Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 85

Thread: How to be a good shot

  1. #1
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Yukon River Watershed, Canada
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Question How to be a good shot

    So what tips do you have for neophyte hunters to practice their shooting so that the animal will die instantly?? What has kept me from shooting anything so far is partly the horror of the animal not dying right aways. I don't have a problem with the concept of killing an animal to eat it, but it would really haunt me if I caused the animal to suffer at any length before dying.
    I'm pretty good shooting at a target but is there anything in particular you'd recommend that might make you a "one-shot-and-it's-dead" hunter??


  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildWoman View Post
    So what tips do you have for neophyte hunters to practice their shooting so that the animal will die instantly?? What has kept me from shooting anything so far is partly the horror of the animal not dying right aways. I don't have a problem with the concept of killing an animal to eat it, but it would really haunt me if I caused the animal to suffer at any length before dying.
    I'm pretty good shooting at a target but is there anything in particular you'd recommend that might make you a "one-shot-and-it's-dead" hunter??
    I'm assuming you've been taught good marksmanship on the range? Breathing, controlled squeeze, etc? Same principles. And aim for a vital area.
    If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquility of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.
    Samuel Adams
    Dogs are not my whole life, but they make my life whole.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Tahyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Wildwoman, assuming what Alpine said is true, make sure you are using the right weapon for the job. Don't use a gun not powerful enough to do the job, but on the same note, don't use a very powerful gun to try to kill very small game.

    Here's a link to get you started. Keep in mind that there are going to be differing opinions, but generally speaking all pretty much agree with the same area.

    http://www.fieldandstream.com/articl...categoryID=119

    The other think to keep in mind is that sooner or later you are going to hit something and it is not going to die right away.
    "The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done."

  4. #4

    Default

    Nice find on the article.

    On a semi-humorous note, Isaw the result of a cousin who mixed up their 12ga. load one day when dove hunting. Buck shot on a bird hunt makes a nice mist.
    If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquility of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.
    Samuel Adams
    Dogs are not my whole life, but they make my life whole.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tony uk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,579

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpine_Sapper View Post
    Nice find on the article.

    On a semi-humorous note, Isaw the result of a cousin who mixed up their 12ga. load one day when dove hunting. Buck shot on a bird hunt makes a nice mist.
    Mmmmm Pre-minced bird No chopping required
    A wise person does at once, what a fool does at last. Both do the same thing; only at different times.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Tahyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpine_Sapper View Post
    Nice find on the article.

    On a semi-humorous note, Isaw the result of a cousin who mixed up their 12ga. load one day when dove hunting. Buck shot on a bird hunt makes a nice mist.
    When I was about 14 years old, we were "pass shooting" teal. I was using a 12 gauge 30 inch full choke with #7 1/2s. It was one of those low flying teal that was coming almost dead on to me. All I know is that it was one of those shots that should have missed, but it didn't and he was close. Made a mess all over me and didn't leave much to pick up.
    "The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done."

  7. #7
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Yukon River Watershed, Canada
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Thanks - not much "training" to boast of, more like some guys showing me the ropes. I have a 30-06 and a moose, black bear or mountain goat would be the unlucky target. Is there really no other trick to it than just doing the same stuff as when target shooting?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Tahyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Other than what Alpine said earlier about "good marksmanship on the range? Breathing, controlled squeeze, etc? Same principles. And aim for a vital area.", that's about it. Your biggest hurdle if you have not done it before is going to be trying to stay calm. Some people really start breathing hard and the adrenalin rush can sometimes mess you up if you can't control it.

    Make sure you have the best possible chance at a clean un-obstructed shot.
    "The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done."

  9. #9
    Senior Member LadyTrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    139
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    If you are a good shot on the range and confident of your markmenship...a head or neck shot is the most effective in putting them down the fastest and quickest....these targets are smaller but require extreme accuracy. The way I see it, if I aim for the neck/head and miss, it will more than likely be a clean miss because of the size of the target...rather than aim for the foreshoulder for example and either hit high or low, hitting leg bone or worse...paunching the animal. Aim small...hit big.
    Target shooting is most definitely different than when a big game animal is in your sights.
    Breathe and squeeze my friend.
    ~Earth receives foot and paw, hoof and claw with equal grace. But it is the way of the wild not to overstep...let's leave no trace that wind, rain and snow cannot erase~

  10. #10
    Senior Member Ole WV Coot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southern WV , raised in Eastern KY up a holler
    Posts
    2,668

    Default

    Don't shoot at the whole animal, pick a spot and know where the vital areas are. A 30-06 packs a pretty fair kick and some ladies have a problem with it. Practice, Practice can't say it enough. Take advantage of any cover and try and get as close as you can. Shoot off a rest, sitting or on your stomach. If you get a good shot and a deer drops, drink a cup of coffee, read a book or do something for about 1/2 hr and the animal will die without running like crazy and getting all gamey tasting. That's the easy part, the rest is work.

  11. #11
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Yukon River Watershed, Canada
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyTrapper View Post
    If you are a good shot on the range and confident of your markmenship...a head or neck shot is the most effective in putting them down the fastest and quickest....these targets are smaller but require extreme accuracy. The way I see it, if I aim for the neck/head and miss, it will more than likely be a clean miss because of the size of the target...rather than aim for the foreshoulder for example and either hit high or low, hitting leg bone or worse...paunching the animal. Aim small...hit big.
    That sounds like a really good idea to inexperienced me. What do other folks think about it?

  12. #12

    Default

    I like to put one in the pump house, heart lung areathe ribs and shoulders will not deflect a bullet as much as the skull. But it also depends on the position of the animal. Draw a line from where the bullet will enter to the point it will or would exit in your minds eye. A head shot will do it but it also will ruin the head if you are planed to have the animal mounted.
    Any goverment big enough to give you everything you want is strong enough to take everything you have...T Jefferson

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildWoman View Post
    That sounds like a really good idea to inexperienced me. What do other folks think about it?
    If you don't feel comfortable taking a body shot for a vital organ, and your concerned about lingering pain from a non-fatal wound, absolutely.

    And if it's not a hunt for food but self defense, you can probably count on most animals bolting at the sound of a decent powered rifle. A .22 pistol not so much. I know in Scandinavia they carry rifles to scare away the polar bears, and one shot in the air *usually* does the trick.

    If it's for food, well, that depends on how hungry you are. If you can survive without it, sure, go for the head shot, and take the chance. If it's take the game or starve, take the chance on a wound and track situation.

    Just my $.02
    If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquility of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.
    Samuel Adams
    Dogs are not my whole life, but they make my life whole.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Tahyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Like beerrunner I'd rather go for the heart lung area. I'd rather pass up a shot than risk winging what I'm shooting at, and I have passed on my share. If it was a survival situation I may be more liberal with my choice of shots, but if I was just doing normal hunting... the "shot" is either there or it's not.
    The other thing is the more head-on the shot into the chest, be aware that it's probably going to end up in the abdomen and that can get messy if it goes through the guts come time to dress it.
    "The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done."

  15. #15
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,934
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Practice. Know your weapon and what it likes to shoot. It will not perform the same with all ammo. Know you and your weapons limits. The best shot will be the heart / lung. I've seen botched head shots and they are not pretty. Be patient for the right shot. Some folks don't kill and that does not make you less of a survivor. It may make you more resourcefully for gathering and other skills. Don't point your weapon on anything you do not intend to shoot. Don't put your finger on the trigger until ready to shoot. Know your target and what is beyond it. blah, blah, blah. i.e. Don't pull a Cheney.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rebel View Post
    Practice. Know your weapon and what it likes to shoot. It will not perform the same with all ammo. Know you and your weapons limits. The best shot will be the heart / lung. I've seen botched head shots and they are not pretty. Be patient for the right shot. Some folks don't kill and that does not make you less of a survivor. It may make you more resourcefully for gathering and other skills. Don't point your weapon on anything you do not intend to shoot. Don't put your finger on the trigger until ready to shoot. Know your target and what is beyond it. blah, blah, blah. i.e. Don't pull a Cheney.
    Hey don't pick on Dick. after all it was a lawyer he shot.
    Any goverment big enough to give you everything you want is strong enough to take everything you have...T Jefferson

  17. #17

    Default

    All the info posted on here is really good, so I hope you don’t mind if I add my .02 on my very first post. These are just a few tips to add to the ones you have now.

