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Thread: Can you identify this plant ?

  1. #41
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    meh. if it's just a vine on it's own, and not connected to the trifolate leaves above it's probably either a Rubus or a Rosa, or something else alltogether.

    you really got me with that one. cheers.
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  2. #42
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    My mistake on the ivy. I took pictures of several plants and put the wrong one on. Good catch Canid! It sure is nice having the depth of experience that is present in this forum.

  3. #43
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Let's see...
    Last edited by rebel; 05-05-2009 at 09:54 PM.

  4. #44
    Man Scout Omid's Avatar
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    It is ferns covered with a white moss or fungi or something. It sorta looks like this thing that destroyed one of my tomato plants (I forgot what it was called).

  5. #45
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    More poison ivy with freshly budding leaves.
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  6. #46
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Canid - That's exactly why I only stick to a couple of mushrooms. I have no idea. I can't even offer a guess. Neither look like anything in my guide. I'll be interested know what they are so I can go back and look them up and see why they don't look the same.

  7. #47
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I don't have a non-edible guide for Rebel's last post. I don't think it's an ivy based on the leaf cluster to the far right. It looks like five in the cluster. Without flowers, my edible guide is useless.

    If that's actually two leaves together then I'll go with an ivy. Everything else looks right.

  8. #48
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Oops. Right you are - not a three cluster.
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  9. #49
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    that is Hydnum [= Dentinum ] repandum, the hedgehog fungus and Boletus barrowsii, the white king bolet.
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  10. #50
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Well, no wonder I can't identify it. Neither one is in my guide. I have a number of Hydnum and Boletus listed but not those specific ones. Good pics by the way.

  11. #51
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    the white king bolete is almost identical to B. edulis, except for the white color, and was once considered a subspecies of the same. is is a bit less common, but easier to spot in the woods

    the Hyndum repandum is the classic hedgehog mushroom, though it is only well known and popular in some regions. it is incredible. it will be listed in older [and even some newer] field guides as Dentinum repandum.
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  12. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Not mint for the first one.

    I'm going to put you out of your misery. As I said, it's a bit tougher. It's Toothwart. These guys grow everywhere in the Midwest. You can find lower woodlands just covered in it. The roots can be grated and prepared like horseradish.
    I was going to guess garlic mustard...

  13. #53
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    Heres one for you, commonly found in the UK and N. America.

    What it commonly known as, is it edible and on what tree is it often found?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #54
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'll take a shot at Ganoderma Tsugae. Yes, it's edible when it first forms. It will be found on Eastern Hemlock and some other conifers.

    Close?

    It could be also be a Fistulina Heptica

  15. #55
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    No to the the first guess but it is edible.

    Your second guess is correct i think, im not 100% on the Latin name but over here we call it beefsteak fungus on account of it appearing like a slab of meat especially when its young (it even bleeds red when you cut it!). I don't know about the Eastern Hemlock to be honest, but over here its most frequently found on oaks (dead or alive).

  16. #56
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    Wow, I think I saw some of that the other day. How do you prepare it for edibility?

  17. #57
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    I haven't eaten those myself, i just used to find them and sell them to my mothers boyfriend (50p each which seemed like a good deal in my early teens!). What i do know is that you need to remove the hard base first and that its probably best to soak them in water for a while, i have found a recipe for you here - http://www.foodiesite.com/recipes/2002-10:bfsteakfungus

    That follows the idea of soaking but suggests white wine in order to marinade it.

    The appearance varies greatly depending on age, the young ones can look very moist and fleshy, and any found on moss are quite an amazing red colour.

  18. #58
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Okay, here's an important question. Is your mother's boyfriend still with us?

  19. #59
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    Yes and very fit and healthy he is for a guy his age (he works outdoors - aboricultural work). Hes a big fan of mushrooms, when we went picking we usually after boletus as they are his favourites and had to of course be careful as theres a very poisonous variety that can be hard to identify as it can only have a subtle blue tinge to the flesh sometimes.

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Okay. I went out today looking for Morels (skunked on those by the way) and took the camera. This one is a bit tougher but pretty common in the Midwest. I thought I had taken a better pic of the flower but it has five petals and is white. You can find these as solitary plants or spread out, almost carpet like. They only bloom in this time of year. The third pic is a large area of them.
    I've always called it garlic mustard. Basal leaves are edible and palatable in early spring.

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