Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31

Thread: Have “bugging out” questions please help

  1. #1
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default Have “bugging out” questions please help

    I’m in a one-bedroom apartment in a large metro area and, therefore, I’m currently planning on “hunkering down” when SHTF. Considering that daily traffic is almost grid-lock during rush hours as it is, I know major highways will be parking lots in the event of an emergency situation. Plus we’ve had issues of road-rage here so that is another reason to avoid the highways when SHTF. So I am slowly but surely putting back food, water and other supplies for myself and two grandchildren that I want to be prepared for, just in case. I am also planning a small indoor garden to supplement our diet with.

    With that much said, I am also well aware that nothing in life goes exactly as we have planned it, so I want to be prepared for any eventuality. I have a couple of dilemmas though that I could use some advice on. Any advice, correction, or ideas will be most welcome and definitely appreciated.

    First, what conditions do I look for to know when it’s time to “get out of Dodge” BEFORE the crowds are on the move??

    Next, I’d like to eventually find some people who may also be alone and would like to form a community of like-minded preppers. I’m not particularly good at trusting people so what characteristics would I be looking for to join/form such a community?? If there are already such communities could someone please direct me where to look for them??

    Now for the “bugging out” part. In the event that I end up being responsible for two grandchildren would it be feasible to take a backpack as well as a rolling suitcase filled with supplies?? This would probably end up being a “camping” situation for myself and both grandchildren, unless I find a community to join. So other than food, water, a tent, sleeping bags what would you suggest I plan to take?? PLEASE be specific but also keep in mind the budget is a major consideration. Any list of supplies someone cares to offer will be most appreciated.

    Yes, I will have self-protection and won’t hesitate to use it especially if I have my grandchildren at home or in toe.

    Now PLEASE tear this apart, add any advice you care to, and just in general get me on the right track here. I thank anyone and everyone who cares to respond and offer advice.


  2. #2
    Senior Member MrFixIt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bogart, GA
    Posts
    1,092

    Default

    Where do you plan to bug out to? Have you actually walked there with a pack full of gear?
    As far as supplies, consider any medications you or your grandchildren may need, plus diapers (if needed).
    What type of first aid experience do you have?

    Just a few quick initial thoughts/questions....
    When all else fails, read the directions, and beware the Chihuahuacabra!

  3. #3
    Not a Mod finallyME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    4,227

    Default

    When thinking about bugging out, there are so many possibilities, sometimes it gets hard to narrow anything down. My plan is to put it into tiers. Tier 1 is barebones basic. It is a SMALL bag that I carry absolute necessities. Then comes the larger bag that carries more "nice" things. After that, it is in the vehicle. I have young kids, so I try to get them all a small pack that carries something. Then I put the rest in my big bag.
    I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/FinallyMe78?feature=mhee

  4. #4
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    KY bluegrass region-the center of the universe
    Posts
    10,117

    Default

    Do you own land in some other place which you are traveling too?

    If you have no secure final destination that offers stability and security your "bug out" is not a "bug out" it is a "run for your life".

    What do they call a grandpa, valiantly attempting to escape chaos and terror, with two grandkids in tow and everything they own in a wheelbarrow?

    A refugee.

    One of the key faults of the "survivalist movement" has been the fable that one can run off into the woods with only a backpack and live for an indefinite period like the "noble savage".

    Good luck with that! Especially if you have children with you, are advancing in age, or have winter settling in.

    Seems these "bug out" scenarios are more frequent in summer, when folks forget that only a month ago they would have frozen to death on their first night on the run.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  5. #5
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    44,159

    Default

    First, I would recommend starting with at threat assessment. In other words - figure out what is most likely to happen. List everything that could happen (blizzards, wild fires, flooding, earthquakes, civil unrest, terrorism, train derailment, tornadoes, hurricane and on and on) and give them a ranking. Prepare for what is ranked highest, or most likely. You will find that in preparing, your actions or preps will overlap into many other areas.

    For bugging out - again - have a plan. For example.......weather related events are high on my list. It is not my intention to bug out to the woods should it become necessary to leave because of a weather event. My plan is have a list of hotels/motels that are out of the path of the storm and make reservations (rather than leaving to chance that they have a vacancy) and head there.

