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Thread: Preparing for the Wildlife

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    Junior Member Gismaro's Avatar
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    Default Preparing for the Wildlife

    Hi folks,

    I'm Gismaro. I live in the Netherlands and I am an extreme nature lover. Its really a passion I have and it awakes my cravings of living in the wilds.
    Sadly enough, here in The Netherlands we don't have big landscapes where you can just live and go.
    To kinda inform you on my idea: my plan is to leave society and just start living the way I am supposed to live. See the world, travel by foot (maybe lift if near a road) and really survive off the land. Includes making shelter, finding food, finding water and keeping my mental power up and running.
    Preparing for a big decision like this is not really hard for me, because I have been/and still am taking Survival classes every month. I go outdoors a lot, to Belgium, Norway and France and just live for a week or so in the wilds.

    Now, I've been thinking about The United States. I really want to start in the US, because there is so much to see. From the Louisana Swamp to the cold Alaska. Personally I've really wanted to see the US landscapes and live in it.
    The only concern I have is moving to the US. I know there are a lot of possibilities to live in the US. But I don't need a house, a car and probably no health insurance, etc. I might sound crazy, but I hope you can see it through my perspective.
    When I move to the US, I know I'm gonna have a lot of stuff to pay.
    But is it possible to move to the US and live in the wilds? Are there gonna be millions of bills waiting for me? (Not that I'm planning to go back) But I really don't wanna catch a felony and be wanted.
    So, can anyone answer my question if its even possible to switch countries and pursue this dream? Or do I need to live under society forever with no other option?

    Not sure if I'm at the right spot for this question. But I've been trying to find an answer for days now.
    So I hope some one can help me out a bit.

    Thanks,
    Gismaro


  2. #2

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    Payne here does a lot of cross country (hitch) hiking. He's from Canada but does come down into the US.
    Read some of his posts. Here's a good one:
    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...ighlight=payne
    and another exchange with Firstimestar about camping/hiking Alaska:
    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...ighlight=payne

    You won't be able to live in the wild in the US any more than you can in the Netherlands. The land is owned by someone. Hunting and fishing require licenses and permits and those all vary by state. I don't know the visiting status for people from the Netherlands but you will probably need some sort of VISA if you intend to stay long-term, unless you apply for a greencard of some sort. If you have no permanent address, you may be picked up for vagrancy, though this country has its share of the homeless. FYI, you have to cross through Canada to get to Alaska. Might want to plan for that. Don't be an illegal immigrant here.

    Hop on over to the intro forum when you get a chance.
    Last edited by LowKey; 12-07-2014 at 05:04 PM.
    If we are to have another contest inůour national existence I predict that the dividing line will not be Mason and Dixon's, but between patriotism & intelligence on the one side, and superstition, ambition & ignorance on the otherů
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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    I your position (Europe) I think I would head for Siberia....lot more room to wonder around.....and you can drive or hitch-hike there.....
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
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    I dunno, H63, would you want to be roaming around Russia right now?
    If we are to have another contest inůour national existence I predict that the dividing line will not be Mason and Dixon's, but between patriotism & intelligence on the one side, and superstition, ambition & ignorance on the otherů
    ~ President Ulysses S. Grant

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    No, not me.....
    I guess it just tweaks me somewhat that everyone and their brother thinks that the US is just this big wide open space....for anyone to just cruise around, camp, hunt, fish, build, shelters, live off the land....and do what ever they want....and it's all FREE.

    After all he been looking for an answer for DAYS NOW.....

    Russia is closer, so way not?....after all there are 13.1 square Kilometer....many climates and even time zones.....what's one more?
    .
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
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    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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    Junior Member Tokwan's Avatar
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    hmmmm...........looks like many wanna leave society...
    I'm a Gramp who is not computer savvy, give me a slab and the rock ages tablet..I will do fine!

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    Ed edr730's Avatar
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    Gismaro, For a vacation visa you will need to go to the governments USCIS site. I doubt you will be able to obtain one, but you can try. An application for staying in the US once you are here is extremely unlikely to be successful.

    You can probably travel all you want south of the United States and there are a lot of things to see down there as well. Some people are very friendly and others dangerous. The forests are not as safe either and you would need to learn about them.

    It's true that traveling around with a backpack and hitch hiking in the US is fairly safe and cheap and you could see what you wish to see. Many years ago you could ride certain freight trains and you would not be bothered. You would still need to do a bit of work illegally from time to time. There used to be free food hand outs in major cities for the poor, but in most cities that is now illegal to share food like that. Many people who you come to know will share with you and at times, you with them.
    Good luck with a visa. You will need to change your story and come up with lots of cash first. I don't doubt that Siberia is more like the wilderness you may be dreaming about. If it turns out to be Siberia, you better find a lake with lots of fish first because the first thing that comes to my mind is starvation.

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    Junior Member Gismaro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    No, not me.....
    I guess it just tweaks me somewhat that everyone and their brother thinks that the US is just this big wide open space....for anyone to just cruise around, camp, hunt, fish, build, shelters, live off the land....and do what ever they want....and it's all FREE.

    After all he been looking for an answer for DAYS NOW.....

    Russia is closer, so way not?....after all there are 13.1 square Kilometer....many climates and even time zones.....what's one more?
    .

    I definitely understand what you are saying. It's not all free and its not for everyone. But I am willing to do whatever it takes. Includes getting a visa, etc. But I've been to Russia before and atm its not that safe. I get what you're saying and maybe you feel like I'm just a random wanting to live of the American land and stuff, but this is really something I would wanna do. I've been saving a lot of money to even go. So, I know its not free, I'm not that na´ve.

