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Thread: Setting up a survival bag

  1. #1

    Default Setting up a survival bag

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    Hi i'm new so i thought i'd talk about something simple just to open some doors. Lately I've been planning out my survival bag that i will be carrying with me when ever i go adventuring into the woods. My goal is to learn all there is to know about self reliance. An impossible task i know! but still i'm caught up in learning all of the medicinal uses of different herbs and trees, what they're good for and etc.. very interesting! My idea is to go tool heavy and the goal is long term sustainment. However for each tool i carry i must have the knowledge to use such tool for maximum effectiveness in the field. I want to make it clear this is not for some fantasy SHTF situation. I have a genuine fear of being homeless some day lol. Anyway,

    My backpack is a boyt assault pack, waterproof heavy duty construction, rubber bottom.

    Main items
    - Huskvarna arm's length axe (Processing fire wood, carving, shaping & shaving)
    - Knife 5.5" blade, tanto style tip, 90 degree spine for striking a ferro rod, hand forged from high carbon steel, full tang, steel hand guard, maple handle, wood carved sheath. I find the Tanto helps when making fire boards.
    - Draw knife 1' hand forged, leather wrapped handle. (Steel unknown but it's pretty sharp.)
    - Spectre take down bow, 45lb (3 arrows) Attempted to make my own bow but it broke I can make a survival bow, arrows and bow strings.
    - Gi mess kit, stainless steel (Baking, frying)
    - Canteen, stainless steel with cup.
    - 22 gauge trapping wire.
    - Buck saw (Weighs nothing so why not)

    Fire kit
    - Ferro rod, 1/2" diameter 6" long
    - Lighters, 1 in my pocket, 1 in my coat, 2 in my pack. (I know how to make a fire with a dead lighter aswell.)
    - Pine resin
    - Altoids tin w/ char cloth.

    Food
    - 3 bags cornmeal mix (1500 cal ea.) I make pancakes and pour honey on top, usually get's me through the day.
    - 2 large chocolate bars (600 cal ea.)
    - 1 Can peanut butter (1500 cal)
    - 1 nesquick powdered chocolate mix (Unsure)
    - 1 jar 100% raw honey

    -
    Small stuff
    - Strait razor with a block of soap and a brush.
    - Scissors for cutting my hair.
    - assorted needles, big, small and curved.
    - Upholstery thread
    - Waxed cotton cord
    - Punch w/ leather wrapped handle (Squared for drilling holes as well)
    - Fish hooks, two fishing yoyo's and some line.
    - Small file

    -
    Thermal gear
    - Short sleeve shirt & long sleeve
    - Wool socks
    - Rain coat and rain pants, heavy duty.
    - Wool cap.
    for winter...
    - Thermal pants
    - M65 field jacket
    - Lined gloves

    -
    I don't carry a blanket or a tarp because if it's winter i wear a coat with lots of layers, then a rain coat and rain pants. Nice and warm even in a blizzard, tuck my raincoat into my rain pants, tighten my belt and i'm waterproof! Boots are waterproof and gortex lined. I also wear a spearhead around my neck just in case i need it to protect myself from lions or people who look at me funny.

    -
    Any thoughts? i want to reduce the weight it's kinda heavy. I'm thinking for long term it.. has to be heavy,,
    Last edited by crashdive123; 03-11-2017 at 09:10 PM. Reason: Restored OP


  2. #2

    Default

    Machete, pot, blankey.

    pocket fishing kit is a luxury.
    Last edited by madmax; 01-11-2017 at 06:10 PM.

  3. #3

    Default

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    That was a fast response. Anyway, bushes aren't really a problem up north unless you go near the swamps. I stay clear. Any wood working i can do with my axe.
    A full sized pot would be cool, i could maybe hang it on the outside but i'm afraid of rust.
    Last edited by crashdive123; 03-11-2017 at 09:11 PM. Reason: Restored OP

  4. #4

    Default

    Well I did it. I'm in FL. Big difference from northern woods. And I have experience there as well.

    Skill with an axe is soooo important up there.

  5. #5

    Default

    Do over.

    I apologize.

