comes to bows I think of Ishi. There is no doubt Ishi was a excellent bowman but in the end he was found starving in a corral. Partly too he craved human companionship. I also am reminded about how quick the NA went from the bow to the firearm even though they were excellent bowman, they recognized that with the firearm they could achieve more consistent results over the bow.
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

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    they couldn't have been very good with a bow, or have good gear, if they thought that their "skill', with a musket, was a better deal. Given the handicap of not being able to make powder, not having a source of lead, the noise, the misfiring from moisture, the smoke, the corrosion-risk, muzzleloaders suck. With no way to seal the ignition source from moisture, a "flash in the pan' was common. So you had to leave the flashpan empty, for long term storage, or at least, had to "freshen" the dab of powder therein, if you were to have a reasonable expectation of ignition.. Flinching from having a fire light up under your nose, having to extract a charge from a gun (failure to ignite) all huge pitas.

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    Yeah. What a buncha dummies they must've been.

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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayd View Post
    they couldn't have been very good with a bow, or have good gear, if they thought that their "skill', with a musket, was a better deal. Given the handicap of not being able to make powder, not having a source of lead, the noise, the misfiring from moisture, the smoke, the corrosion-risk, muzzleloaders suck. With no way to seal the ignition source from moisture, a "flash in the pan' was common. So you had to leave the flashpan empty, for long term storage, or at least, had to "freshen" the dab of powder therein, if you were to have a reasonable expectation of ignition.. Flinching from having a fire light up under your nose, having to extract a charge from a gun (failure to ignite) all huge pitas.
    Seems they had stumbled along for 40,000 years and continued to use that inferior gear and skill to stay alive in the Americas, and survived pretty well until the Europeans got here. I have seen many native American bows and arrows and their craftsmanship equals anything done by today's "primitive archers" who use identical equipment.

    From someone that has built, hunted with, shot competition at the national level and carried muzzle loaders in the field for the better part of 60 years I have to say that you are flapping your gums without knowing a single thing about the noise you are making.

    None of the problems you mention even exist for a person that knows how to use and maintain a muzzle loader, and the Indians did learn to maintain and repair their firearms. There have been many "tool kits" recovered from village sites containing vises, files, hacksaws and other hand tools.

    Even your history is drawn straight from myth. The Europeans had established an extensive supply/trade system in the eastern half of North America before the flintlock ignition system was even invented (1625 and not common until 1630-1650). Most of the tribes had trade forts at central locations and big villages had resident traders. They had access to a reliable and steady source of powder and lead. Even before firearms reached the natives the Iroquois elders were complaining about the young men refusing to learn to knap flint because they could trade for iron arrowheads.

    The Indians were also very picky about what their firearms should be. They wanted something light but rugged, small bore to save lead and a long barrel to get the most out of a small powder charge. Each European nation developed a firearm specifically to meet the demands of the tribes they serviced.

    In fact, the Indian pattern trade gun had been established for almost 100 years before the European settlers developed a pattern of their own, which evolved into the American long rifle.
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    Well, I have never tried to arrow a flying duck but I have killed a flying ringneck pheasant with a flu-flu arrow from my long bow. Given enough opportunities at ducks landing in a decoy spread, I think I could take one down (or could before all those failed shoulder operations ended my ability to shoot a bow).
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    Right, and all the Indians knew all that, right? and had the very best powder and guns given to them, right? and they STILL tossed aside their bows, which were so wonderfully made (and feeble) Their "small bore" specialized trade MUSKET was about 20 ga size. and its effective range, vs a man or a deer, in the hands of a superstitious, completely un-schooled indian was about 30m, whoopee. then take at least 30 seconds to reload. You can charge 30m in 5 seconds or less, from a standing start and the Indians didn't train with the bayonet. So get off your fantasy, you're making yourself look SUPER ignorant
    Last edited by jayd; 08-05-2017 at 04:38 PM.

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    https://truewestmagazine.com/weapons...e-indian-wars/

    I bet they shortened those barrels on a lathe, don't you? and remounted the front sight perfectly, too. :-) get out of here.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    You do realize that bows have been around about 64,000 years and were one of the primary weapons of war from prehistoric times until the 19th century? You need to get off your high horse. Your lack of of knowledge shows in most of you posts. The only reason we are letting you hang around is because things are a bit slow and you are a bit fun to play with. That sound you here is the drag set on the reel.

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    uh oh. Not yet! I still have some Reeses left.

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    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    the transition from bow to firearm was a fad, the NA simply wanted to be one of the cool kids. The eskimo had it figured out though instead of bow they used a bolo for hunting ducks.
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I guess I hurt his feelings he logged off.

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    Dang it. Oh well I have to p.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Well go outside! Don't do like you did last time and use the sink. You turned the ice yellow!

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Oh geeze! I thought it was lemonade.
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    Senior Member Manwithnoname's Avatar
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    All the drama aside, anyone that may be interested, outdoor Oklahoma has an episode on bow hunting squirrels. Is probably in their archives by now. I liked it well enough to have watched it a couple of times.

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    I have a hard time hitting ducks with a 12 ga....so don't want to use a bow.... I already have enough GameGetters 2117's @ $6 bucks each....... scattered over Wisconsin swamps.
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    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    do you still need a waterfowl stamp to hut ducks with a bow?
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

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    Senior Member Manwithnoname's Avatar
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    Ya know, to my recollection of Oklahoma regz, I don't even think bow hunting waterfowl is legal. I know for a fact any kind of rifle, pistol or shotgun smaller than 20ga is illegal.

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