    Most events that cause us to hunker down or bug out are not very long in duration. 24 hours or less is probably the majority of them. In some cases it may take longer to regain services (power and water). We've seen examples of civil unrest lately, none of which lasted longer than a few days.
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  6. #6

    Default

    Tough questions. Good questions coming back at you. You need a place to go if you bug out. Bugging in in the city is very iffy. Water goes off? Then what? Young kids will slow your roll. Older kids can be an asset. I agree with Crash. Risk assessment. Start to prepare for the most likely disaster and go from there. Say the electiricity goes off and you need to cook some food and get the kids' water for 72 hours. Build from there.

  7. #7
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    57,976

    Default

    +1 on the assessment. Here's a list to help you decide from most likely to least likely. Some may not apply and you might think of some others.

    Biological Threat: A biological attack is the deliberate release of germs or other biological substances that can make you sick. Many agents must be inhaled, enter through a cut in the skin or be eaten to make you sick. Some biological agents, such as anthrax, do not cause contagious diseases. Others, like the smallpox virus, can result in diseases you can catch from other people.

    Chemical Threat: A chemical attack is the deliberate release of a toxic gas, liquid or solid that can poison people and the environment.

    Dam Failure: A dam failure or levee breach is a catastrophic event characterized by the sudden, rapid, and uncontrolled release of impounded water.

    Earthquakes: An earthquake is the sudden, rapid shaking of the Earth, caused by the breaking and shifting of subterranean rock.

    Explosion: A release of mechanical, chemical or nuclear energy in a sudden and often violent manner with the generation of high temperature and usually with the release of gases.

    Extreme Heat: An extended period of high temperatures often accompanied by high humidity.

    Fire: A state, process or instance of combustion in which fuel or other material is ignited and combined with oxygen, giving off light, heat, and flame.

    Flood: Refers to the overflowing of normally dry areas, often after heavy rains. Flood is usually applied to the overflow of a great body of water, as, for example, a river, although it may refer to any water that overflows an area.

    Hazardous Material: Any substance or mixture of substances having properties capable of producing adverse effects on the health and safety or the environment of a human being.

    Hurricane: A severe tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    Influenza Pandemic: A pandemic is a global disease outbreak. An influenza pandemic occurs when a new influenza A virus emerges for which there is little or no known immunity in the human population and the virus begins to cause serious illness and then spreads easily person-to-person worldwide.

    Landslide/Debris Flow: Landslides, also known as mudslides and debris flows, are the downward falling or sliding of a mass of soil, detritus or rock on or from a steep slope. They can be caused by a variety of factors including earthquakes, storms, and fires.

    Nuclear Threat: An explosion with intense light and heat, a damaging pressure wave and widespread radioactive material that can contaminate the air, water and ground surfaces for miles around. An event typically recognized with an attack by a foreign power.

    Nuclear Power Plant Emergency: An accident comprised by the release of radioactive material from the plant into the environment, usually characterized by a plume (cloud-like formation) of radioactive gases and particles. The major hazards to people in the vicinity of the plume are radiation exposure to the body from the cloud and particles deposited on the ground, inhalation of radioactive materials, and ingestion of radioactive materials.

    There are two “emergency planning zones” in the event of an accident. One zone covers an area within a 10-mile radius of the plant, where it is possible that people could be harmed by direct radiation exposure. The second zone covers a broader area, usually up to a 50-mile radius from the plant, where radioactive materials could contaminate water supplies, food crops, and livestock.

    Radiation Threat: A radiation threat, commonly referred to as a "dirty bomb" or "radiological dispersion device (RDD)", is the use of common explosives to spread radioactive materials over a targeted area. It is not a nuclear blast. The force of the explosion and radioactive contamination will be more localized.

    Terrorism: The unlawful use or threatened use of force or violence by a person or an organized group against people or property with the intention of intimidating or coercing societies or governments, often for ideological or political reasons.

    Thunderstorm: A transient storm of lightning and thunder, usually with rain and gusty winds, sometimes with hail or snow, produced by cumulonimbus clouds.

    Tornado: A localized, violently destructive windstorm occurring over land, esp. in the Mid-West, and characterized by a long, funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the ground and made visible by condensation and debris.

