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Thread: Waterproof Backpacks

  1. #41
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    Default Cheap ideas on Goose Down

    Wool and alpaca are much better than down when wet due to loss of loft with down. But either way use of a rain resistant over jacket, tarp, or sleep bag cover etc. is wise. Materials similar to and improved over the old Gore Tex breath but are still water resistant unlike plastic which traps all your body's moisture. The human body is constantly transpiring moisture. Some very good articles have been written about this on backpacking/camping websites and magazines.

    Goose down jackets/sweaters and quilts/sleep bags are not necessarily super expensive. Just today I purchased a REI brand jacket for $3.93 ($4.25 after tax) at the Salvation Army Thrift store. Last year I bought one for $8. My friend got a North Face goose jacket used at a Thrift store for $10. These are fine for camping, may have a small barely noticeable stain but doesn't really matter. Goose down insulation lasts much longer than synthetic, just critical that you keep it dry or it will smell like a wet dog.

    Recently Costco had thin down quilts for $20. Just sew up the bottom and up the side about 1-2 feet and you have a great top quilt or sleeping bag liner or summer/spring sleeping bag (add zipper or velcro if you want, I don't for a hammock). Goose down compresses much smaller than synthetic or wool insulation. Also if you sleep in a hammock with a good ultra light tarp getting wet is not a concern, they are much dryer than sleeping on the ground. BUT keeping them dry is important! Some materials can breath and yet resist rain at the same time, plastic does NOT! This is helps with down and wool/alpaca both.
    Last edited by TXyakr; 09-30-2015 at 09:28 PM.


  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXyakr View Post
    Wool and alpaca are much better than down when wet due to loss of loft with down. But either way use of a rain resistant over jacket, tarp, or sleep bag cover etc. is wise. Materials similar to and improved over the old Gore Tex breath but are still water resistant unlike plastic which traps all your body's moisture. The human body is constantly transpiring moisture. Some very good articles have been written about this on backpacking/camping websites and magazines.

    Goose down jackets/sweaters and quilts/sleep bags are not necessarily super expensive. Just today I purchased a REI brand jacket for $3.93 ($4.25 after tax) at the Salvation Army Thrift store. Last year I bought one for $8. My friend got a North Face goose jacket used at a Thrift store for $10. These are fine for camping, may have a small barely noticeable stain but doesn't really matter. Goose down insulation lasts much longer than synthetic, just critical that you keep it dry or it will smell like a wet dog.

    Recently Costco had thin down quilts for $20. Just sew up the bottom and up the side about 1-2 feet and you have a great top quilt or sleeping bag liner or summer/spring sleeping bag (add zipper or velcro if you want, I don't for a hammock). Goose down compresses much smaller than synthetic or wool insulation. Also if you sleep in a hammock with a good ultra light tarp getting wet is not a concern, they are much dryer than sleeping on the ground. BUT keeping them dry is important! Some materials can breath and yet resist rain at the same time, plastic does NOT! This is helps with down and wool/alpaca both.
    In regards to smell how do you manage? Let the stuff air/drip dry or does it need more than that? I found a spanish site that seems to make Alpaca stuff but I sent an email to see what % is alpaca, my spanish is barely passable so they might be scratching their heads wondering wth I am talking about lol.

  3. #43
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    Alpaca fiber is hypoallergenic so you won't have any smell unless you fail to let it dry after being wet. The stuff I have I just let air dry overnight. I don't have anything so thick it won't dry by air drying it. If you are interested in alpaca try the alpaca fiber co-op. Their web site appears to be down at the moment so I'll link their Facebook page. They are good folks that I've dealt with many times. They will be happy to answer any questions you might have.

    https://www.facebook.com/Alpaca-Fibe...6166/timeline/

    Here's the website when it comes back online.

    www.afcna.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Alpaca fiber is hypoallergenic so you won't have any smell unless you fail to let it dry after being wet. The stuff I have I just let air dry overnight. I don't have anything so thick it won't dry by air drying it. If you are interested in alpaca try the alpaca fiber co-op. Their web site appears to be down at the moment so I'll link their Facebook page. They are good folks that I've dealt with many times. They will be happy to answer any questions you might have.

    https://www.facebook.com/Alpaca-Fibe...6166/timeline/

    Here's the website when it comes back online.

    www.afcna.com
    Thanks Rick. There is a local farm near me and the guy says their 100% alpaca blankets run $150 which seems pricey.

  5. #45
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    Alpaca is pricey no matter where you purchase it. That's not really a bad price however. I've seen alpaca blankets run 200+.

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    I have never noticed any smell in dryed out down, wool or alpaca materials. Best to use a quality dry bag/sack to keep them dry in the first place. Then perhaps a water resistant cover that breaths at least a little at night if nothing else cover to your foot section with large dry bag this is what rubs tent side or sticks out and gets wet first sometimes.

    If you are lucky and backpacking there MAY be time and sunshine in the morning to dry gear out. But often it is raining and I must move on with wet gear that smells like a wet dog and is heavy. Thus if humidity in side eVent bag is greater than outside some moist air will escape as I hike, but not much. Experiment with a wet cotton blanket at home see how it works or doesn't BEFORE your next backpacking trip.

