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Thread: Can you identify this plant ?

  1. #1
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Default Can you identify this plant ?

    Is it edible?

    If it is edible, how would you prepare it?
    Last edited by rebel; 05-05-2009 at 09:54 PM.


  2. #2
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Hint: This plant is in it's infancy stage.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'm tempted to say Fiddle Fern (Ostrich Fern) but frankly I've never seen the fuzzy stuff on them.
    Last edited by Rick; 04-30-2008 at 10:17 AM.

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    Fiddleheads, they are fern frond. We put up close to 100 lbs a year. As far as I know all fiddleheads are OK to eat although some are not as good as others. You do have to get most of the brown papery stuff off and they have to be cooked to to destroy something in them(don't remember what the stuff is called). We steam them and eat them with vinaigrette sauce. We also dry a lot for winter greens. Fiddleheads are the first green of the season for many Alaskans. If you are in doubt check with the local Extension Service.

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    Put me down for Fiddle Back Fern, good battered and fried. I too have never seen it with that white mold looking stuff.

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    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Your right, fiddlehead and I don't know about the fuzz. You win the prize. Would you like to post the next plant picture? I can as I have time.
    Last edited by rebel; 04-30-2008 at 10:25 AM.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Okay. I went out today looking for Morels (skunked on those by the way) and took the camera. This one is a bit tougher but pretty common in the Midwest. I thought I had taken a better pic of the flower but it has five petals and is white. You can find these as solitary plants or spread out, almost carpet like. They only bloom in this time of year. The third pic is a large area of them.
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    The leaves look like wild grapes, but I never seen em flower like that before

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    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    My initial guess is a berry plant. I'll try Thimbleberry.

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    now I was hoping for a pic of those big shrooms you guys have over in Indiana.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Not grapes and not berries. In fact, it's not even a fruit.

    If it's big shrooms you want, it's big shrooms you'll get. What kind are they? Here's a hint. They are growing on an old elm.
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    Speaking of large fungi - I had to inspect an old abandoned home a while back. This was growing through a seam in the kitchen floor.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I would bet your life that it's a shell. Panus Conchatus.

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    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Okay. I went out today looking for Morels (skunked on those by the way) and took the camera. This one is a bit tougher but pretty common in the Midwest. I thought I had taken a better pic of the flower but it has five petals and is white. You can find these as solitary plants or spread out, almost carpet like. They only bloom in this time of year. The third pic is a large area of them.
    A nettle???

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Nope. Think condiment. That's the use. (it's not something in your kitchen but something you can use in the wild).

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    While you work on that plant AND the mushroom, I'll give you an easy one.
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    only thing i can think of is mint but mint dosent flower dose it......

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    Not mint for the first one.

    I'm going to put you out of your misery. As I said, it's a bit tougher. It's Toothwart. These guys grow everywhere in the Midwest. You can find lower woodlands just covered in it. The roots can be grated and prepared like horseradish.

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    Chives for the third

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    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Not mint for the first one.

    I'm going to put you out of your misery. As I said, it's a bit tougher. It's Toothwart. These guys grow everywhere in the Midwest. You can find lower woodlands just covered in it. The roots can be grated and prepared like horseradish.
    That was my next answer...yea right! Toothwart? I've never heard of it and maybe now I will not forget.

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