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Thread: Question about planting ordinary field wheat

  1. #1

    Default Question about planting ordinary field wheat

    So, I figured out that I can use ordinary wheat out of a field for planting wheat. How do I know if I have winter wheat or spring wheat, or does it matter?
    Does it hold true for all of the grains that I can use ordinary field grains for planting?


  2. #2

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    Not sure how you'd tell if you had winter what or spring wheat without asking whoever grew it.
    As for does it matter, yeah, sort of. Spring wheat is planted in spring and harvested in fall. It usually winter-kills. Winter wheat is planted in the fall, it gets some growth on it before winter sets in, then it sets seeds the following summer. I kind of doubt that you can plant winter wheat in spring. I think it needs that cold dormancy to set seed, kind of like a biennial, but am not sure. Never really had any interest in growing wheat.

    Define "field grain". Some of the wheats used for field grain are more silage or Green Manure than human-edible. There's also the matter of seed size and yield. Wheat doesn't just fall into two classes either. They split into soft and hard, as well as by gluten content, some better suited than others for baking. Sure you can eat the field wheat (assuming it hasn't been treated with chemicals for any reason.) But if you are putting a lot of area under tillage for it for quite some time, why leave it to chance?
    If we are to have another contest in…our national existence I predict that the dividing line will not be Mason and Dixon's, but between patriotism & intelligence on the one side, and superstition, ambition & ignorance on the other…
    ~ President Ulysses S. Grant

  3. #3
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Maybe you can and maybe you can't. Do you know if the wheat you have selected is a hybrid or not? The seed from a hybrid wheat plant (or any hybrid plant) may well be sterile or not true to the parent plant. Either way, you don't wind up with what you want. How much are you trying to plant and what is the reason?

  4. #4

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    Never planted wheat. Just learning what I can do. I have a 10'x10' area ready to plant. I just want to get a few cups, or so to thrash and winnow and grind to make a loaf of bread. Thought it would be nice to know what, why and how. Really hard to find any wheat for sale around here. May have to go ask a farmer for some. Wife has a bag of 3 year old organic wheat. Have some in the window seeing if it will sprout. No idea what it is.

  5. #5
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Got a Walmart?

    You can order wheat berries site to store.

    https://www.walmart.com/search/?quer...=&wl8=&veh=sem

    You might want to do a google search for wheat growing, history of wheat,,,,,

    I would do it for you, since you don't know how to google search, but I don't give a crap.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 06-14-2017 at 02:46 PM.
    We came here to have family fun so shut up and make a freekin' smore!

  6. #6

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    So anyway, the bag of wheat that I mentioned above, I sprouted some of it. What I don't know is if it is winter wheat, spring wheat, or if it matters with organic wheat. This is Arrow Mills Organic Whole Grain Wheat. Any Ideas if I should plant it now?

  7. #7
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyrat
    I don't give a crap.


    Constipated, huh?

  8. #8

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    http://bfy.tw/COg7

    Or if you need fewer choices:
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-...t-zmaz10fmzraw

    Arrow Mills' current website doesn't list your product. You could send them an email and ask what it is.
    Of course it matters if it's spring or winter wheat. Organic is only the method of how it was grown. Considering it is already June, if it's spring wheat you're too late. If it's winter wheat you are too early. If you wait and plant it as winter wheat and it is spring wheat it will likely winter kill.
    Why don't you try planting 1/3 now, 1/3 in fall and 1/3 next spring?

    You can buy 25lb buckets of identified edible wheat just about anywhere.
    https://www.lehmans.com/product/25-l...es/food-pantry
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Augason-F...26-lb/22985145
    Same goes for seed wheat
    soft varieties (not so good for breads):
    http://www.territorialseed.com/produ...at-grains-seed
    (this is an annual so spring plant.)
    http://www.territorialseed.com/produ...over_Crop_Seed
    (same, an annual.)
    http://www.territorialseed.com/produ...at-grains-seed
    Spring wheat in the north, winter wheat in the south.

    Hard varieties (Read the instructions.)
    http://sustainableseedco.com/hard-re...r-wheat-seeds/
    Last edited by LowKey; 06-15-2017 at 08:13 PM.
    If we are to have another contest in…our national existence I predict that the dividing line will not be Mason and Dixon's, but between patriotism & intelligence on the one side, and superstition, ambition & ignorance on the other…
    ~ President Ulysses S. Grant

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