    BTW purchased Alpaca sweaters/blanket at Quechua (former Incas) Market in Lima, Peru years ago it was fairly cheap there. Drove over Andes saw them herding the animals up there.

    Edit: One of many small Alpaca farmer/ranchers near me, look them up on Owners Associations, 4H, Extension Service, ask at local feed store etc. near you. Large hand woven rugs are expensive, but a small one works well as a under-quilt if you have a double layer hammock, use in-place of a inflatable pad, or on the ground in your tent/tarp. Add mylar space blanket if you need it but I prefer something that breaths naturally, does not trap condensation moisture.

    Tierra Prometida Alpaca Ranch is located about 15 miles west of San Marcos, TX

    http://www.alpacausa.com
    Last edited by TXyakr; 10-05-2015 at 08:19 AM. Reason: spelling, link to alpaca owner

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidlastink View Post
    In regards to smell how do you manage? Let the stuff air/drip dry or does it need more than that? I found a spanish site that seems to make Alpaca stuff but I sent an email to see what % is alpaca, my spanish is barely passable so they might be scratching their heads wondering wth I am talking about lol.
    Yes air dry, but do not hang it or it could stretch out of shape like a heavy wet wool sweater. Here is a good article also talks about low oil, hypoallergenic nature of the yarn, i.e. how it is different than sheep's wool.

    How to clean and care for Alpaca. (type of detergent to use etc.)
    http://blog.novica.com/how-to-clean-...paca-products/

    This link did not work well on my Android phone but fine on Apple MacBook computer not sure why.

    Personally I do not trust its natural water resistance, use a water shedding outer layer if there is heavy morning mist or rain/sleet/snow same with hydrophobic goose down.

    There are some people who raise Alpacas on various outdoor forums who may provide you with links to good North American suppliers. A good blanket, sweater, hat etc. if cared for properly should outlast a synthetic one many times over. Thus cost of ownership is about the same or less. IF YOU USE IT! and are actually an outdoors person, not just someone who car camps once or twice a year. I slept outside in my hammock last 3 weekends, was beside some rapids this past weekend listening to them all night. Very peaceful. Even the armadillos did not bother me much. Caught some LM and Guadeloupe bass. One Guadeloupe Bass was well over legal limit and very fat on 4 lb line, but I released all. Life is good! :-)
    Last edited by TXyakr; 10-05-2015 at 07:49 AM. Reason: link issues

  8. #48
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    Thanks Rick and Tx for info.

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    My first post here other than in the intro section.

    IME multiple smaller dry bags are more efficient the 1 large one in a pack, with different color bags denoting contents. If you have to open a bag in the rain you will see quickly why I like multiple bags. It keeps your gear organized, keeps only what you need dry, and doesn't monopolize your pack.

    With 1 large dry bag you are limited, why keep things dry that don't need to be like you pot, tarp etc
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    In a previous post near top I actually mentioned I use a color coded drybag system, but I want to be able to stuff my sleeping stuff or coat in a bag if fording or light rain etc and not have to worry about splashing or accidents slipping into water or seeping from rain etc.

  11. #51

    Default Which sleeping bag do you like for northeast?

    Quote Originally Posted by TXyakr View Post
    If you look into the indepth independent research that has been done on hydrophobic down (various brand names such as dri down) you will learn that the process to create its coating has made it resist initial water saturation but once it becomes wet it still looses its loft and thus its insulation and takes a very long time to dry out.
    It is a free world do whatever you want. But for myself I want a bag that has a good seal on the opening and high puncture resistance (pull bag out set on ground there can be many sharp rocks and sticks, and repeated use, long trip, the best garbage bag allows your finger to pop through) when I am in a very cold and wet environment, especially if I am traveling in an open canoe though rapids. If night time temperatures are well below freezing and rain and snow can last for days a few extra dollars is insignificant to me. Just my personal opinion based on real world experience, in northern Canada and many parts of the USA.
    Just joined today, so I hope I am using this forum correctly.
    Would really like to know what you like to use for a sleeping bag. I live in the Northeast and i'm new to prepping. I have read other forums where people prefer wool blankets over down. I know wool is heavy, but is safer around campfires. Value your opinion, thanks!

  12. #52
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    We have a great introduction section. You might want to go there and tell us about yourself.

    After that you could come back to the equipment section and start a separate thread about your sleeping bag needs.

    We have not had a good sleeping bag thread in a long time and it should be interesting.

    I have been looking for the perfect sleeping bag for 60 years. Have not found it yet!
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    We have not had a good sleeping bag thread in a long time and it should be interesting.

    I have been looking for the perfect sleeping bag for 60 years. Have not found it yet!
    Kinda like the best survival knife. I have several sleeping bags that are all different and perfect for different circumstances. And, I still have ideas for a better one in each of those circumstances. MinPin, start a new thread and we will discuss.
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    Quote Originally Posted by finallyME View Post
    K MinPin, start a new thread and we will discuss.
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  16. #56

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    I have an external frame Coleman that's waterproof. Good in the rain, bad for spills. Dumped a whole bottle of olive oil in the main pouch and it pooled there . Keeps my stuff dry. Bought it at the swapmeet for ten bucks. There is a lotta great hiking equipment sold in such places for highly discounted rates. Always brand new. Bought for the best of intentions, but then left to gather dust.

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