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Thread: Tin Cloth Recipe

  1. #61
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    You will need to do the remelt. That is the trick to making the finished tin cloth according to Filson company.

    It does not take long and you can do it with a hair dryer.

    I always cringe a little and hope the recipes work well for the folks that try them.

    My safari jacket turned out real well and I wore it a lot last year during spring/fall rains. The chore coat I have used around the house a lot doing things in the rain and snow during winter. It is very heavy!
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?


  2. #62

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    Oh, I was planning on following your instructions and doing the re-melt. It's just that I was expecting it to look lumpy, or something, so the re-melt would take that out. Once it actually dries, I'll probably see the variations that need smoothing.

    I'm not one of those people that will argue with you about your instructions when I've never done it myself. I might ask a lot of irritating questions, but they're out curiosity about the reasons for a given process, not a challenge to the validity of the process. "What is the reason for doing XXXXX?" not "Why the #@*% do you do that?"
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  3. #63
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    When I first started re-enactment I had to make all of my own gear and I was following the directions of people that were supposed to be the best in the "business". They had it all and had done it all. Now they were writing books for us newbies to use to duplicate their efforts.

    Most of the time their recipes did not work and I realized that they had really not done the process themselves or they would know that! They were repeating something someone told them across a campfire when both parties had a pint or two of rum in them.

    BTW, that process works real well on cheap rucksacks, turning a simple cloth bag in to what Deluth Traders charge a couple of hundred dollars for.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  4. #64

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    I'll guess I'll find out soon enough whether you were bullxxxxing, or not! ;o)

    Seriously, I've had that experience with several things I "learned" on the internet. 2-litre bottle mosquito killers, and potatoes in a barrel come to mind. I think they were posted by someone originally as a joke, and they keep getting copied and reposted by bloggers who had a slow day and needed material.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  5. #65

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    Well, it's been a week (8 days, actually), and the pants are definitely drier than they were. I'm going to wait until at least next weekend before doing the re-melt.

    Kyrat, you said you used one batch to do a thigh-length coat, with a little left over. I used one batch, with a little left over, to do a pair of pants. I think there is considerably less area on a pair of pants than on a coat. More than half, maybe, but not much more. So they may need to dry a while. This is the weather to do it, and there's no hurry because these things are cold weather clothing anyway.

    I'll keep you posted.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  6. #66

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    I've been looking into getting a #51 canoe pack from Duluth Pack, which they offer in waxed cotton canvas for $30 more. Upon reading their FAQ page on the material, and I quote "Our “Waxed Canvas” comes to us pretreated with paraffin, a petroleum based wax. The wax application is applied to the cotton fibers prior to being woven into actual canvas." Dope. EXCEPT that I have heard bad reviews of paraffin tin cloth (ie melting at low temps). So I want to try your recipe with beeswax (after first testing it out on something else of course!) BUT I was wondering if anyone has done this recipe on an item with leather and/or cotton straps. Will this damage/adhere to the straps? Do I need to take certain precautions? Thanks

    https://www.duluthpack.com/backpacks...1-utility.html

  7. #67
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I did a canvas coat that had leather trim collar and cuffs.

    You are going to be saturation painting the item with hot wax diluted with other chemicals heated to just below the boiling point, so yes, it is going to affect the leather and adhere to it. It will actually soak into and penetrate the leather.

    It did not "ruin" the leather trim on my coat but it did change it in texture and color. If the mixture is heavy on the wax percentage it will probably show as excess wax on the surface of the leather.

    If your Duluth pack is only $30 more for factory treatment I would pay the extra and get the treated pack and its warranty. The chemicals for the home brew solution are going to cost half that much at least and you have no chance of messing up the process.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  8. #68

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    Well, I finally got around to trying the "re-melt" step, and my freakin' Horrible Fright heat gun burned out on me. I guess I'll have to grab the blow dryer and finish it.

    It was the "Drill Master" brand, so I guess I should've expected it to fail. The DM cordless drills suck royally.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  9. #69

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    Well, I finally finished the tin pants. I tried using a blow dryer for the re-melt, but the surface of the pants didn't change appearance AT ALL. It didn't with the heat gun either before it burned out. So, I just used the oven in the kitchen. I heated it to the lowest I could (170 F), and shut it off. I laid the pants zig zag on the two racks, closed it up, and turned the convect on for bit, without heat. I left them in for about 20 minutes, and they were nice and hot when they came out, so I'm sure they got above the 140 F that kyrat said was necessary.

    I'm not sure why my experience with this was different from kyrat described. The cloth never had a waxy sheen, or lumps, or even the appearance of wax in the roughness of the cloth. It didn't change color when heated, or change in appearance at all. I used the biggest Oatey brand wax ring that Lowe's had, but I didn't weigh it to see if it was five ounces. The Lowe's website says it weighs 0.5 lbs (8 oz.), but I don't think that's necessarily accurate. Next time, I'll use beeswax, and weigh it.

    I'll be doing a green Carhartt jacket next (who knows when), so I'll be fashionable, with matching pants and jacket, when I'm out working in the misty cold amongst the greenbriars.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  10. #70

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    I came across this video and it appears well researched. After applying my own formula on several garments that I'm quite happy with, I'll now have to try this new formula. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvZczKZfvF4

  11. #71
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    That is a phony video. No one that ever accomplished anything keeps their shop that clean.

    That's just plain perverted!
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    That is a phony video. No one that ever accomplished anything keeps their shop that clean.

    That's just plain perverted!
    I guess that means that I'm totally virtuous!
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  13. #73
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Me too.............
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  14. #74
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    My garage must be just this side of heaven. I'm thinking of submitting it for a superfund site. The only thing keeping me from it is if they select it they would actually come get some of my stuff and that would tick me off to no end.

  15. #75

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    Funny, I hadn't even noticed how clean it was. I figured it was a video studio, not a shop. Even so, I ordered my microcrystalline wax and I happened to just get done with a project where I bought a new can of tung oil, so I'm all set to try this new formula out.

  16. #76
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Another reinvention of the wheel.

    Since the two part formula works well, and has for more than a century, lets add six new ingredients and another couple of steps to the process, make it more expensive and complected and give everyone more ways to mess it up!

    Your mission in life is now accomplished.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  17. #77

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    I was wondering when you you were going to weigh in on this guy's recipe.

    Don't you know that changing things and making them complicated is the way to go?

    https://youtu.be/K1Lo-d8AWL0?t=1m52s
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  18. #78

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    Well, I actually watched the video now, and I have to say, at least this guy did something himself and didn't just parrot someone else.

    Parrots that haven't actually done anything are a pet peeve of mine. The example that comes to mind is people that commented on Wranglerstar when he was doing a winemaking video. Gobs of people said, "Twirl the bottle so that the water swirls on the way out. It'll empty faster that way." Anyone who has ever done this will know that it takes WAY longer (3, 4, or 5X longer) to empty a bottle this way.

    Anyway, his pants look like they're great, but are they really that much better? The amount of wax actually seems like an overkill.

    At least he didn't use turpentine, and he did the re-melt, eh kyrat? Although, it seems that doing before they dried is a bad idea. He even said he didn't want to evaporate stuff that needed to stay there. The only real problem I had was how dismissive he was of the old materials. The stuff he used is probably better (especially the wax), but that doesn't mean that beeswax and BLO are crap.

    BTW, kyrat, any ideas about the issues with mine? As a reminder, when I added the liquids to the melted wax, everything stayed liquid, and I never had any problem with it getting thick. It all soaked in, but the surface has never had a shiny, waxy appearance. I did the re-melt, but there wasn't anything on the surface to re-melt and even out.
    Last edited by JohnLeePettimore; 10-01-2018 at 01:04 PM.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  19. #79
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I don't know about twirl but if you spin the contents so that air enters the bottle it will empty faster. That's my preferred method. The fact that air enters and doesn't create an airlock is the reason it empties faster. Think of whirlpool inside the bottle.

  20. #80

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    Really didn't expect this to be dismissed so readily without even trying it. Didn't seem that complicated to me. I've coated several garments with my mix of beeswax, linseed oil and naptha, so I'll have a good basis of comparison to this one when I try it. I don't plan on doing both tung oils, just the one I have on hand along with the naptha I have and the wax. Three ingredients, just like the other formula and basically the exact same process to apply it. I must be missing something.

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