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Thread: Bug Out Bag Questions !

  1. #1

    Default Bug Out Bag Questions !

    So I have a bug out bag . I think its pretty much complete . But my main question is "How do you know when your bug out bag is done" ? Is it ever done ? Is not then what else do I put in it ? All answers to these questions are appreciated . Thanks .


  2. #2
    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Cameron,

    I don't think that one's preps are ever "done" in that you can sit back and never worry or come up with something else. Once you feel the bag is done, take it on a test run. Find out what was helpful and keep those items. Find out what wasn't helpful and get rid of those items. Find out what would have worked better and replace those items. Find out what you found yourself saying "Gee, I wish I had......" and add those items.

    Then there are the seasons to deal with. I am not humping a parka and wool socks around in the summer, for example. Likewise, I am not keeping bug repellant around in the winter.

    You also have to routinely inspect you gear. Make sure it is serviceable, nothing has leaked, rotate expiration dates, etc.

    Just some things for you to consider.
    ”There's nothing glorious in dying. Anyone can do it.” ~Johnny Rotten

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    Thank you so much ! Thats exactally what I was looking for . +1 Rep for you !

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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    We are all here to learn. I have definitely learned a lot here and continue to do so. I'm sure others will add there input too. Thanks.
    ”There's nothing glorious in dying. Anyone can do it.” ~Johnny Rotten

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    BOB, GHB, GOOD, SHTF, TEOTWAWKI and going to flea markets bags or even gym bags are never done.

    Hopefully as you get older and start driving you can afford to fill your vehicle with gear.....

    It's like finding the holy grail or finding the end on the internet.....

    Have fun with it, it will stretch your mind and skills....of you actually try and use your gear.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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    Senior Member Old GI's Avatar
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    Just remember - you will replace, delete and add things over the years. Also, remember if items have shelf/service life, you need to rotate in and out.
    When Wealth is Lost, Nothing is Lost;
    When Health is Lost, Something is Lost;
    When Character is Lost, ALL IS LOST!!!!!!!

    Colonel Charles Hyatt circa 1880

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    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool Well, since you asked...

    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron_May27 View Post
    So I have a bug out bag . I think its pretty much complete . But my main question is "How do you know when your bug out bag is done" ?
    Stick a fork in it!....

    Seriously though, check out this book, it's a great help!

    http://www.amazon.com/Build-Perfect-...ect+bugout+bag

    SARGE
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
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  8. #8

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    a few thoughts try having two 1. a threeseason bag one that will get you through most any situation
    during the first 3seasons. i must also add you have to take into account the region of the country
    you live in.are you north or south of the mason-dixon line? north or south unless your in the far south
    central southern fla say you will wish to keep a set of light thermals vaccumed of course.if your north
    of the line you,ll want a winter loadout for the first 4months.bugging out you have to concider your personal health
    the terrain from where your bugging out from and to.there could be vast differnces in weather and terrain altitude
    all at the same time of year.can you climb a tree to sleep in serious post shtf depending on your region and route
    you could face packs of fearl dogs wolves coyote bears ect... i,m not kidding.all of your clothes and 1staid
    gear you,ll want to keep in inside out gallon freezer ziplocs then vaccum sealed.learn to become a scrounger
    look at every thing you pass as you walk. more things than you can imagine are useful if you just think
    outside the box.

    wintertime kepping warm,dry and hydrated will be your prime concerns oh and fed as well ofcourse. so pack yourself
    a threeseason bag with all you think you,ll need take a 4or 5 day trip now. and write down every thing you used
    and every thing you did,nt use that will give you some idea of what you,ll need to carry.

    everyone,s needs are differnt your needs will differ from others so dont pack your bag like the one you saw on youtube
    cause you thought it was the bomb who knows that guy for all you know has never once been camping in his life

    and post shtf buggingout is a life or death situation.

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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    And always remember;

    Prepping for real life emergencies is well within most people's abilities.

    Prepping for imaginary end of the world scenarios is a never ending impossibility and will drive one, and everyone around them, crazy.
    Come to the dark side, we have pudding.

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    Junior Member Tokwan's Avatar
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    I have 3 bug out bags...and I always seem to be taking out 1 or 2 item and replacing them with 1 or 2 item...then a few weeks later, its back to the square one.
    What I can advise is...put an items list on your bug out bag. And place other essentials beside it. The next time you wanna go out with the BOB...think where you wanna go, and what would you need to bring?
    And its a never ending story.
    I'm a Gramp who is not computer savvy, give me a slab and the rock ages tablet..I will do fine!

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I believe the biggest factor in determining what goes into your BOB is first having a plan. Here's what I mean by that.

    What are you bugging out from?

    Well.....I want to plan for what is likely to happen, not necessarily the latest trend that is scaring people into action. In order to do that I have filled out a threat assessment and listed all of the things that I believe are possible for my area. I then ranked the things on that list in order to prepare for what was most likely.

    For me, weather related events are near the top of my list. In preparing for them (or whatever is at the top of your list) you will find that you probably cover a lot of ground in preparing for the other things on your list.

    I believe that the next thing to determine is to have a plan on where you are bugging out to. Not all BOBs are intended to allow you to live primitively in the woods - nor should they be. If your plans are to stay at a motel that is 30 miles inland and escape the fury of the pounding surf (just an example), then having six ways to start a fire, a hobo stove and four trash can liners may not serve you as well as they could.

    Having a roll of quarters, copies of important paperwork (insurance, phone numbers, etc), some small bills (If power is out people will still sell you things, but may not be able to make change), medications, etc may serve you better.

    Once you have done all of that - TEST IT!

    If your plan involves staying in the woods - do that. Then evaluate what worked - what didn't, and adjust accordingly.

    If your plan involves staying at a Comfort Inn - do that and evaluate. Could you contact everybody you needed to contact? Did your phone battery last? (remember that when a disaster is more than just a localized event in your neighborhood that cell towers will be jammed and you may not have voice capabilities for a while).

    The list goes on and on, but hopefully this gets you headed in the right direction.
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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    I believe the biggest factor in determining what goes into your BOB is first having a plan. Here's what I mean by that.

    What are you bugging out from?

    Well.....I want to plan for what is likely to happen, not necessarily the latest trend that is scaring people into action. In order to do that I have filled out a threat assessment and listed all of the things that I believe are possible for my area. I then ranked the things on that list in order to prepare for what was most likely.

    For me, weather related events are near the top of my list. In preparing for them (or whatever is at the top of your list) you will find that you probably cover a lot of ground in preparing for the other things on your list.

    I believe that the next thing to determine is to have a plan on where you are bugging out to. Not all BOBs are intended to allow you to live primitively in the woods - nor should they be. If your plans are to stay at a motel that is 30 miles inland and escape the fury of the pounding surf (just an example), then having six ways to start a fire, a hobo stove and four trash can liners may not serve you as well as they could.

    Having a roll of quarters, copies of important paperwork (insurance, phone numbers, etc), some small bills (If power is out people will still sell you things, but may not be able to make change), medications, etc may serve you better.

    Once you have done all of that - TEST IT!

    If your plan involves staying in the woods - do that. Then evaluate what worked - what didn't, and adjust accordingly.

    If your plan involves staying at a Comfort Inn - do that and evaluate. Could you contact everybody you needed to contact? Did your phone battery last? (remember that when a disaster is more than just a localized event in your neighborhood that cell towers will be jammed and you may not have voice capabilities for a while).

    The list goes on and on, but hopefully this gets you headed in the right direction.
    This is fantastic advice.
    ”There's nothing glorious in dying. Anyone can do it.” ~Johnny Rotten

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