    You asked a great question (That was answered a lot in other threads) and I got crappy. Sorry.

    I would suggest perusing this sites old threads and reap the knowledge within.

  6. #6
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    If it were me, I would include a sleeping bag/Bivey,.....and a tarp
    FAK
    One version....or the 10 Essentials....
    1. Appropriate Clothing
    2. Shelter
    3. Water
    4. Fire
    5. Knife/Tool
    6. First Aid/Skin Protection
    7. Navigation
    8. Signal/Illumination
    9. Calories
    10. Security/Situational Awareness





    (Google search with turn up a lot of versions)
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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  7. #7

    Default

    I don't have a sleeping bag or bivey, but i do have a wool blanket. It's 90% and i stitched three sides so it's like a sleeping bag i guess? Just need a way to keep it dry because it doesn't fit in my bag. A tarp is a temporary shelter, but ofc i should probably add that as well.

    hmm navigation.. never really needed it, i know my area very well. If i do for what ever reason need to find my way i can use the stars or magnetize a needle for a compass. At night if you crouch low in the moonlight you can see quite a ways. They used to call me the raccoon because they thought i could see in the dark haha, it's true if you adjust your eyes long enough you can make out shapes even in the darkness.
    Last edited by crashdive123; 03-11-2017 at 09:12 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by InTheShadows View Post
    Any thoughts? i want to reduce the weight it's kinda heavy. I'm thinking for long term it.. has to be heavy,,
    Why are you thinking "Long term"?

    Are you intending to rebuild civilization after the zombie Apocalypse out of your backpack?

    We are a realistic bunch around here and realize that most people "lost in the woods" are rescued within 72 hours. Those that are not seem to be found by hunters next fall.

    Weather and man made or natural disasters are also usually short term incidents requiring a properly stocked wallet rather than the perfect "survival bag". The motel down the road wants cash or credit card. You move from the danger zone out of the danger zone and being in the Holiday Inn in the next town normally does not qualify you as a refugee.

    And since you are new, and most of the guys that have replied have been running the woods for 50-60 years, take our word for it, you need the tarp and a good sleeping bag. Those two items will keep you alive when everything else has failed you. Not having one does not mean you can get by without one. Get yourself a decent sleeping bag and a shelter if you are going to run the woods.

    Ditch the bow unless you are an elf or Hobbit. You are a grown up 22 year old and able to buy a proper firearm anywhere in the U.S. Well chosen it will be lighter, be easier to conceal and be more effective.

    Ditch the draw-knife. You will not be building any cabinets or furniture.

    Ditch the scissors, use the ones on your multi-tool or SAK which you did not include in your list. Besides, your hair will not grow that much in three days. You could probably get by without the axe too but it might be handy so keep it if you want. Ditch the straight razor, you will hurt yourself with that thing!

    Get the compass. You will eventually need to know which way your are going and even in the "area you know" you can get turned around and spend an hour going the wrong direction.

    You are new, so keep asking questions. We will grumble and fuss at you but we will also tell you what you need to know. That's what old geezers do.

    We are the people Hillary warned you about.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 01-11-2017 at 11:30 PM.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  9. #9

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    Finally someone with a little fire in their belly! exactly what i came here for.

    I'm thinking long term because i fear i may be homeless temporarily in the not so distant future, as it stands i make 200$ a week. That's not enough to live a normal life.
    As for the bow, I've killed plenty of animals with my bow and i'm a good shot, i do own an SKS type 56, 870 remmington, Marlin 30-30 and a mosin nagant 91-30 but New York has one of the strictest gun control laws in the country. I cannot simply throw a rifle over my shoulder and go (I wish i could), i will be harassed and more than likely arrested. I would need a pistol permit to own a handgun, and a concealed carry license for that. A bow that has been taken down and unstrung poses no legal repercussions. So that's why i have a bow. Fishing (Passive), trapping (Passive) then hunt with my bow.
    The draw knife, i completely agree it's useless.. unless i want to make a new bow because mine broke.
    Scissors well, i need to look good for that job interview once Trump fixes this messed up economy ya know? The strait razor too, and i won't cut myself I've been using one for the past three years every single day.