    Tsunami: Tsunamis, also known as seismic sea waves, are enormous waves caused by an underground disturbance such as an earthquake or volcanic eruption. They can move hundreds of miles per hour and hit land with waves topping 100 feet in height.

    Volcano: A vent in the earth's crust through which lava, steam, ashes, etc., are expelled, either continuously or at irregular intervals.

    Wildfire: Any large fire that spreads rapidly and is hard to extinguish.

    Winter Storm or Extreme Cold: a severe winter condition characterized by low temperatures, strong winds, and heavy blowing snow.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    S.W. Idaho, USA
    Posts
    910

    Default

    How old are your grandchildren?

    As Kyratshooter said,
    "What do they call a grandpa, valiantly attempting to escape chaos and terror, with two grandkids in tow and everything they own in a wheelbarrow?

    A refugee.

    One of the key faults of the "survivalist movement" has been the fable that one can run off into the woods with only a backpack and live for an indefinite period like the "noble savage".

    Good luck with that! Especially if you have children with you, are advancing in age, or have winter settling in."
    Might be better to prepare to try and "bug in" with the grandkids and wait it out.

    S.M.
    "They that can give up essential liberty to gain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

    - Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790),U.S. statesman, scientist, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

  9. #9
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    57,976

    Default

    I try to prepare for natural events and my plan is to shelter in place. However, there are a number of instances that would make that impossible. An evacuation based on any number of scenarios (meth lab, industrial accident, rail or highway accident involving chemicals, etc) would make bugging out a necessity. It's one thing to say I'll stay put but when that green cloud of chlorine gas leaking from the local swimming pool is heading toward you it might be best to start driving.

  10. #10
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    26,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RkyMntPrepper View Post
    I’m in a one-bedroom apartment in a large metro area and, therefore, I’m currently planning on “hunkering down” when SHTF. Considering that daily traffic is almost grid-lock during rush hours as it is, I know major highways will be parking lots in the event of an emergency situation. Plus we’ve had issues of road-rage here so that is another reason to avoid the highways when SHTF. So I am slowly but surely putting back food, water and other supplies for myself and two grandchildren that I want to be prepared for, just in case. I am also planning a small indoor garden to supplement our diet with.

    With that much said, I am also well aware that nothing in life goes exactly as we have planned it, so I want to be prepared for any eventuality. I have a couple of dilemmas though that I could use some advice on. Any advice, correction, or ideas will be most welcome and definitely appreciated.

    First, what conditions do I look for to know when it’s time to “get out of Dodge” BEFORE the crowds are on the move??

    What exactly do you have in mind that you consider the biggest threat....or What "S" do you think is going to happen?

    How long do you expect your put by food and supplies I going to last in the current location.....even with a "small indoor garden?"

    Next, I’d like to eventually find some people who may also be alone and would like to form a community of like-minded preppers. I’m not particularly good at trusting people so what characteristics would I be looking for to join/form such a community?? If there are already such communities could someone please direct me where to look for them??

    Most all of the "Like minded folks to band together"...Involve you putting up your money, supplies, and work in return for "their" location and rules.....So your finances and labor will be required.
    Unless it is a long standing group of family, friends, or neighbors.....


    Now for the “bugging out” part. In the event that I end up being responsible for two grandchildren would it be feasible to take a backpack as well as a rolling suitcase filled with supplies?? This would probably end up being a “camping” situation for myself and both grandchildren, unless I find a community to join. So other than food, water, a tent, sleeping bags what would you suggest I plan to take?? PLEASE be specific but also keep in mind the budget is a major consideration. Any list of supplies someone cares to offer will be most appreciated.

    What equipment do you currently have?....and grand kids have how much experience?


    Yes, I will have self-protection and won’t hesitate to use it especially if I have my grandchildren at home or in toe.

    Now PLEASE tear this apart, add any advice you care to, and just in general get me on the right track here. I thank anyone and everyone who cares to respond and offer advice.
    Just a few comments......Good luck.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

  11. #11
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default Thank You for your thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by MrFixIt View Post
    Where do you plan to bug out to? Have you actually walked there with a pack full of gear?
    As far as supplies, consider any medications you or your grandchildren may need, plus diapers (if needed).
    What type of first aid experience do you have?

