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Thread: Identification Assistance

  1. #1

    Default Identification Assistance

    I was wondering if anyone here could tell me what kind of plant and tree these are? Maybe the tree is some kind of fir, it has small blue berries. I'm not sure about the stalks. They are both native to eastern North Carolina. Thank you for any help!

    FullSizeRender.jpgIMG_3944.jpgIMG_3960.jpgIMG_3961.jpgIMG_3964.jpg


  2. #2
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I believe your tree is an eastern red cedar.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juniperus_virginiana

    They range across the southeast from Virginia to East Texas.

    I am not sure what the grass/weed you have there is even though I have been around it for my whole life. My grandfather called it sedge-grass.

    I miss my cedar trees and sedge-grass. I moved out of that climate zone.

    The juniper is the southern version of the birch. It's bark will shred and catch a spark for fire making and the dry, dead branches at the bottom of the tree (squaw wood) are excellent kindling. The bark and wood are full of rosin and the smell when that wood burns is hypnotizing.

    It is also an excellent insect repellent. Many fine custom closets and storage chests are made from or lined with red cedar to repel bugs and moths.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 12-29-2015 at 06:17 PM.
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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Actually I have had good luck checking in with the local Extension University......Seem the Prof like to give students a project.
    Call them on bug ID's as well.
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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Local agricultural agents are good resources too.

    Generally they will take a look at a local plant and spout off the specs on it off the top of their heads.

    What really throws them a loop is when you show up with an invasive species that scares them silly.
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  6. #6

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    That tall thing isn't a grass. It has the remains of floaters on it and is showing flower calyxes. Probably some kind of composite like horseweed.
    I'm not familiar with plants in that general area so can't help you out.
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