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Thread: Tin Cloth Recipe

  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I don't know about twirl but if you spin the contents so that air enters the bottle it will empty faster. That's my preferred method. The fact that air enters and doesn't create an airlock is the reason it empties faster. Think of whirlpool inside the bottle.
    Well, I was going to accuse you of just messing with me, but I went and checked it just to make sure. I only had one kind of wine bottle (a Bordeaux type), and sure enough, it emptied faster with the whirlpool. I know I've had them empty faster by chugging, but that was with hot soapy water. That was when I noticed. That must make a difference. Viscosity, and all that. I checked with a smaller bottle (almost spherical) with a slightly wider mouth, and it emptied faster when it chugged.

    Never mind. I should've used another example, but I would probably be wrong with that, too. Like 2-litre bottle mosquito traps, or growing potatoes in a barrel.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Capt. James T. Kirk


  2. #82
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    Thank you KYRatShooter!
    This thread is exactly what I was looking for, and the reason I joined this forum.
    I like doing things myself, and I like saving money.
    I would love to own a pair of Filson tin pants, or tin chaps, but I will not spend that much money on something I can replicate myself. I did just buy a used Filson Mackinaw though, because I don't have a sewing machine, yet.
    Having done a lot of plumbing, I am quite familiar with wax bowl rings. I suppose it would be better to use a new ring, and not one scraped off an old removed toilet. Having removed some pretty old toilets, I can attest that the wax keeps its consistency over time.
    I happen to have on hand some neatsfoot oil. It is an animal product and not a plant product. It could be quite different than boiled linsead oil and an unsuitable alternative, or it could ruin the garment I'm trying to improve, or it could work marvelously.
    Does anyone have experience using neatsfoot oil in this capacity? Do I have to go first?
    I live in a somewhat remote part of Alaska. We are not on the road system. Pretty much everything is more expensive because it has to be shipped in. That is why I would like to use the neatsfoot oil I have.
    This summer I plan on spending a lot of time on a hill that some consider to be a mountain, developing a new rout to the top. I'll be doing a lot of bushwhacking in what will at times be wet dense brush. A good pair of tin pants will serve me well.

  3. #83
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Sure! You can use anything you want to, mix it in any ratio you want to and apply it any way you want to.

    It just won't work.

    There is a concept that so many people just do not understand, and that is that just because you have one thing, and not the proper ingredients, it does not mean that "it simply has to work".

    If you are in the middle of nowhere, with no access to anything, a tin of linseed oil should be as easy to acquire as a commode gasket. Probably the same store.

    If you can not afford a tin of linseed oil you have picked the wrong profession as a means of support.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  4. #84
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    Thanks for the response.
    Certainly you wouldn't say,
    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    It just won't work.
    Unless you tried it and know for sure that it won't work.
    Just like you certainly wouldn't say that something would work unless you tried it and know for sure that it does work.
    Did you try it?

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    a tin of linseed oil should be as easy to acquire as a commode gasket. Probably the same store.
    I acquired the "commode gasket" from my tote of plumbing stuff. I could drive the 15 miles (30 miles round trip) to the other end of the road where there is a hardware store, and see if they have linseed oil (they probably do) or I could order it from Amazon. Either way, that's not using what I have, but it is spending more money.

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    After a little research, the big difference I can find between boiled linseed oil and neatsfoot oil is that boiled linseed oil is a drying oil, while neatsfoot oil is not.
    It seems that this would dramatically change the results of this recipe. The end result might be a more oily and less waxy cloth.

  7. #87
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    Use the recipe posted. It works. Changing it will not. While some like to perform their own experiments, there really is no need to reinvent the wheel. Krats process was developed over time and it works.
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    This should be fun.

  9. #89
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamAK View Post
    Did you try it?
    You did not read post number one! Go back to page one and read post #1.

    "We don't need no stinkin' instructions!" does not apply here. Go back and read the instructions or you will hurt yourself!

    Yep I tried it.

    I turned a Banana Republic yuppie chore coat into something that is usable in the field. It is hanging on the rack by the front door and has been in use for a couple of years now, since back when I first posted the recipe. Long enough for the smell of the linseed oil to have worn off.

    I did a Sportsman's Guide safari jacket but I seldom wear it because is makes me look like something off Wild Kingdom and gives me the uncontrollable urge to carry my Enfield and wear a flap holster for my revolver.

    I did a boonie hat using beeswax instead of the commode ring and it makes my head sweat and it attracts bees.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 01-25-2019 at 09:21 PM.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    You did not read post number one! Go back to page one and read post #1.

    "We don't need no stinkin' instructions!" does not apply here. Go back and read the instructions or you will hurt yourself!

    Yep I tried it.

    I turned a Banana Republic yuppie chore coat into something that is usable in the field. It is hanging on the rack by the front door and has been in use for a couple of years now, since back when I first posted the recipe. Long enough for the smell of the linseed oil to have worn off.

    I did a Sportsman's Guide safari jacket but I seldom wear it because is makes me look like something off Wild Kingdom and gives me the uncontrollable urge to carry my Enfield and wear a flap holster for my revolver.

    I did a boonie hat using beeswax instead of the commode ring and it makes my head sweat and it attracts bees.
    I did read post number one! I read it a couple of times. I even copied it and saved it so I could read it again in the future.
    You said "It just won't work." Referring to any variation on your recipe, and specifically my simple question of "Does anyone have experience using neatsfoot oil in this capacity?"
    In your post number one, you seemed to really dislike it when people would say that something would work when in reality they never tried it and it in fact didn't work. So surely you dislike it when someone says that something doesn't work when in reality they haven't even tried it.
    My question to you was have you tried it, neatsfoot oil that is?
    You could have simply said "I tried that stuff but it doesn't work." or "I haven't tried that stuff but I doubt it would work" or, you could give me a detailed explanation as to why it wouldn't work. Or, if you don't "...have experience using neatsfoot oil in this capacity", you could have ignored the question.