    Just a few quick initial thoughts/questions....
    Yes, I have the medicines covered as well as first-aid supplies. Been to the bug out location but hadn't done so with full pack. I will definitely do that. Thank you

  12. #12
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Seniorman View Post
    How old are your grandchildren?

    As Kyratshooter said,

    Might be better to prepare to try and "bug in" with the grandkids and wait it out.

    S.M.
    The more I read of the ideas and suggestions people have offered here the more I'm realizing I have MUCH to do before "bugging out" is a realistic possibility. So for now I think the "bugging out" will remain a last ditch effort.

  13. #13
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The People's Republic of Illinois
    Posts
    9,449
    Blog Entries
    36

    Cool Well...

    Quote Originally Posted by RkyMntPrepper View Post
    The more I read of the ideas and suggestions people have offered here the more I'm realizing I have MUCH to do before "bugging out" is a realistic possibility. So for now I think the "bugging out" will remain a last ditch effort.
    It depends on the situation. It's always wise to plan for both contingencies....
    SARGE
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
    Albert Einstein

    Proud father of a US Marine....SEMPER FI!

    They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin

  14. #14
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by madmax View Post
    Tough questions. Good questions coming back at you. You need a place to go if you bug out. Bugging in in the city is very iffy. Water goes off? Then what? Young kids will slow your roll. Older kids can be an asset. I agree with Crash. Risk assessment. Start to prepare for the most likely disaster and go from there. Say the electiricity goes off and you need to cook some food and get the kids' water for 72 hours. Build from there.
    Thank You for the suggestions. I have supplies now but will definitely be adding to them and I want to be ready for moderately long term. I thank you for the suggestions though, it definitely gave a clearer picture and will be a big help.

  15. #15
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Rick,

    I've tried to do some of this risk assessment but this list is so much more extensive. I'm going to go through it item by item and then go from there on the SHTF supplies. Than You!!!

  16. #16
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by finallyME View Post
    When thinking about bugging out, there are so many possibilities, sometimes it gets hard to narrow anything down. My plan is to put it into tiers. Tier 1 is barebones basic. It is a SMALL bag that I carry absolute necessities. Then comes the larger bag that carries more "nice" things. After that, it is in the vehicle. I have young kids, so I try to get them all a small pack that carries something. Then I put the rest in my big bag.
    That is a good idea. I hadn't thought of everything being in tiers but that would definitely make planning easier. From some of the suggestions though I'm beginning to realize I am not ready for "bugging out" yet. I have more to do for "bugging in". I want to have "bugging out" supplies just in case but I think I'd be further ahead on concentrating for a few more "hunker down" situations.

  17. #17
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Thank You Everyone who offered suggestions and concrete ideas here. I'm realizing I'm on the right track by planning to "bug in" but at the same time I need to be ready for anything so some plans must go into "bugging out". Before I get there though, and feel comfortable with my plans, I need to do some more prepping and planning. Wow, I've got my work cut out for me. Wow, I'm really glad I posted this article, it has opened my eyes to some things. Thanks Everyone!!!!

  18. #18
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    57,976

    Default

    Some of the threats might seem a bit out there. Nuclear Power Plant Emergency, for example, might seem a bit extreme for someone that doesn't have a nuclear reactor in their state. However, there are 16 in the state west of me and they are all upwind of me. So be sure to research each of them so you don't overlook one that might be a potential threat.

  19. #19
    Junior Member RkyMntPrepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rocky Mountain region
    Posts
    22

    Default Thank You Rick

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Some of the threats might seem a bit out there. Nuclear Power Plant Emergency, for example, might seem a bit extreme for someone that doesn't have a nuclear reactor in their state. However, there are 16 in the state west of me and they are all upwind of me. So be sure to research each of them so you don't overlook one that might be a potential threat.
    I hadn't thought of this - but it would definitely be worth the time and effort spent to investigate and then plan for such eventuality.Hey thanks!!!

  20. #20
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The People's Republic of Illinois
    Posts
    9,449
    Blog Entries
    36

    Cool Also...

    Then there are the F.A.R.T.s; beware the one with the hong!....
    SARGE
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
    Albert Einstein

    Proud father of a US Marine....SEMPER FI!

    They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •