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Thread: Day Pack Contents

  1. #1
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    Default Day Pack Contents

    I received a new daypack for Christmas and I've had the opportunity to use it a little. I've taken it out on a roughly 4 mile day hike and I'm really excited to take it out to the deer stand later this season. Who else uses a day pack? What's in it? My pack's contents:

    MOLLE II Patrol Pack in Woodland

    Main Pocket:

    FAK
    Fire kit
    Mylar blanket
    Tarp (sometimes)
    Water bottle
    Anything trip specific (lunch, box of ammo, tackle box, etc.)
    Anything I find that's worth keeping

    Front Pocket:

    Bucklite MAX fixed blade
    Ferro rod
    Bankline (I forget which number)
    Buck 110 or multitool (sometimes both)
    Small FAK (Band-Aids, Bacitracin, 2x2 gauze, etc.)
    Chisel(s)
    Paracord (25')
    Mini Maglite
    Any tinder I pick up along the way

    This kit is lightweight enough to be comfortable for long distances and carries all or my critical equipment and then some. Do you use a daypack when you go bushcrafting?


  2. #2
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Default

    Check out posts #8 thru #11
    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...ing+fanny+pack

    As you can see different packs for different things......
    Not listed is a forging pack....deployable folding pack that fold up very small, but can be used to picking up foraged berries, tinder, fat wood, just about any thing you find outr and about.
    Last edited by hunter63; 12-30-2014 at 12:38 PM.
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  3. #3
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I don't have a dedicated "day bag". I do have things I carry everyday, however. I call it my man purse. It's actually a shaving kit bag that I keep my essentials in. It includes an Anker external battery, cell phone, essential meds, hearing aid batteries, patch cords for my hearing aid blue tooth device and an ipod. Aside from that I have every day carry items on my person. Probably a lot different than you envisioned. However, everyone has different needs and your needs will change as you get older. Your carry requirements should be dictated by your needs and not by what someone else carries or what is cool.

    I do have get home bags in the vehicles filled with all the expected things like what you listed.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Check out posts #8 thru #11
    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...ing+fanny+pack

    As you can see different packs for different things......
    Not listed is a forging pack....deployable folding pack that fold up very small, but can be used to picking up foraged berries, tinder, fat wood, just about any thing you find outr and about.
    I like it! The forging pouch is a good idea, I've got one actually, but I think it's simpler to just stuff things in the pack. To each his own...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I don't have a dedicated "day bag". I do have things I carry everyday, however. I call it my man purse. It's actually a shaving kit bag that I keep my essentials in. It includes an Anker external battery, cell phone, essential meds, hearing aid batteries, patch cords for my hearing aid blue tooth device and an ipod. Aside from that I have every day carry items on my person. Probably a lot different than you envisioned. However, everyone has different needs and your needs will change as you get older. Your carry requirements should be dictated by your needs and not by what someone else carries or what is cool.

    I do have get home bags in the vehicles filled with all the expected things like what you listed.
    I've got a "man purse" too! It's a Duluth #100 shell bag, which I use as a shooting bag for my muzzleloader. Also, if I don't need a whole backpack, or if I'm taking my ALICE pack, I'll load it up with some of my day pack's contents.

  6. #6
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    Default A rose by any other name

    I also like those "rucksacks", assault pack, backpack or whatever you call them made out of heavy duty Cordura with the webbing straps for attaching extra items. "A rose by any other name" The biggest advantage to me is that when snagged on thorns (wild rose bushes) or other briars you are less likely to loose your gear. A light weight roll top dry bag inside, and water repelling cover helps or just a poncho that goes over you and pack. Here in Texas they have a tax free day for kids to buy school supplies including backpacks. If MOLLE pack is under $100 it counts, LOL. So I went to a local military supply store and bought one on that day once. I was a student of survival...
    Last edited by TXyakr; 12-30-2014 at 05:33 PM. Reason: typos

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXyakr View Post
    I also like those "rucksacks", assault pack, backpack or whatever you call them made out of heavy duty Cordura with the webbing straps for attaching extra items. "A rose by any other name" The biggest advantage to me is that when snagged on thorns (wild rose bushes) or other briars you are less likely to loose your gear. A light weight roll top dry bag inside, and water repelling cover helps or just a poncho that goes over you and pack. Here in Texas they have a tax free day for kids to buy school supplies including backpacks. If MOLLE pack is under $100 it counts, LOL. So I went to a local military supply store and bought one on that day once. I was a student of survival...
    I like it too. That's a good story about the pack, I'm a student of survival as well (I guess we all are!). We don't pay sales tax in Delaware, though.

  8. #8

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    Space blankets are mostly good for a signaling device... as a tool to keep warm, I find it to be totally garbage.

    I may catch some slack on that statement, but Ill stand by it 100%.


    Not near as light, but if you wanted to only carry one item that "could" give some warmth, the USGI bivy bag by it's self is a thousand fold better than a space blanket.


    EB

  9. #9
    Senior Member MrFixIt's Avatar
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    My daypack is an old LL Bean bookbag(?) that I bought for a couple bucks.
    Depending on the weather (I already know the terrain), it holds all I need for shelter, fire, water and food.
    If I were to have to stay overnight, I have a small possibles bag to make it bearable.
    I've never had to overnight, but sometimes choose to do so.
    When all else fails, read the directions, and beware the Chihuahuacabra!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElevenBravo View Post
    Space blankets are mostly good for a signaling device... as a tool to keep warm, I find it to be totally garbage.

    I may catch some slack on that statement, but Ill stand by it 100%.


    Not near as light, but if you wanted to only carry one item that "could" give some warmth, the USGI bivy bag by it's self is a thousand fold better than a space blanket.


    EB
    I think that they'll add some warmth. Like you say, maybe not a lot, but some, anyway. Also, you could use it as a ground mat or "ceiling" for your lean-to. I don't have extensive experience with them, but I've used on as part of my shelter and I've wrapped up in one, both on overnights (by choice both times, I've never had to use one, thank God. Probably should have the other night, though.). I've never tried a bivy bag, maybe I'll get one sometime. Who likes the SOL one?

  11. #11
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool Well, since you asked...

    Quote Originally Posted by Zack View Post
    Who else uses a day pack? What's in it?
    Depends on what I'm doing and where I'm going. The daypack I take on the transit bus I drive would be different than one I take along in the car or the one I use when I go camping....
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  12. #12

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    My day pack is a overnight pack because it usually tends to turn into a overnighter

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrFixIt View Post
    My daypack is an old LL Bean bookbag(?) that I bought for a couple bucks.
    Depending on the weather (I already know the terrain), it holds all I need for shelter, fire, water and food.
    If I were to have to stay overnight, I have a small possibles bag to make it bearable.
    I've never had to overnight, but sometimes choose to do so.
    I've never had to do an overnight, either. I've got enough to survive one, but it wouldn't be comfortable. I generally go day hiking in a State Park so I don't think that I'm allowed to do one, anyway. It'd be fun if I could, though.

  14. #14
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool In addition...

    If I decide to go on a hike when I'm camping, I also carry items on my belt, in my cargo pockets, and a 10 essentials kit somewhere on my person. That may be a small pack with a water bladder depending on the situation....
    SARGE
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    Proud father of a US Marine....SEMPER FI!

    They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
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  15. #15
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    I have a canvas mail bag with a shoulder strap that I really like. I wear it cross body and it hugs to my left side and is very accessible. To me it is more comfortable than a back pack or fanny pack! Just wear knife, pistol, and canteen on belt and everything else is in the bag!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge47 View Post
    If I decide to go on a hike when I'm camping, I also carry items on my belt, in my cargo pockets, and a 10 essentials kit somewhere on my person. That may be a small pack with a water bladder depending on the situation....
    When I go out camping or hiking, I like to carry a knife, whistle, fire starting tool, cordage, and other small things on my person, rather than in my pack. I've got redundancies in the bag, but it's nice to have them on your person. Also, I think it's easier to just reach in my pocket for a penknife or other tool, and not have to dig through my bag to find it.

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