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Thread: a time before bullets.

  1. #1

    Default a time before bullets.

    A long time ago there were just sticks and stones then man learned to flint knap.
    he learned to make knives, spears and stone clubs and Atlatls. and for thousands
    of years they served man quite well. today there seems to ba a resurgence in
    learning the old ways of ancient weaponry.from flint knapped knivesto long bows and
    yes crossbows as well.these weapons put much game on the roasting pit before their
    were pots and pans.i have noticed that many not all here have the experience and passion
    to build such things and that is great. it will be a learning curve indeed for those who do not
    possess the knowledge to make thier own hunting gear. myself i,ve still yet to make a bow.

    i own quite a few but that,s not the point i,ve yet to learn to build my own there in lies
    the deal. one must learn to do those things . one day probably not in our life times who knows.
    that there will be no more bullets at best MABEY black powder who knows. i just think it a good thing
    to pass on all the skills we possess in aboriginal weapon making to the younger genorations while
    were still able. knowledge in survival is trully priceless.


  2. #2
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    So we are in a decent into the stone age?

    We will lose all memory, knowledge and record of how to produce and maintain a technology base?

    And our children will be so stupid we can not teach them how to smelt metal, build generators, machine engine blocks, make cell phones or build a firearm and the ammunition it needs?

    Is it 2012 again?
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

  3. #3
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    A worthy hobby for some people.....
    Good to know how to collect materials, make and use tools primitive tools.

    Not for everyone.
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  4. #4

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    krat this post is not meant to be any kind of post this or that.
    more of a history and learning thing.

  5. #5
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    You did say "one must learn to do those things". Personally, I have no interest in making weapons. It's not something I want to do. And I doubt Winchester, Remington, Federal and the rest will go softly into that good night. Nor will we nor the NRA allow it.

  6. #6

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    as i said this may not be in OUR lifetime but our childrens lifetime.
    as for the NRA that,s political and belongs in the political thread.

  7. #7
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Sorry, there is nothing political about mentioning the NRA. Maybe I should have left it with "we" since I am the NRA.

  8. #8
    Senior Member DSJohnson's Avatar
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    Dang it Rick your "Rep" parameters won't let me give you "REP" for that last post but Thank you!

  9. #9

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    I would be more interested in learning to improvise firearms. Black powder is easy enough, but I have never made a muzzle loader, let alone my own cartridges.

    Given the chance, I would try to skip the stone age...

  10. #10
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Once more we are dealing with the difference between wilderness survival and an apocalyptic survival scenario.

    In the real world, rescue is going to be effected before one can make a good bow or chip a stone point for it, or even before the need for the bow arises. Such need being mitigated by proper prior planning in the first place.

    https://gis.e-education.psu.edu/site...l_20130502.pdf

    Approximately 93% of SAR missions are completed within 24 hours, with 50% completed within 3 hours and 81% taking between 3 to 12 hours to complete (Koester 2008). As missions exceed 24-hours survival rates decrease, for example to 38% for children aged 4-6 years and to 76% for hikers (Koester 2008). Without the ability to respond to SAR incidents, these fatalities would be 20% higher (Heggie and Amundson 2009).

    We keep enduring these attempts at being dragged into these long term apocalyptic situations where the desire for the return of the "Noble Savage" dominates rather than common sense or fact.

    Making stone tools is a nice hobby and an excellent study, but its use as a survival skill can be eliminated by even the most basic shred of planning before one walks out the door of the house on his way to the woods.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 04-13-2015 at 10:17 AM.
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  11. #11
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    And a simple look at the world's mega disasters show just how quickly man bounces back. Our desire to remain within our comfort zone is also what drives our return to normalcy...whatever that is in that location.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    Once more we are dealing with the difference between wilderness survival and an apocalyptic survival scenario.

    In the real world, rescue is going to be effected before one can make a good bow or chip a stone point for it, or even before the need for the bow arises. Such need being mitigated by proper prior planning in the first place.

    https://gis.e-education.psu.edu/site...l_20130502.pdf


    Approximately 93% of SAR missions are completed within 24 hours, with 50% completed within 3 hours and 81% taking between 3 to 12 hours to complete (Koester 2008). As missions exceed 24-hours survival rates decrease, for example to 38% for children aged 4-6 years and to 76% for hikers (Koester 2008). Without the ability to respond to SAR incidents, these fatalities would be 20% higher (Heggie and Amundson 2009).

    We keep enduring these attempts at being dragged into these long term apocalyptic situations where the desire for the return of the "Noble Savage" dominates rather than common sense or fact.