    Compass got it, Tarp, got it, and wool blanket got it.
    Last edited by crashdive123; 03-11-2017 at 09:13 PM. Reason: Restored OP

  10. #10
    Senior Member Antonyraison's Avatar
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    I have nothing much to add from what others have suggested,
    I wouldn't rely on navigation from stars and a magnizited needle, they may be able to give you a general direction, but not accurate,
    get a compass, a good orienteering one, anyone that would have done Navigation with maps and compass would know, that true north and magnetic north Differ that alone will get you lost if you using a map, also a magnetic needle will not give you any indication of proper bearings, the difference of a few degrees off will set you miles and miles off.

    Add cordage, like some para-cord or bank line, I would certainly also add a tarp or two, you will want a shelter, you cant just always sleep in your clothing some where.

    I never carry a fire arm into the bush or care to own one, but that is my choice (note I live in southern Africa) and I have often been out in leopard territory, and out in hippo Territory, its not the animals that I am afraid of I trust them more than People , I rarely am ever out longer then 72 hours

    Carry a good Stainless steel water bottle to boil and filter water if needed.
    a shemag and or a buff (just very useful)
    Maybe some gloves (cutting your hands up processing and or working with wood and other things (prevent injury)
    MMM I would carry a head lamp with spare batteries ( that way you can work at night hands free)


    I know how to make traps, and hunt small game with primitive weapons, and I carry a small fishing kit.
    My youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ultsmackdown Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/antonyraison/

    (BOSWA) ELITE SURVIVAL RANGER - BSR/16/07

  11. #11

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    I've been through many navigation classes, i'm confident i could use a map and compass. The issue is how do you find a map with the coordinate grids on it? I've searched google and i can get a hold of some basic maps but none of them have a grid. Even so i have no way of printing them.

    Got para cord and spent all morning learning how to do a bow drill fire, it was warm outside today. Also acquired 3 extra arrows, they we're fairly inexpensive.
    Last edited by crashdive123; 03-11-2017 at 09:18 PM. Reason: Restored OP

  12. #12
    Senior Member Antonyraison's Avatar
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    Bowdrill is a useful skill, tough to learn but self rewarding.. I personally would use it as a very last resort, as it's not always the most reliable.. so more of a novelty to me and something to show to my friends to impress them hahaha
    My youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ultsmackdown Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/antonyraison/

    (BOSWA) ELITE SURVIVAL RANGER - BSR/16/07

  13. #13
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by InTheShadows View Post
    I've been through many navigation classes, i'm confident i could use a map and compass. The issue is how do you find a map with the coordinate grids on it? I've searched google and i can get a hold of some basic maps but none of them have a grid. Even so i have no way of printing them.

    Got para cord and spent all morning learning how to do a bow drill fire, it was warm outside today. Also acquired 3 extra arrows, they we're fairly inexpensive.

    I don't worry so much about wild animals, i agree people are much more dangerous. It's better to avoid them if possible.

    I do have a german shepherd, he's only a year old i've been trying to teach him to track but all he wants to do is find the peanut butter lol.
    You get your maps from the USGS.

    https://store.usgs.gov/b2c_usgs/usgs...a=%24ROOT)/.do

    Scroll in to find your section.

    Sounds like you really do not have a problem that can not be solved by a job change, location change, or a second job.

    At that point the questions become recreational and not survival.

    And if one job is not enough think about getting two jobs. Or going back to school on your GI benefits. My kids did that and managed to graduate college, support a family with a little part time work along the way.

    Working two jobs or working and going to school is not an unusual pursuit and normally results in enough money to pay the rent and buy some food one way or another.

    Even people with college degrees and real jobs often have a second income to make ends meet.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by InTheShadows View Post
    Hi i'm new so i thought i'd talk about something simple just to open some doors. Lately I've been planning out my survival bag that i will be carrying with me when ever i go adventuring into the woods. My goal is to learn all there is to know about self reliance. An impossible task i know! but still i'm caught up in learning all of the medicinal uses of different herbs and trees, what they're good for and etc.. very interesting! My idea is to go tool heavy and the goal is long term sustainment. However for each tool i carry i must have the knowledge to use such tool for maximum effectiveness in the field. I want to make it clear this is not for some fantasy SHTF situation. I have a genuine fear of being homeless some day lol. Anyway,

    My backpack is a boyt assault pack, waterproof heavy duty construction, rubber bottom.

    Main items
    - Huskvarna arm's length axe (Processing fire wood, carving, shaping & shaving)
    - Knife 5.5" blade, tanto style tip, 90 degree spine for striking a ferro rod, hand forged from high carbon steel, full tang, steel hand guard, maple handle, wood carved sheath. I find the Tanto helps when making fire boards.
    - Draw knife 1' hand forged, leather wrapped handle. (Steel unknown but it's pretty sharp.)
    - Spectre take down bow, 45lb (3 arrows) Attempted to make my own bow but it broke I can make a survival bow, arrows and bow strings.
    - Gi mess kit, stainless steel (Baking, frying)
    - Canteen, stainless steel with cup.
    - 22 gauge trapping wire.
    - Buck saw (Weighs nothing so why not)

    Fire kit
    - Ferro rod, 1/2" diameter 6" long
    - Lighters, 1 in my pocket, 1 in my coat, 2 in my pack. (I know how to make a fire with a dead lighter aswell.)
    - Pine resin
    - Altoids tin w/ char cloth.

    Food
    - 3 bags cornmeal mix (1500 cal ea.) I make pancakes and pour honey on top, usually get's me through the day.
    - 2 large chocolate bars (600 cal ea.)
    - 1 Can peanut butter (1500 cal)
    - 1 nesquick powdered chocolate mix (Unsure)
    - 1 jar 100% raw honey
    - Half can of crisco lard.

    Small stuff
    - Strait razor with a block of soap and a brush.
    - Scissors for cutting my hair.
    - assorted needles, big, small and curved.
    - Upholstery thread
    - Waxed cotton cord
    - Punch w/ leather wrapped handle (Squared for drilling holes as well)
    - Fish hooks, two fishing yoyo's and some line.
    - Small file

    Thermal gear
    - Short sleeve shirt & long sleeve
    - Wool socks
    - Rain coat and rain pants, heavy duty.
    - Wool cap.
    for winter...
    - Thermal pants
    - M65 field jacket
    - Lined gloves

    I don't carry a blanket or a tarp because if it's winter i wear a coat with lots of layers, then a rain coat and rain pants. Nice and warm even in a blizzard, tuck my raincoat into my rain pants, tighten my belt and i'm waterproof! Boots are waterproof and gortex lined. I also wear a spearhead around my neck just in case i need it to protect myself from lions or people who look at me funny.

    Any thoughts? i want to reduce the weight it's kinda heavy. I'm thinking for long term it.. has to be heavy,,

    If you're just looking for something to take with you into the woods for a few hours, like a daypack or overnight bag (not really a long-term wilderness survival bag), I think you're carrying a lot. I've really been trying to downsize my hiking/bushcraft bag as a well. I think that the best thing you can (thing that did the most for me) was read some books on the topic. I have Advanced Bushcraft by Dave Canterbury, Modern Survival by Dwight Schuh, and Woodcraft and Camping by George Washington Sears, and others. They're all good reads and I've gotten a lot out of them. Besides, you can go online and find thousands of resources as well (Youtube, forums, etc.).

    I started camping and hiking more last year and have really been enjoying it. The experience that I've gotten from each trip is really important, "experience is the best teacher," as they say. good luck and thank you for your service
    Last edited by Zack; 01-12-2017 at 07:13 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Being a survivalist/prepper means taking care of your self with, what you have....and what you can do to help your self.

    Congrats on taking steps for both learning and planing.......Many would just sit back and look for handouts.
    Agree with Kyrat about the second job and or school....sometimes it a PITA to get going but take hard work to get up that hill...

