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Thread: Tin Cloth Recipe

  1. #61
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    You will need to do the remelt. That is the trick to making the finished tin cloth according to Filson company.

    It does not take long and you can do it with a hair dryer.

    I always cringe a little and hope the recipes work well for the folks that try them.

    My safari jacket turned out real well and I wore it a lot last year during spring/fall rains. The chore coat I have used around the house a lot doing things in the rain and snow during winter. It is very heavy!
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?


  2. #62

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    Oh, I was planning on following your instructions and doing the re-melt. It's just that I was expecting it to look lumpy, or something, so the re-melt would take that out. Once it actually dries, I'll probably see the variations that need smoothing.

    I'm not one of those people that will argue with you about your instructions when I've never done it myself. I might ask a lot of irritating questions, but they're out curiosity about the reasons for a given process, not a challenge to the validity of the process. "What is the reason for doing XXXXX?" not "Why the #@*% do you do that?"
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  3. #63
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    When I first started re-enactment I had to make all of my own gear and I was following the directions of people that were supposed to be the best in the "business". They had it all and had done it all. Now they were writing books for us newbies to use to duplicate their efforts.

    Most of the time their recipes did not work and I realized that they had really not done the process themselves or they would know that! They were repeating something someone told them across a campfire when both parties had a pint or two of rum in them.

    BTW, that process works real well on cheap rucksacks, turning a simple cloth bag in to what Deluth Traders charge a couple of hundred dollars for.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  4. #64

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    I'll guess I'll find out soon enough whether you were bullxxxxing, or not! ;o)

    Seriously, I've had that experience with several things I "learned" on the internet. 2-litre bottle mosquito killers, and potatoes in a barrel come to mind. I think they were posted by someone originally as a joke, and they keep getting copied and reposted by bloggers who had a slow day and needed material.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  5. #65

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    Well, it's been a week (8 days, actually), and the pants are definitely drier than they were. I'm going to wait until at least next weekend before doing the re-melt.

    Kyrat, you said you used one batch to do a thigh-length coat, with a little left over. I used one batch, with a little left over, to do a pair of pants. I think there is considerably less area on a pair of pants than on a coat. More than half, maybe, but not much more. So they may need to dry a while. This is the weather to do it, and there's no hurry because these things are cold weather clothing anyway.

    I'll keep you posted.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  6. #66

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    I've been looking into getting a #51 canoe pack from Duluth Pack, which they offer in waxed cotton canvas for $30 more. Upon reading their FAQ page on the material, and I quote "Our “Waxed Canvas” comes to us pretreated with paraffin, a petroleum based wax. The wax application is applied to the cotton fibers prior to being woven into actual canvas." Dope. EXCEPT that I have heard bad reviews of paraffin tin cloth (ie melting at low temps). So I want to try your recipe with beeswax (after first testing it out on something else of course!) BUT I was wondering if anyone has done this recipe on an item with leather and/or cotton straps. Will this damage/adhere to the straps? Do I need to take certain precautions? Thanks

    https://www.duluthpack.com/backpacks...1-utility.html

  7. #67
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I did a canvas coat that had leather trim collar and cuffs.

    You are going to be saturation painting the item with hot wax diluted with other chemicals heated to just below the boiling point, so yes, it is going to affect the leather and adhere to it. It will actually soak into and penetrate the leather.

    It did not "ruin" the leather trim on my coat but it did change it in texture and color. If the mixture is heavy on the wax percentage it will probably show as excess wax on the surface of the leather.

    If your Duluth pack is only $30 more for factory treatment I would pay the extra and get the treated pack and its warranty. The chemicals for the home brew solution are going to cost half that much at least and you have no chance of messing up the process.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  8. #68

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    Well, I finally got around to trying the "re-melt" step, and my freakin' Horrible Fright heat gun burned out on me. I guess I'll have to grab the blow dryer and finish it.

    It was the "Drill Master" brand, so I guess I should've expected it to fail. The DM cordless drills suck royally.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

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