    Making stone tools is a nice hobby and an excellent study, but its use as a survival skill can be eliminated by even the most basic shred of planning before one walks out the door of the house on his way to the woods.
    Wow, what an awesome response. We teach (from local stats) rescue within 72 hours. However we also teach primitive, expediant and modern, for ALL survival subjects. The sad fact is most people who need rescue in the wilderness (besides medical emergencies) are either low skilled and ill prepared people, or the 'extreme' end of the skill set who push themselves too far. You'd be surprised how many bushwalkers we get, who can't use a compass or read topos. It is quite often after they have experienced getting caught out, ill prepared, that they come on a survival course. We teach that there will be a 'crossover' to long term survival after those 72 hours, therefore skills like hunting and trapping, come into play. There was a case recently of a Dad with 2 sons, who got their 4wd bogged on a remote property, and they were stuck for 11days. Fortunately they stayed with their vehicle, and were found. They had run out of food after 3 days, and just drank rain water from puddles. They were smart staying put. Recently in the past couple of months there were also deaths of individuals who tried to walk back to homesteads and died (no water).
    So many people never prep their vehicles for some bizarre reason.
    On the subject of primitive weapons in survival situations, weapons such as spears and throwing sticks, and clubs can be used almost immediately to procure food. One doesnt have to fashion more complex weapons like bows, if they havn't got that skill set up to speed yet.
    Last edited by Rick; 05-04-2015 at 08:38 AM. Reason: Restored Post

  13. #13

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    The "Apocalypse' rubbish annoys me too. This forums title is "Wilderness Survival", I thought that would be pretty clear to everyone?

    Dudes that wear cammo at the keyboard, and dream of 'when the s@#* hits the fan" crap, really need to get some counselling. Obviously their 9-5 jobs don't fulfil them much, if they need to escape into fantasyland.
    Last edited by Rick; 05-04-2015 at 08:37 AM. Reason: Restored Post

  14. #14
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Well, S can HTF even in the wilderness I guess. We do discuss the broader range of dangers out there. I look at weather related and some man made events (train derailment, meth lab, etc). However, just because I don't believe in something doesn't mean I think they need counseling. Your desire to degrade others with different beliefs is fairly prevalent in your posts. Maybe less coffee through the day would be helpful. Post 12 was a good one.

  15. #15

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    survival comes in many forms, be it hurricaines,civil unrest,wilderness trips gone bad,economic collaspe,major riots such as
    fergusson,mo-baltimore,md and various other natural events happen all the time. these things are not delutional bs.
    they do happen. survival is all about wanting to live. not burying one,s head in the sand cause of the world around them.

  16. #16
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enigma View Post
    The "Apocalypse' rubbish annoys me too. This forums title is "Wilderness Survival", I thought that would be pretty clear to everyone?

    Dudes that wear cammo at the keyboard, and dream of 'when the s@#* hits the fan" crap, really need to get some counselling. Obviously their 9-5 jobs don't fulfil them much, if they need to escape into fantasyland.
    Vote with your remote, and don't pay attention to those threads that annoy you.
    Last edited by hunter63; 04-28-2015 at 05:15 PM.
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  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hayshaker View Post
    survival comes in many forms, be it hurricaines,civil unrest,wilderness trips gone bad,economic collaspe,major riots such as
    fergusson,mo-baltimore,md and various other natural events happen all the time. these things are not delutional bs.
    they do happen. survival is all about wanting to live. not burying one,s head in the sand cause of the world around them.
    No-one is disagreeing with that. They are all localised events.

    However the term 'when the s#$* hits the fan' is bandied around on ALL apocalyptic/survivalist style forums worldwide, as if it's going to be a one time occurrence, and all of humanity as we know it collapses. I can go on a U.S site and read the same crap on a British site, or an Aussie one, and even European ones.

    All this crap about "when our grandchildren inherit a barren earth with no infastructure, we will all need to ride horses". etc, it's ridiculous. Just because something happens in one part of the world, dosen't mean the whole planet is affected. Take Fukishima for instance. No fallout for us, thank you very much.

    I think some people just like to dream of a dystopian world they IMAGINE they would enjoy.
    Last edited by Rick; 05-04-2015 at 08:32 AM. Reason: Restored Post

  18. #18
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enigma View Post
    No-one is disagreeing with that. They are all localised events.

    However the term 'when the s#$* hits the fan' is bandied around on ALL apocalyptic/survivalist style forums worldwide, as if it's going to be a one time occurrence, and all of humanity as we know it collapses. I can go on a U.S site and read the same crap on a British site, or an Aussie one, and even European ones.

    All this crap about "when our grandchildren inherit a barren earth with no infastructure, we will all need to ride horses". etc, it's ridiculous. Just because something happens in one part of the world, dosen't mean the whole planet is affected. Take Fukishima for instance. No fallout for us, thank you very much.

    I think some people just like to dream of a dystopian world they IMAGINE they would enjoy.
    It's a fad that will hopefully be outgrown at some point. That however may take some time since there is a very strong marketing push to convince shoppers that the end is near and they need to buy (insert product here) which they happen to sell......and if you act now get your second one free......just pay extra shipping and handling.
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  19. #19

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    so then is all this survival/shtf/teotawaki stuff just a hussle to sell stuff.
    I really wonder if it is i still got a lot of cool gear if it is true the God help the unprepared
    and those that suffer from normalcy bias/cocnitive dissononance.i must admit there is the backpack porn
    and molle gear issue i suffer from.what can i say i,m a camper at heart

  20. #20

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    My end goal would be to become more self reliant. Have food put away, purchased and home canned, to the point I could go several months and not have to divert funds to food that might be needed to keep the mortgage paid and gas in the truck. Under/unemployment is my biggest concern. I like wilderness survival knowledge because I enjoy camping and am at times in places that knowledge could save me or at least keep me more comfortable. I'm not bugging out to the woods but would love to retire there. :-)

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by jdbushcraft; 04-29-2015 at 11:05 AM.

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