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Thread: Afraid in the jungle alone at night

  1. #41

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    snaggle tooth women wid a pack of ragamuffins.
    sounds like the hollers in harlan,county ky. t was a sad time.
    coyotes listen to them, like children of the night what music they make.


  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by madmax View Post
    Of the FL poisonous snakes I fear the Coral the least. They have fangs in the back of their mouth and have to gnaw on like a little finger or something. The big rattlers are scary but they rattle most of the time. Cottonmouths don't. The ones that scare me the most are juvenile pygmy rattlers. Tiny. One poor lady got bit in the garden department of Walmart a few years ago. Babies tend to inject their whole load of venom.
    Max, while fearing the Coral Snake the least is good. The snake is a front fanged snake. I'll link a video on Coral Snakes look at about 4:50.

    I have been bitten by a juvenile water moccasin.The area around the bite turned black for approx. a year. I didn't seek medical attention. If you make it through the first 24 hours on a Moccasin or copperhead bite your good. LOL

    The Florida woods AKA jungles can be intimidating. Learn what everything is as best you can. It's funny that sounds are the thing that scares the folks the most.

  3. #43

  4. #44

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    huh. I swear I read in more than one place the fangs were in the rear. Your vid mentioned chewing. Heard that too. Read also them having a neurotoxin. Conversation with our vet revealed the coral snake bite to a dog (or any pet I guess) is the scariest. They really don't have anything to counteract that venom.

    Glad you came out of that bite ok. I don't want to experience that though. Won't stop me from getting out there. A stick in hand seems to be my go to snake tool. Stir that dead palm leaf before looking under it. Tap that log before stepping over it. Etc.

    Thanks for the edification on the coral snake fangs,

  5. #45
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    OK, I have no experience with snakes even though I spend lots of time on and around the Mississippi River. I'm doing good to see a snake every five or so years. The cold winters keep the snake population in check. The rocky areas have been known to harbor
    rattle snakes but that is rare.

    When I'm walking through the jungle in Florida I always have long walking stick where I poke around ahead of myself. I'm looking for snakes all the time. What do you guys do for snake safety, where do you look for them or stay away from? I hear of snakes
    boots but don't have any,, yet.

  6. #46

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    I bought snake boots specifically for pushing through palmettos (primarily tracking down shot game). I used to run around barefoot a lot in camp. Hiking sneakers on trails.

    This may sound groovy but slow down as the foliage gets thicker and pay attention (stay in the moment). Besides those little pygmies I am REALLY careful getting out of my canoe in cypress knees and overhead branches.

    I saw 3 harmless snakes the other day on a hike. Trying to get warm on the trail in the sun. I'm not a snake killer unless they are a danger to camp or home. I don't have the skill to relocate. Right now there is a cobra loose in our neighborhood. It's dead if I see it in my yard.

  7. #47
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    Okay. That made the list.

  8. #48
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    I grew up in South Louisiana. We ran around in the swamps at night because we didn't know any different. There wasn't anything that would get you in there at night that wouldn't get you in broad daylight. Camping and sleeping on the ground never was a problem.

    Then when I moved to South Texas, things changed. I've done plenty of camping but it's been in a zipped up tent. I'm not sleeping on the ground down here. If I have to spend the night on the ground, I'm not going to be asleep.

    I guess it's all in what you're used to. We never gave the cottonmouths, alligators or other snakes a second thought. Of course, being ten foot tall and bullet proof helped a lot.

    Alan

  9. #49
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    I need to check out Louisiana some time. Should be plenty of wild hogs there to hunt. Not sure how my wife would take to Louisiana. She is more hillbilly and not so much a swamp person.

  10. #50
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    Northern part looks like Wisconsin.....pines tree, field and pipe lines........
    Swamps are way south and along the rivers.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
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    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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  11. #51
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    I had an Eastern Arms dog leg 410 shotgun that I used until I was 14. I used my dad's and Grandfather's rifles for deer hunting in South Texas and my Win Mod 63 22 for rabbits in Texas also, but shotguns were the rule in South LA. When I was 14 my dad gave me a Stevens 311D SXS 20 ga. That moved my hunting into an whole nuther realm. We weren't lacking for squirrels, rabbits, woodcock, snipe, doves and occasionally a duck or two. I spent weekends in the swamp in hip boots in the water 90% of the time. Every so often I'd find a huge live oak tree that had made its own island from centuries of dropped leaves and acorns. Those places were always good for a squirrel or three and a place to rest out of the water.

    I never gave much thought to being lost. Truth was, I was lost as soon as I walked out in the swamp. It was actually just a 2500 acre swamp between the island that was our town, The Atchafalaya River, Bayou Boeuf and Lake Palourde. All I had to do was not walk in a circle and I would come out somewhere I knew. When I think back on it now it was really a remarkable life. No one ever came looking for me when I was out very late or all night. My dad simply had faith in my ability to get myself out of trouble, even at 14. It gets very dark in the swamp at night. It really wouldn't have done any good to look for me anyway, it is very unlikely that anyone without a tracking dog could have found me or anything else in 2500 acres of South LA swamp.

    I still have that Stevens and each of my three sons has learned to shoot using it. Even #1 wife has defended the homestead once or twice with it.

    There is a period of time just before and just after dark when the mosquitos will be nearly unbearable. You just have to cover up, hunker down and wait them out. As soon as it cools down, so do the mosquitos. I never went out there after dark in the summer, only during hunting season in the winter time.

