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Thread: Yucca?

  1. #1

    Default Yucca?

    Is this yucca?

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  2. #2
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Up here in Wisconsin, we do have Yucca, that most consider more or an ornamental.

    Had one in the front yard that looked like te one you posted.
    Didn't really try using it for anything....but then again, wasn't into "cordage", making shoes, etc....baskets at the time.

    Was very invasive,.... ended up digging it out.
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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Yup, looks to be.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca

    If you can find a dry stem that is not worm eaten it will make one of the best fire spindles you will every get your hands on.

    I once had a kid in a class I was teaching get a coal and take it to flame in less than a minute using a bow drill and a yucca stem.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 01-23-2016 at 09:37 PM.
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  4. #4

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    I've been able to use it as a hearth board to get a coal, but not a spindle. Could be I haven't found the right diameter for a spindle at least for a hand drill).

    As far as using it for the hand drill, I have only gotten smoke using horseweed as a spindle on the yucca, but no coal. However, the horseweed does make an ember on cedar.

    Today I used the leaves to make cordage (first time ever) and it did pretty good. I used it on a bow drill and made an ember using the stalk as a hearth board. It was entertaining, but the cordage broke after about three embers.



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  5. #5

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    Here is a picture of the set...

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    I'm impressed .......
    Guess I shouldn't have dug out the ones in the yard.....LOL
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  7. #7

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    A question I have is this: how long should I expect my cordage to last (using with a bow drill) assuming I am making it right?

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  8. #8

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    Yea that's yucca. Don't overlook its value as food also .

  9. #9

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    How do prepare it for food?

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  10. #10

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    The problem with eating yucca?
    You have to dig up the roots.
    Then, no more yucca. Well....at least for a few years and only if you missed a chunk of root.

    It's sort of like foragers digging up a whole stand of cattails for their roots just for one meal.
    No more cattails.
    Manage your foraging wisely.
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  11. #11
    Ed edr730's Avatar
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    Of course, not to be confused with yuca which is a different plant that you buy in the grocery store.

  12. #12

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    I think I heard you can eat the flowers, too. Is that correct?

    But back to my question of cordage; how long should I expect the yucca cordage to last? As I said earlier, mine broke after getting three embers. I don't expect it to last forever, but--assuming the cordage is made well--should it go longer (like possibly 10 embers)? What have you guys expwerienced?

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  13. #13
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goose View Post
    I think I heard you can eat the flowers, too. Is that correct?

    But back to my question of cordage; how long should I expect the yucca cordage to last? As I said earlier, mine broke after getting three embers. I don't expect it to last forever, but--assuming the cordage is made well--should it go longer (like possibly 10 embers)? What have you guys expwerienced?

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    In a survival situation, I would say the if it works once and last and last longer.......that's pretty good.....3 embers is excellent.
    Paracord last a long time......but you have to bring it with you.

    I would concern my self in having spare cordage made, or another source,.... that could replace what you had used.
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  14. #14

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    Flowers and roofs are eatable . The flowers are a little waxy for my taste. Do a web search for recipes .

  15. #15
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I do not think there is an official length of time a piece of yucca cordage is supposed to last.

    As a string for a fire bow it might last one ember, but after you get that ember you should not need another for an extended time while you sit by the fire and make all the yucca cordage you desire. We tend to think one should build a fire two or three times daily due to the ease of making fire with modern methods. Back in the day one built a fire and kept it going for weeks. I have kept fires going for the entire winter season and once kept the same fire going from October until April.

    Even the hunter gatherers preferred to carry coals when they could and our pioneer ancestors had small cast iron pots just for carrying coals from room to room, house to house, place to place.

    If you are using yucca cordage for shelter building it might last for years as binding for supports or lashings for poles.
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  16. #16

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    Thanks for all the feedback. I guess it makes since that it can't be expected to last long using it with a bow drill. I was wondering how well I was doing in making it, so I guess fairly well. Thanks again!

    And now, where's my shovel? Time to dig up some roots....

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  17. #17

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    Yeah, fires go out over night. There is usually plenty of coal. No, need to spin up another.

  18. #18
    Ed edr730's Avatar
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    I am interested in how well the pine roots work for you. You are becoming an authority on the subject.
    Another option for lashing and cordage is the outside, not inside, bark of a number of trees. It can be braided into a pretty rope or just stripped off the tree, for lashing, in long pieces. Not much trouble to make a 5-6 foot very strong rope or the same size or longer lashing. When you try to peel the bark off the tree and it comes off in one inch weak looking pieces you will think it's not possible, but it is and it's quite strong.

  19. #19

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    I haven't tried pine roots, but sounds like a good thing to try since pine trees are everywhere. I'm very new to making cordage so I have a ways to go. All tips are appreciated.

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  20. #20

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    As mentioned the fibers are certainly good for braiding good cordage. It also makes a surprisingly good soap substitute as it froths up. native americans would us it for this purpose

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