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    Junior Member Gismaro's Avatar
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    Yes I see. The south seems great and I've been doing some research about it. It seems great.
    I was thinking about applying for a greencard and do any sorts of applications that's possible for me.

    A change of story would be necessary, yes. Siberia seems great, indeed. But it's not exactly the land I've wanted to discover first.
    I'm struggling with the question: If it all works out and I am an American citizen. Will it even be possible to leave after that? (Well, stay in the US) But, live through the wilds?
    Or do I have to have an adress, bankaccount, insurance, etc?

  10. #10
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    Default Good idea, more to consider

    Times have changes and laws have multiplied but "were there is a will there is a way" Gismaro. About 130 years ago my grandfather immigrated from Germany to the USA. He worked for the Railroads to see the country, down to Texas, Dakotas out west, spent very little time in the East. He homesteaded in N-Dakota, sold it as dust bowl began. Homesteaded 2nd time in Alberta. He was born in 1865, my father 1915, me 1964 we have a tradition of much adventure before marriage.

    But my advice for you is to consider a job as a wilderness adventure guide out in Western USA or Canada (easier immigration laws), check out as much different wilderness (as you suggested) getting paid to do it. I.e. in Canadian or Alaskan National Parks during the summer and in Texas, Louisiana, Florida etc during the winter car pool cheaply between. Something like that might workout. Also a ranch worker in TX, OK, NM, Arizona, California, NV etc. Pay is very low but the adventure is great. One day a week off offers great hikes, perhaps a week off after long 15 hour work days and you can hike deep into the nearby wilderness. Just ideas to consider.

    I also had a friend from Germany who started a ranch with cattle, pigs and chocolate beans etc in the Amazon Rain forest. He was a self styled Marlboro man. Died of lung cancer unfortunately. He and I slaughtered pigs together speaking Portuguese in a thick German accent thru the tube in his throat. Good memories. These adventures will remain with you forever.

    BTW I have a relative whose family does horse packing trips into Yellowstone National Park. They probably do not need to hire any new workers but that would be fun job. But hard work.

    Edit: Bus and Train transportation service in the USA is generally very poor compared to Europe and most of the rest of the world were it is typically reliable and affordable. I recommend car pooling or ride sharing with people you meet and work with. One caveat to that is that rural areas of Brazil and Nigeria were I could once travel by bus safely are now often held up by armed bandits, so I would not recommend surface travel in a growing number of 3rd world places but N.A. is mostly very safe, but Buses are not economical or very safe in the USA. I almost got arrested for loitering at a station in Phoenix, AZ that was closed when the bus dropped me there. This would NEVER happen in Europe or S.A.
    Last edited by TXyakr; 12-08-2014 at 12:38 PM. Reason: typos, Bus service in USA is poor

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    Alaska, The Madness! 1stimestar's Avatar
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    coolworks.com
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    Default few months to earn $, few months of adventure, repeat

    My cousins's youngest son (in his 20's) is continuing our family tradition the best. He is a highly skilled welder. He works for several months of the year, many hours a day in the Edmonton, Alberta area (petroleum industry) then spends the rest of the year traveling very inexpensively around the world surfing. Wherever he goes he stays with other surfers, buys a used board from a surfer leaving and "lives the life". Can also make some money teaching tourists how to surf or taking them on little day adventures. Search coolworks.com and other online places for job opportunities. Jobs in Alaska, North Dakota Petroleum fields, Midland, TX, Alberta, CA are great but "cost of living" is high so learn to live very simply. Spend on adventure not stuff which only slows you down.

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    Default Native American reservation with special access to wilderness, job of a lifetime

    As a kid my next door neighbors were 2nd/3rd generation Dutch Canadians. (3 blonde girls about my age). They spent most of their non-school year living in a remote area with the "Canela" people who had "adopted" them. No electricity or running water/plumbing etc, mostly wild game and fish to eat, lots of rice with some beans if you were lucky. Two of the girls and their parents now live about an hour west of Edmonton, AB. I occasionally get up there to visit. The father is an excellent canoe paddler, very intellectual/academic but also a good outdoorsman.

    Photo of the indigenous Canela with their favorite sport, a relay race: Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.

    So my suggestion is to find a job working on an Native American reservation and possibly get access to fantastic land not accessible to most Americans. I have lived in remote parts of the Amazon were most Brazilians are to allowed to go, access is strictly forbidden.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gismaro View Post
    " ... Preparing for a big decision like this is not really hard for me, because I have been/and still am taking Survival classes every month. ...
    Gismaro, taking survival classes won't help you much in the United States, unless you also have some marketable work skills. What is your profession when you're not out in the woods enjoying Nature???

    S.M.
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    - Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790),U.S. statesman, scientist, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

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    Junior Member Gismaro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seniorman View Post
    Gismaro, taking survival classes won't help you much in the United States, unless you also have some marketable work skills. What is your profession when you're not out in the woods enjoying Nature???

    S.M.

    I work at a Survival/Wilderniss school as a teacher about how to survive in the wilds, its non paid, but I teach people this at the same school I take classes from.
    And besides that I chop wood at a farm 3 days a week. And sometimes I have to build stuff with the wood I chopped, like small cabins and such.
    I'm not saying I'm prepared and know everything about the wildlife and surviving. Because you can NEVER be fully prepared and have all the knowledge you need. But what I was trying to say is that my heart lies there and its just my passion.

  16. #16
    Junior Member Gismaro's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot for this answer! Some great stuff I've read.
    I can definitely use this!

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