  11. #91
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    Here is some good reading on why linseed oil would work so well for this.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linseed_oil

  12. #92

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    Tick tock....
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  13. #93
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    There is but one thing left to do. Try it and report back on your results.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I knew this was gonna be good. I need more popcorn. Who knew linseed oil was edible and who was the first guy that tried it? How hungry would you have to be to try it?

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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    It must be really bad in Alaska this winter! Reverse circular logic is in full swing.

    And you are completely correct that I should have ignored your initial post, you are simply an argument looking for a place to happen.

    William old boy there were a lot of combinations I did not try while experimenting.

    I did not try raw buggers and gasoline, or lard and the liquid drained out of wet wipe boxes, feel free to deal with those during your long boring darkness of Alaskan winter and get back to us after a couple months of effort.

    There were some more combinations I did try and they did not work, so using the decades of dealing with morons which makes up my life experience I decided not to post the failures so they would not be confused with the successes.

    It is your time and effort so have at it! You can also ignore the cautions about use of the double boiler if you feel they do not apply to you.

    And even if neetsfoot oil does magically work, though it is not a component used by any of the manufacturers that offer tin cloth, here in the lower 48 states it is 8x-10x the price of linseed oil which does work and does not require several months of experimenting to verify the results. Many combinations of chemical will look great after a week but rot the fabric after a few months.

    While we are waiting I will go and try to make some cornbread out of tofu which I am told tastes exactly the same, and see if the caution on the pump that says I should not use diesel in my Jeep is valid if all I have is diesel and it "just has to work".
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    It must be really bad in Alaska this winter! Reverse circular logic is in full swing.

    And you are completely correct that I should have ignored your initial post, you are simply an argument looking for a place to happen.

    William old boy there were a lot of combinations I did not try while experimenting.

    I did not try raw buggers and gasoline, or lard and the liquid drained out of wet wipe boxes, feel free to deal with those during your long boring darkness of Alaskan winter and get back to us after a couple months of effort.

    There were some more combinations I did try and they did not work, so using the decades of dealing with morons which makes up my life experience I decided not to post the failures so they would not be confused with the successes.

    It is your time and effort so have at it! You can also ignore the cautions about use of the double boiler if you feel they do not apply to you.

    And even if neetsfoot oil does magically work, though it is not a component used by any of the manufacturers that offer tin cloth, here in the lower 48 states it is 8x-10x the price of linseed oil which does work and does not require several months of experimenting to verify the results. Many combinations of chemical will look great after a week but rot the fabric after a few months.

    While we are waiting I will go and try to make some cornbread out of tofu which I am told tastes exactly the same, and see if the caution on the pump that says I should not use diesel in my Jeep is valid if all I have is diesel and it "just has to work".
    I assumed you went through some trial and error, and that you used a few different combinations that didn't work.
    I also assumed that you were somewhat of a teacher and experimenter. I also thought that you were someone that would want to understand why something would or wouldn't work, and wouldn't mind passing on your understanding.
    Now it seems that you just want people to blindly accept every word you write as the gospel truth, and consider you the final authority on every subject you write about.
    I started off being very impressed and thankful for your recipe. I feel differently now.
    Neatsfoot oil isn't a component used by any of the manufactures? Are toilet wax rings?
    From what I have read about linseed oil, I can see why it would work so much better than neatsfoot oil, or probably any other oil. As for cost, I ordered a gallon of linseed oil a few days ago, it's not any cheaper than neatsfoot oil. Shipping costs a lot out here.
    I would be happy to talk with you about fuels in internal combustion motors, and I won't insult you for asking questions.

  17. #97

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    Hey Rick. Do you have one of those 50# bags of popcorn, like you can get at Sam's Club/Costco? You might need it.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Capt. James T. Kirk

  18. #98
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  19. #99
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    If you have a paint brush with linseed oil on it and you don't clean it, it's gunna get hard as a rock. If you do the same with neatsfoot oil, it stays nice and soft and won't dry out. If you have linseed oil on a rag, it too will get hard and stiff. If you add a toilet bowl ring, it's not going to get so stiff. If you add the drying agent, it drys faster. The combinations are somewhat unknowns until experimentation, hence the recipe.
    If you enjoyed experimenting and you started with oils with similar drying characteristics of linseed oil such as tung oil or maybe even varnish or polyurathane you may get similar results. If you added an emulsifier such as lecithin, added water and used a blender you may end up with a usable cream. Even if you fill a five gallon bucket full of water and put some oil on top and dunk a rag in there and slosh it around you'll find it will be evenly covered with oil when it drys.
    It's not rocket science. You'll end up with an oiled cloth no matter what you do. It's just whether or not you're satisfied with it's dryness, flexibility and waterproof properties. Kyrat has stated that he questioned the advice he originally received and he is quite happy with a method of his own.
    As a side note: just keep in mind that linseed oiled rags tossed in a pile always catch on fire in time. It's kind of special that way. Also, linseed oil is oil from flax seed.

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    image.jpg
    I was at the other end of the highway today so I stopped in at the hardware store to see how much boiled linseed oil cost. $38 per gallon. What I ordered on Amazon was a bit less expensive.
    Imagine if neatsfoot oil was "8x-10x the price".

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