    1. The 30-06 Springfield (7.62x63mm) is a fantastic caliber. But there more to it than what meets the eye. I would highly encourage you find the right cartridge for what you expect to encounter. Some go fast and deep with minimal damage (in relation to cal.) and some go slower with a heavier wound channel. With the ammunition advancements over the past few years, you should be able to find the right round that delivers most of its kinetic energy within the range you are comfortable with.

    2. Know your cone of fire/trajectory/MOA in relation to the impact zone. I’ll use an example taken from the Federal Arms trajectory table. The round is Triple Shock 180 grains with the zero at 200 yards, the drop or rise is in inches:
    50yrd .9
    100yrd 2.0
    200yrd zero
    300yrd -8.6
    300yrd with 10mph crosswind -8.6 lateral.

    What this does for you is simple. If the hypothetical kill zone is 12 inches, then you would know that within 300yards of your target, you could place your sight center mass and without calculating the rise, fall or range (within reason), your shot will be in the kill zone. Basically, this would buy you more time for a smoother shot and shot placement.

    Sorry for the ramble, I just realized how long my post is; I think I’ll get off my soapbox now.

  18. #18
    Cold Heartless Breed tsitenha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kanata
    Posts
    979

    Default

    1. often there is no "instant kill" but you can make it as humane as possible.
    2. use enough gun, and back off the power setting of your scope so you can see all of the animal, aim for a specific spot, not just hair.
    3. go out and help other hunters field dress an animal if you can and see exactly where the vitals zones are actually located from as many angles as you can determine and the size of them.
    4. go help a butcher work his way around an animal to make the best use/cuts when you get yours
    5. start with smaller game and as experience is acquired expand your game options

  19. #19
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Chugach National Forest
    Posts
    9,795
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    I have guided two women who had never fire a firearm ever in there life, not in practice at the range, never. One women got a Moose and one got a Caribou the very first time they ever discharged any firearm.

  20. #20
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    SW Indiana
    Posts
    902

    Default

    wildWoman In shooting game you must understand that not even the best placed shot always kills instantly. Even if life lasts only a few seconds some animals can travel a very impressive distance before death overcomes them. Here is the rule of thumb for a shot to drop an animal where it stands. You picture the placement of the shoulder opposite side from you and you aim for it's rotator cuff. This will put the bullet through the lungs and breaking that off shoulder will knock most big game animals down. A broadside or slightly quartering away shot are prefered for this of coarse. You'll need to study the antomy of each animal you hunt for. So you know where the vitals and the skeleton are so you can envision that off shoulder.Neck and head shots are too risky for a beginner. One last thing you may have heard the axiom "Practice makes perfect." well that axiom is only half right Perfect practice makes perfect. When training do everything by the numbers slowly and surely. With familiarity will come more speed. Remember the words of Wyatt Earp. "Speed is fine but accuracy is fin-al. The key is to do things slowly in a hurry." That means doing them by the numbers so many times slowly and with care and control that you can do them with your eyes closed or even in reverse order. Get yourself some dryfire safety caps. These will allow you to cycle the action, take aim, breath deep, hold, squeeze and release held breath s the trigger breaks over and recycle the action for a follow up shot and reaquire target once you have the actions mastered and someone has explain what your "soght picture" should be with your choice of scope and can acquire that sight picture with smooth nearly effortless movement you'll nbe ready to actually shoot some holes in paper. Once again doing everything slow and by the numbers. So let's recap, Study animal anatomy, fo perfect practice in dry fire exercises, do live fire exercises and always by the numbers and you'll be an absolutely lethal markswoman. Take it from a former Marine Corps sniper.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •