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Thread: Bushcraft & Camping Gear

  1. #1
    Senior Member gcckoka's Avatar
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    Default Bushcraft & Camping Gear

    Many people have problems deciding what gear they need when they start to go in the woods, so here's what I carry
    hope you like it or find it helpful



    PS im posting this from my phone , I'm living of the grid for one week
    Check out my survival youtube channel : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCup...cRQ3O29ZB7Ybiw


  2. #2
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Very nice. It's amazing how similar gear is regardless of the continent. I carry much of the same things. Minus the Jim Beam.

  3. #3
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Jim Bean won't burn in a Penny stove........
    Maybe add a list?

    For some reason You Tubes aren't working for me.....on Chrome...?
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

  4. #4
    Senior Member Antonyraison's Avatar
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    Cool I carry very similar equipment,just don't take an axe or wisky, and I don't personally like fire-arms so I also don't carry that.
    What about cordage? And a compass?
    Last edited by Antonyraison; 01-18-2017 at 12:06 PM.
    My youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ultsmackdown Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/antonyraison/

    (BOSWA) ELITE SURVIVAL RANGER - BSR/16/05

  5. #5

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    Nice kit there! I take a small hatchet too, might upgrade to a boys axe soon. Handled a Council Tools Boys axe and it felt really good in hand. I have a Hudsen Bay from Council, its in between a hatchet and boys axe and I'm not really feeling it.

  6. #6
    Junior Member Fatizi's Avatar
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    A lot of “survival-enthusiasts” like to challenge their skills with a minimal or restricted set of a gear. I’m all for that if done with a safety net and proper gear nearby for emergencies. My son and I have done some testing of our own and we always had appropriate gear nearby if the conditions turned seriously south or safety/health was at risk. I always recommend taking a partner if you do plan to test skills and minimal kit

    A lot of people talk “pocket survival kits” or minimalist kits or how their outdoors EDC is their emergency kit. That’s all good, but I always strongly advocate doing a little testing in your own back yard before plunging off into the back-forty on a solo trip with what’s in your pockets. I’ve been in some miserable, wet, cold and hot conditions during training, exercises and combat; I much prefer to “survive” a recreational incident with more comfort and less effort. Outside of a mechanical or serious injury that would prevent self-rescue, the true survivalist would mitigate most bad situations with thorough planning, preparation, adequate training and proper gear. As much as my day-hike kit is adequate enough for me, I really pack it to assist others more so than my worse-case scenarios for myself.

    My wife and I do a lot of backpacking and we have many bushcraft bags like for example Osprey or Deuter https://secretstorages.com/best-bushcraft-backpacks/ and we see a lot of over-prepared (overly burdened) and under-prepared people on the trail. And yes, we recently had to assist an older gentleman that was dehydrated and showing signs of heat exhaustion early this year just as he was three days into his hike which was planned for a couple weeks. Not only is it important to know your own physical limitations and recognized signs such as dehydration, hypo/hyperthermia, etc., but also assess the health of others you meet.

    I’m always amazed how unprepared many day-hikers are and some of the hikes we’ve been on turn out being extremely rugged and 10-12 miles yet some individuals are extremely out of shape, have no water, wearing flip flops, have no rain gear, can’t understand why they don’t have a cell phone signal, poorly judged time/distance with darkness approaching, and show evident sings of heat exhaustion or hypothermia.
    Last edited by Fatizi; 08-08-2018 at 08:36 AM.

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