    I carry a compass..... as well as a map if I'm in new area.....But don't depend on grids, nice but not neccessary

    All I need to know is where I came from and which way I'm going ....and if necessary, which way back.
    Our home area is mostly all grid-ed with roads a mile square.....pretty easy.....but have been known to go wrong way in the evening...to find somebody moved the truck.
    My second favorite area roads go and down hills and where ever you are....if lost go down hill and find the road....now the only question is.....is it the right road.
    You can use sun and stars as well,.... but a compass makes things much easier, for a few bucks.....

    Actually carry 3, one in the pack (good one...for "navigation" ) one in pocket...and cheapo pinned to inside of coat.
    That way if I have a question as to if the compass is correct or not....compare it with the another...and if they disagree....number 3 settles the argument.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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  16. #16

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    one thing not on your list but should be is hygene.
    you know toilet paper, tooth brus, floss.wetwipes,barsoap
    poor sanitation can cause death, or severe illness,
    one of the true keys to survival is keeping clean,
    it's not tobe overlooked.
    as for the suckingwound patch, forget it . if you need a chest seal,
    then your already done for.
    as for trauma gear. don't carry anything your not trained to use.
    if you have a granular type hemostatic powder? dump it.
    get some qickclot gauze and a olaes bandage, youtube will show you
    how to use it.
    good luck. and welcome.
    coyotes listen to them, like children of the night what music they make.

  17. #17

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    Thank you for the information guys.

    Working on a hygene kit atm, making some soap from beef tallow.. well trying. If i can make it out of beef tallow i can make it out of any tallow right? Then i'll have a way to acquire soap through hunting and rendering of the fat.
    I've always had access to mullien, its softer than toilet paper and renewable since it's a common weed found all over the eastern woodlands. It's medicinal and the seeds can be harvested to make a fish poison.
    The sucking chest wound, not sure why i wrote that. Kinda obvious it's not possible in a self aid situation.
    I do want to acquire some quikclot though. One time i cut my foot open hiking barefoot, if i couldn't get to the hospital.. i'd be dead wouldn't i? Scary thought.
    Last edited by crashdive123; 03-11-2017 at 09:20 PM. Reason: Restored OP

  18. #18
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    Sorry, I am not going to answer your question very specifically. I don't think you know really what you are after.

    I do want to help you though. My advise is to use your GI bill and go to school. You don't have to go to college. Look at trade schools. Our country has a lot of jobs for people with trade skills. Heavy equipment operators (crane operators get paid a ton), machinists, electricians, plumbers, HVAC, etc. Maybe I listen to Mike Rowe too much. He says he keeps running into people who are hiring, but can't find anyone qualified or who wants the job. Most of the jobs are blue collar jobs that require some skill.
    I also think that if you are in New York, you might want to consider moving. Of course, there are probably a very large selection of trade schools there.
    From another Army Reservist...good luck!
    I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.
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  19. #19
    Senior Member Graf's Avatar
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    I believe you'll find the more dirt time you get the less you'll carry not because it's heavy or bulky but your knowledge and experience will take place of items. As others have said tarps are a must so multi purpose, cordage take along but also learn to make it, sissors, razors leave home, fire ash and water will help keep you clean, leave the lighter home the ferro rod is enough make some PJ cotton balls or use pine resin and shave bark for tinder,canteen kit with canteen cup and cover for pots will be enough. Use the tarp as shelter till you perfect your shelter building skills. Take Rat traps for small game for now along with your snare wire until you perfect your snaring skills. Guess what I'm saying is whatever you take now try to think of ways you would get by if you didn't have them.
    Last edited by Graf; 01-23-2017 at 05:00 PM.
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  20. #20
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Why are you reinventing the wheel? Soap is so cheap why mess with making it? As for me, I will hang on to the lighter. I will not rely on a single source for fire making when a lighter is so easy especially if you have cold fingers.

    It is rare to have the need for a hemostatic agent like QuikClot. Make no mistake, there is nothing better for an arterial bleed but knowing how to use a compression bandage is equally important and used far more often than a hemostatic agent.

    It sounds like you are building a kit just to build a kit. You need to decide first on what your threats are. Then you need to figure out what your skills are within those threats. Then you can build a kit to suit you not something someone has said.

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