    Alan

  12. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim Glass View Post
    OK, I have no experience with snakes even though I spend lots of time on and around the Mississippi River. I'm doing good to see a snake every five or so years. The cold winters keep the snake population in check. The rocky areas have been known to harbor
    rattle snakes but that is rare.

    When I'm walking through the jungle in Florida I always have long walking stick where I poke around ahead of myself. I'm looking for snakes all the time. What do you guys do for snake safety, where do you look for them or stay away from? I hear of snakes
    boots but don't have any,, yet.
    I am most conscious of the possibility of being bitten when in the saw palmettos. That is prime Eastern Diamondback territory. I have heard plenty of stories down here where people with snake boots have knelt down to rig their pack or climber at the base of their stand tree and gotten bit above their boots. So, I make sure I am clear before kneeling down or reaching. Remember, you are dealing with some of the greatest camouflage in the animal kingdom.

    A pair of leather cowboy boots are as good against our snakes as any pair of snake boots anyways. So, I don't wear snake boots. I wear either leather work boots or sandals.

    I got a video where we were taking a guy through to his first swamp pond. They were talking about snakes. I told him not to worry if he got bit by a snake I knew exactly what to do. Not walk near where you just got bit!

  13. #53
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    A rattlesnake bite will ruin your whole year. Bad news is it probably won't kill you. One of our teachers was cleaning out his garage, picked up a box and a snake came out of it and bit him on the forearm. 12 min later he's in the ER getting prepped for anti-venom. Even so, his arm swelled to the size of his calf, they had to make longitudinal cuts to relieve swelling and allow for blood flow and he was out of action for a year. This guy was a former Sgt. Major in the USMC and was acquainted with some degree of hardship. You don't want a Rattlesnake bite.

    One of our female students was bitten on the ankle by a copperhead. The only proof she had was two ink circles where the Dr. had identified the fang marks. Probably a dry bite but still…

    In all my experience with cottonmouths, I never saw or heard of a bite. I've killed a thousand of the things at least. I've never personally seen or heard of a coral snake bite.

    Rattlesnakes, yes.

    Alan

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim Glass View Post
    I need to check out Louisiana some time. Should be plenty of wild hogs there to hunt. Not sure how my wife would take to Louisiana. She is more hillbilly and not so much a swamp person.
    From what I've heard, the wild hog population has done the same as it's done everywhere else, exploded. That's in north and central LA. In all my time in south LA I never saw or saw sign of hogs.

    I was hunting around Slidel many years ago and walked up into a bunch of hogs. In those days there were wild hogs and there were earmarked hogs feed on mast. It was important to know and be able to tell the difference.

    Alan

  15. #55

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    Down here in South Florida the coral snake is least likely to envenomate, with most experts saying you would probably have to pick up and squeeze a coral snake to get a bite. I have personally seen coral snakes handled bare handed by herpetologists. Good leather gloves are a better bet if you have to move one. In the past 40 years one person has died as a result of a coral snake bite. He didn't seek treatment. An average of 47 people are bitten each year in Florida.

    I have read that most bites from Pygmy Rattlers are in nursery or plant centers at stores. Most of the pygmy Rattlers I have encountered were on dirt roads or dry trails where they were sunning themselves. I have poked them with my arrow and couldn't get a rise out of them. I do look in potted plants though. LOL

    Cottonmouths and Copperheads are very closely related. They have the mildest venom for "venomous" snakes in Florida. I know of quite a few Cottonmouth bites. I have had them hit at my boot when I have stepped on them. I have also been bitten barefoot. I believe these account for the majority of bites in South Florida. Homes were built on the pine ridges and scrub land first in South Florida and that was the prime rattler habitat. Now the development is and has been in the swamps and marshes of the glades. Prime cottonmouth territory.

    Eastern Diamondbacks are for sure the most dangerous snake down here. They are the largest venomous snake native to North America.

    I don't think they monitor the bites by species anymore anyways. Unless it was marked like a coral snake or has a description that is way off and venom that is acting differently than the pit viper family. They will just give you the same antivenom for any pit viper here. The variables are the dosage. That is why you need to mark the time and circle the affected area. If you don't have a fine sharpie (you can get these like 2" long) use your phone's camera from as uniform a distance from the bite as possible.

  16. #56
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    So which one is Rick?
    The one screaming like a girl.
    Of course. Was he actually bitten.
    No. He saw a snake from about 50 feet.
    What kind of snake was it?
    It was actually an earth worm.
    Seriously?

  17. #57

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    Rick Rick. All our snakes, alligators, crocodiles, anacondas, pythons, bears, and panthers are actually Disney animatronics. It's all fake. You can come frolic in the swamp with abandon. Come on down!

  18. #58
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    Nuhuh. Been there seen it. It's all on the list. Fire ants too.

    Is this it?
    Yep, Mason Dixon line.
    This is as far south as I'm going then. Ya'll have a good trip.

  19. #59

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    Here is a video on Florida's 6 native venomous snakes. I have to say native because we got cobras and mambas wandering around from time to time also.


  20. #60
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    And that, my friend, is why those states have overgrowth and water and are waaaaaaay down south. By the way, those guys are all sorts of snake ship crazy. See, I know that snake is seeing them in Infrared, ultraviolet and infra ultra colors I've never thought of so it can see all sorts of hanging down parts that appear to be concealed. At least where I am that snake can't even see me...in any sort of color.

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